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Old 10-30-2014, 08:21 AM
 
33,046 posts, read 22,039,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
Frankly I hate to say it but more and more its by scale of income. Often that has driven to two workers middle and even upper middle class income families. Once ordinances where enough in a area but now more and more are adopting stricter contracts of HOA's. Life style between one income area and another can even vary greatly. private holloween in gated communities is one sign of that. Even looking at retired ;many now free of work requirement move to smaller towns to escape the violence and get back to year past days in culture. The very rich go to very elite cost wise areas to retire; if only for a country estate same as thru out history.

People oughta just admit class warfare plays out across America every day, and in most places, the poor are not winning.
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Old 10-30-2014, 09:27 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
People oughta just admit class warfare plays out across America every day, and in most places, the poor are not winning.
Since most class warfare is coming from the poor, it looks like they can't win much of anything, now can they?
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Old 10-30-2014, 12:44 PM
 
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Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
Sounds like renters have a DISincentive to improve their neighborhoods.

Or as I like to say, renters are negative stakeholders in their neighborhoods.
Not really. Renters lack the capital and the permission to improve their neighborhoods. Home owners actually own the building and can make improvements to it. The transitory nature of renters in my experience can be an problem. They are easy come, easy go. They don't have much at stake and can leave easily which can make getting long term problems in an neighborhood hard to address.
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Old 10-30-2014, 12:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
Sounds like rents necessarily skyrocket because people intentionally keep supply of the market.
Rents is determined both by demand and by the costs to the landlord. The supply of rental units is determined by the number of people who have the cash and are willing to put up with being an landlord. Very few people want to have strangers living on their property.
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Old 10-30-2014, 05:00 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ringwise View Post
Since most class warfare is coming from the poor, it looks like they can't win much of anything, now can they?

Zoning is class warfare, and never emanates from the poor.
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Old 10-30-2014, 05:03 PM
 
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Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Rents is determined both by demand and by the costs to the landlord. The supply of rental units is determined by the number of people who have the cash and are willing to put up with being an landlord. Very few people want to have strangers living on their property.

So on one hand you have homeowners foregoing rental income, and then using zoning in an attempt to compensate by increasing their property values.
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Old 10-30-2014, 05:08 PM
 
33,046 posts, read 22,039,041 times
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Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Not really. Renters lack the capital and the permission to improve their neighborhoods. Home owners actually own the building and can make improvements to it. The transitory nature of renters in my experience can be an problem. They are easy come, easy go. They don't have much at stake and can leave easily which can make getting long term problems in an neighborhood hard to address.

Are renters transitory by choice or by necessity? In one five year period, I faced five rent increases and had to move (was priced out) three times. Later I was able to stay more than ten years without being priced out.

i.e. who is the cause of renters being transitory, renters or their landlords? I'd prefer to stay put if I could.
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Old 10-31-2014, 11:28 AM
 
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Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
So on one hand you have homeowners foregoing rental income, and then using zoning in an attempt to compensate by increasing their property values.
Homeowners are homeowners they don't all wish to be landlords and that is a big difference. They just are not interested in rental income being generated by their own personal residence and for good reason.

There are law regarding things like min. temperature, required and working appliances, and deposit. Not to mention the requirement to provide working plumbing and electricity. If the furnace breaks in the granny flat in the middle of winter, it must be fixed vs. just winterizing the place until you have the funds to fix it. If the stove or refrigerator does not work it must be fixed or replaced vs. just tell you guest not to use it.

There are policies that could endanger the ownership of their homes such as taking housing that is being used for drug dealing. Or could cause you hassles such as being required to attend community meeting because your tenant was caught using your building to sell drugs.


There are laws regarding privacy and when the landlord can enter the apartment without permission of the renter that could generate fines or endanger the rental agreement or other hassle. There is an whole lengthy process of eviction should you need or want to get rid of the tenant.

Renting out the granny flat isn't an simple, risk and hassle free way to make money. Thus the granny flat tends to be used for guests, or for elderly family members.

Zoning is more about protecting home values than increasing them. Zoning in and of itself won't cause home values to increase, but can prevent them falling. I know I wouldn't want to buy an house next to an loud bar, strip club or factory.
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Old 10-31-2014, 11:42 AM
 
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Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
Are renters transitory by choice or by necessity? In one five year period, I faced five rent increases and had to move (was priced out) three times. Later I was able to stay more than ten years without being priced out.

i.e. who is the cause of renters being transitory, renters or their landlords? I'd prefer to stay put if I could.
I would bet you were priced out being low wage work has not kept up with inflation. It is always in the landlord's favor to increase rent. It is just that the landlord may or may not get another tenant. So long as the landlord can get another tenant able to pay more, rent will increase. Also in some cases the landlord may have no choice but to pass the increase along to you such as an increase in property taxes or repair to building or just plain inflation.

Homeowners have an advantage in that they can get an fixed loan and the only danger to them are increases in property taxes. They lose that fixed loan when moving(it could and likely will go up if they buy an similar house.). Inflation is friend to the mortgage payer because that $500 a month mortgage that was an lot in the 1980ies is cheap now.

Also part of the reason why people choose to be renters is because they want flexibility to move. So it is both.
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Old 11-01-2014, 05:53 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,472 posts, read 5,143,862 times
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National educational testing is a modern form of segregation as many people with children who value education will pay dearly to move to a community with higher test scores. Development alone will not attract people who value education if the community does not have real or perceived "good schools" which are often defined as higher test scores.
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