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Old 11-01-2014, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,061 posts, read 102,770,515 times
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Originally Posted by Lincolnian View Post
National educational testing is a modern form of segregation as many people with children who value education will pay dearly to move to a community with higher test scores. Development alone will not attract people who value education if the community does not have real or perceived "good schools" which are often defined as higher test scores.
It's always been that way. The wealthy have always had "school choice", either by being able to afford a neighborhood with good schools or by sending their kids to private schools. There's no national testing. It's all state level. Schools did standardized testing before NCLB. I'm no fan of the whole testing thing, mind you.
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Old 11-01-2014, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,499 posts, read 5,158,565 times
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
It's always been that way. The wealthy have always had "school choice", either by being able to afford a neighborhood with good schools or by sending their kids to private schools. There's no national testing. It's all state level. Schools did standardized testing before NCLB. I'm no fan of the whole testing thing, mind you.
I'm sorry. I misstated that. I meant the move to state-wide tests required formerly under NCLB and now under Race to the Top in order to secure federal funds. These tests have been used to justify high real estate values in high-performing districts when the gaps are largely related to the educational level of the parents and their economic level. The success of a high performing district or failure of a low-performing district becomes self fulfilling. As children from lower performing districts move in for better educational opportunities the higher income levels move out. Entrance into the high-performing districts effectively is blocked out by economics. This has happened in the past but is more accentuated now because scores and school performance is well publicized and actively marketed.
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Old 11-01-2014, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,061 posts, read 102,770,515 times
Reputation: 33122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincolnian View Post
I'm sorry. I misstated that. I meant the move to state-wide tests required formerly under NCLB and now under Race to the Top in order to secure federal funds. These tests have been used to justify high real estate values in high-performing districts when the gaps are largely related to the educational level of the parents and their economic level. The success of a high performing district or failure of a low-performing district becomes self fulfilling. As children from lower performing districts move in for better educational opportunities the higher income levels move out. Entrance into the high-performing districts effectively is blocked out by economics. This has happened in the past but is more accentuated now because scores and school performance is well publicized and actively marketed.
Still, it's nothing new. Real estate sales has always been about marketing. Schools have long touted their graduation rates, college attendance rates, scholarship dollars earned, and the like. Nothing new under the sun!
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Old 11-02-2014, 11:20 AM
 
3,271 posts, read 3,014,223 times
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Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
Are renters transitory by choice or by necessity? In one five year period, I faced five rent increases and had to move (was priced out) three times. Later I was able to stay more than ten years without being priced out.

i.e. who is the cause of renters being transitory, renters or their landlords? I'd prefer to stay put if I could.
Both.

People can be pushed out by higher rents, but they also have the opportunity to more easily leave to be closer to a new job, to get a place more appropriate for a changing life situation (new kid, live in significant other, etc.), to be closer to family, or just for a change of scenery. It's both push and pull -- although if I were to hazard a guess without hard data, I'd guess the increased mobility is more voluntary than involuntary.
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Old 11-05-2014, 05:25 PM
 
56,843 posts, read 81,169,050 times
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This article made me think about this thread: The Transformation of Syracuse: Condo
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