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Old 10-20-2014, 08:36 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,889,790 times
Reputation: 1290

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I have noticed that people are getting fed up having to drive to urban centers for work and shopping.

It was a glorious day for my area this week as one town announced the plan for fiber optic cables to be placed along one of the main thoroughfares.

Ready, willing, and cable: Is SLO County on the verge of a fiber-optic revolution? | Cover Story | New Times San Luis Obispo, CA

The main employers in my area right now are hotels, some farms, a hospital, and a mid-sized school district.

Some smaller employers are popping up though. I am interviewing for a position at a new non profit agency that is opening a facility here.

One of the community colleges here has plans to open up a branch here.

The reason companies are coming here can be heard in many other suburban communities across the nation....less strict planning policies and more affordable land and demand for jobs in the suburbs.

Now, there isn't growth in high-rises and places that turn communities into a cities. It's more like business parks being built.

I think one of the desirable parts of more modern suburban developments too is greener suburban neighborhoods that energy efficient and offer walkability and bike paths.

My area doesn't have a lot of nightlife, nor does it have a lot of things for college students, but it does offer a lot of recreational activities and still a good selection of dining. It seems that most of the people living here are young couples, families, and retirees. All living in harmony.
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Old 10-20-2014, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,514,457 times
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What urban center are you referring to? Grover Beach looks like its own small town. Either way, good for this little town trying to expand into a potential high tech job market.
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Old 10-21-2014, 04:45 AM
 
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Just hope it doesn't become a corporate suburb with high rises, manicured lawns and no affordable housing.
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Old 10-21-2014, 08:49 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,773 posts, read 54,424,430 times
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That's the best way to do it, several smaller companies/office parks. Once you get to the large corporate campuses it all changes. Here that has made the commutes bad in both directions, and to cause a lot of expansion in housing development even farther out. With Microsoft in Redmond having 40,000 employees, plus more in Bellevue, Sammamish and Issaquah many of them like to live in Seattle and do a reverse commute. The higher pay employees want to live close by, and if they have kids want the best schools, along with those from Amazon and Boeing, so the home prices here on the eastside have escalated. People with lower incomes under about $80,000 have to look for housing farther out in the east and south with an hour plus commute.
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Old 10-22-2014, 06:24 PM
 
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Suburban doesn't necessarily mean less strict planning policies. Silicon Valley is all suburb north of San Jose, and it's got some of the strictest planning policies around (basically, build no housing)
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Old 10-24-2014, 03:02 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,004,486 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Suburban doesn't necessarily mean less strict planning policies. Silicon Valley is all suburb north of San Jose, and it's got some of the strictest planning policies around (basically, build no housing)
The SF Bay area might not be representative as a function of its overly healthy economy--the cities have the power, not the developers. More representative in the area might be Dublin or Gilroy.
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Old 10-24-2014, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,658,574 times
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From what I have seen, they don't all get it right but the OP is showing us one that is. Good for them. Maybe others will follow suit. Good article.
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