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Old 10-26-2014, 11:29 PM
 
Location: Chicago - Logan Square
3,396 posts, read 6,182,219 times
Reputation: 3717

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
The big problem with flu immunization is getting people to get the vaccine.
Absolutely - but immunizations rates can be increased dramatically through well funded campaigns. Things like having vaccination days at large offices and schools (like blood donation drives) and public awareness campaigns. These things are being done to some extant, but could be expanded dramatically. Some states do very little in this area, and it shows in flu death statistics.

Anyways, my main point is that people are completely freaking out over a disease that has killed one American and fewer than 5,000 Africans. Meanwhile they could care less about easily preventable diseases that kill thousands of Americans every year - that's just plain crazy.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I'd be interested in seeing some links about the food poisoning issue.
There are a lot of different issues at play in food inspections, with a lack of adequate funding being one of them (industry lobbying to restrict and control inspections is the other big one).

Here's a quote from the article I linked to above:

Quote:
The FDA is trying, so far without success, to wrest back control of food inspection from the industry. In 2008, the agency estimated that it would need another $3 billion -- quadrupling its $1 billion annual budget for food safety -- to conduct inspections on imported and domestic food, the FDA’s former food safety chief David Acheson says.

Instead, the food industry lobbied for, and won, enactment of a law in January 2011 that expanded the role of auditors -- and foreign governments -- in vetting producers and distributors of food bound for the U.S.
Anyways, my main point again was that it is all about risk assessment, and based on cases in the US and the ability of countries like Nigeria to handle the problem, Ebola is a miniscule risk compared to many things that regularly kill thousands or tens of thousands in the US every year. And people don't bat an eye at those things because the media isn't working them into a frenzy over them.
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Old 10-27-2014, 04:45 AM
 
Location: Wartrace,TN
5,549 posts, read 8,895,144 times
Reputation: 11061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attrill View Post
Ain't gonna happen.

Ebola is a terrible bioweapon, it simply doesn't spread quickly or easily enough. There are many more transmittable viruses that live for much longer outside the human body that they could use. For example: any flu virus, smallpox, measles, SARS....

Bio-attacks have generally not been used by terrorists. There are a variety of reasons for this, but the biggest one is that it is hard to take credit for an outbreak of any disease. Terrorists want something they can clearly claim, i.e. a single big event (think 9/11). That's impossible to get with an outbreak, even if it was possible to cause one.
We agree to disagree. It doesn't spread easily enough naturally however if a group intentionally makes an effort to spread it you are talking about an entirely different thing. Think of how many buffet type eating establishments there are in out country. All they would need to do is spritz food items that are at room temp with vomit.

The theory that they wouldn't be able to take credit? If small clusters of Ebola appear in every major American city you can bet they could take credit for it. They do not have to kill a lot of people, they just need to infect enough and our economy is toast.
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Old 10-27-2014, 06:51 AM
 
1,780 posts, read 2,166,874 times
Reputation: 5877
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wartrace View Post
Really? All they would have to do is introduce their bodily fluids at salad bars or buffet places. Maybe it wouldn't spread as far and wide as in Africa but it would be effective in spreading fear.
Wartrace, you are SPOT ON!!!!

That's when Ebola would turn from "oh dear, this is scary" to "major oh *&^#" is when and if it starts spreading to the general populace via subways, restaurants, nursing homes, elementary schools, etc.

It'd probably take only a couple dozen events to pretty well shut-down our economy.
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Old 10-27-2014, 07:13 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attrill View Post
Absolutely - but immunizations rates can be increased dramatically through well funded campaigns. Things like having vaccination days at large offices and schools (like blood donation drives) and public awareness campaigns. These things are being done to some extant, but could be expanded dramatically. Some states do very little in this area, and it shows in flu death statistics.

Anyways, my main point is that people are completely freaking out over a disease that has killed one American and fewer than 5,000 Africans. Meanwhile they could care less about easily preventable diseases that kill thousands of Americans every year - that's just plain crazy.




There are a lot of different issues at play in food inspections, with a lack of adequate funding being one of them (industry lobbying to restrict and control inspections is the other big one).

Here's a quote from the article I linked to above:



Anyways, my main point again was that it is all about risk assessment, and based on cases in the US and the ability of countries like Nigeria to handle the problem, Ebola is a miniscule risk compared to many things that regularly kill thousands or tens of thousands in the US every year. And people don't bat an eye at those things because the media isn't working them into a frenzy over them.
If you have the answer to getting people to get flu vaccinations, let your state health dept. know. At one point in time, I would have said the CDC, but considering the crap they gave nurses, I now say * the CDC.

I once worked in the flu program for the Denver VNA. We went to many offices and schools. I can tell you, the schools were better takers than offices.

I know food inspections is a problem, but I won't take Bloomberg's word on a health issue. It is my experience that financial people don't understand health care.
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Old 10-27-2014, 09:49 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,830,658 times
Reputation: 9769
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
From what I've read an ebola victim gets more contagious as they get sicker. By the time they're high risk, they're too sick to go out and about.
That's the pravda, anyway. But I don't think that risk of contagion at various stages has actually been quantified. And plenty of people are out and about when they are sick with symptoms like the earlier stages of Ebola (fever, fatigue, muscle pain, headache, sore throat -- typical flu-like symptoms) , even if they shouldn't be.
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Old 10-29-2014, 04:35 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,967,271 times
Reputation: 14805
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attrill View Post
Anyways, my main point is that people are completely freaking out over a disease that has killed one American and fewer than 5,000 Africans. Meanwhile they could care less about easily preventable diseases that kill thousands of Americans every year - that's just plain crazy.
The fear is that it would spread to something much larger. Yes, it probably it won't but if... It's not the current death toll but the possibility it will turn to a larger scale epidemic.
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Old 10-29-2014, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,440 posts, read 2,762,134 times
Reputation: 16362
Ebola? Try TB. Or anti-biotic resistant infections. Or diseases carried by rats. How about sexually transmitted diseases like gonorrhea, chlamydia, or HIV? Or measles, whooping cough, chicken pox, or mumps?

Those are your urban epidemics. Not Ebola.
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Old 10-29-2014, 08:45 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
^^The thread is supposed to be about Ebola. It's well known that in Africa, Ebola outbreaks were limited until it got into the cities, particularly the low-income, high density areas of cities like Lagos, Nigeria and Monrovia, Liberia.
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Old 10-30-2014, 07:20 AM
 
2,235 posts, read 2,379,119 times
Reputation: 3048
Recent reports indicate that Ebola may be easier to transmit than previously thought.

CDC admits droplets from a sneeze could spread Ebola | New York Post
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Old 10-30-2014, 08:31 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,967,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eccotecc View Post
Recent reports indicate that Ebola may be easier to transmit than previously thought.

CDC admits droplets from a sneeze could spread Ebola | New York Post
That was mentioned a while ago
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