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Old 11-06-2014, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,214,003 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Back in the late 80s, when some people in my mom's office got computers, her boss was convinced that her computer was a toy (for games?).
Nearly all of the most powerful partners, principals and senior execs (aka the shotcallers) are so far removed from the nitty gritty of the work that they don't realize how much the job of the average entry-level/junior level worker has changed. There's still an expectation that things be done the way they did them back in their day....you know, when actual physical stock certificates existed and you would literally put them in a vault. Old habits die hard, I suppose.
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Old 11-06-2014, 03:58 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I'm not convinced it was really ever phased in.

Teleworking has been frowned upon at most of my jobs not because it makes employees less efficient, but because it's novel, and a lot of our bosses are simply resistant to change. Even when it comes to things that could be done much faster and cheaper electronically, there's resistance to doing that because that's the way these guys have been doing things since they finished college in 1967. Their view is generally: "I run things so this is the way it's going to be. Period." Many of them have a strong aversion to technology and don't understand that it exists to help them.

I have literally seen old men turn red in the face because they don't know how to attach files to emails, they get confused by desktop shortcuts, they don't know how to use the "Ctrl + F" search function, etc. How open do you think any of these guys are going to be to 20 somethings logging in remotely through VPN Client? We're living in the Obama/Digital age, but many of the people running these companies are still mentally in the Cold War era.

My mom is a little more up to speed with technology now but she's still not that comfortable with it. If there's an app she wants, she'll just wait for me to come home so I can upload it for her rather than learning to do it herself. It's really not that hard.
I'd be the first to agree that "this is how we've always done things" is powerful.

OTOH, telecommuting has its issues. When Marissa Moron or whatever her name is became head of Yahoo, she severely cut back on telecommuting, wanting people to show up in the office. Now she's not an old lady, she had a baby shortly after taking over.

As far as older people being less computer literate, computers have been used in business since the 1980s, and anyone who has kept up with their work skills should be as good as you young whippersnappers.

I worked in hospitals in the late 60s. There's a huge difference between then and now, and health care is among the most resistant to change.
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Old 11-06-2014, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,163 posts, read 29,645,043 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Despite all the hoopla about telecommuting, there are really very few jobs, and very few people, for whom 100% telecommuting is possible.
This basically only applies to some white collar workers. And since the service economy and health care jobs are increasing, and those are impossible to telecommute to, it won't have a big impact.

A subset of workers will be able to live where they want. Most people will need to be tethered, at least loosely to an office.
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Old 11-06-2014, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,163 posts, read 29,645,043 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I'd be the first to agree that "this is how we've always done things" is powerful.

OTOH, telecommuting has its issues. When Marissa Moron or whatever her name is became head of Yahoo, she severely cut back on telecommuting, wanting people to show up in the office. Now she's not an old lady, she had a baby shortly after taking over.

As far as older people being less computer literate, computers have been used in business since the 1980s, and anyone who has kept up with their work skills should be as good as you young whippersnappers.

I worked in hospitals in the late 60s. There's a huge difference between then and now, and health care is among the most resistant to change.
I spent 3 years working from home for a virtual company. We didn't have an office. There were 30 people when I started, 60 when I left and about 70 now. I got sick of working from home. Now i do it once in a while. A few times a month.
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Old 11-07-2014, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,214,003 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
This basically only applies to some white collar workers. And since the service economy and health care jobs are increasing, and those are impossible to telecommute to, it won't have a big impact.
But white collar workers are primarily the ones working in Central Business Districts. Most public transit--particularly rail transit--has a spoke and hub network that's designed to move people from the outskirts to the central business district. So if telecommuting became a lot more common, it could impact transit ridership. That's already happened in DC.
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Old 11-07-2014, 04:06 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,527,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
But white collar workers are primarily the ones working in Central Business Districts. Most public transit--particularly rail transit--has a spoke and hub network that's designed to move people from the outskirts to the central business district. So if telecommuting became a lot more common, it could impact transit ridership. That's already happened in DC.
Do you have any documentation for that statement?
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Old 11-11-2014, 11:58 AM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,003,488 times
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A side-effect of telecommuting might be sprawl*.

It goes like this: if you telecommute most of the time, but go in to the office by necessity or preference some of the time, you don't have to be close to work, but you have to be close enough to get there. You're not doing the commute every day, so you'll put up with a longer commute, but it has to be do-able.

In a place like the SF Bay area, a strong telecommuting culture could emphasize growth in places like Hollister, Monterey, Los Banos, Merced, or Sacramento because they are far enough to be cheaper, but close enough to make an occasional commute by car or train.

*in this case, "sprawl", is not pejorative, it is descriptive; the cities might not be sprawling (eg, Phoenix), but this would represent population sprawl (vs. population concentration).
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Old 11-11-2014, 07:21 PM
 
15,517 posts, read 13,509,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Do you have any documentation for that statement?
No documentation, but for anyone who lives there and commutes every day, you can see the difference.

Many fed gov workers telework two times a week, and the most popular days are Monday and Friday; the number of people using the metro is noticeably less those two days. Of course other variables factor in, but there is going to be an obvious impact on transit with numerous people teleworking.
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Old 11-12-2014, 10:29 AM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,554,265 times
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Obviously, only jobs that can be done via telecommuting will be done via telecommuting. But the number and potential of those jobs is growing. Last month I hired a designer to do a logo--they were based out of a company in Mountain View (about 100 miles southwest of me) but the designers themselves lived in Chico (about 100 miles northeast of me.) We conducted meetings via Skype and email, never meeting in person.

Cities are going to grow as population grows. But if the guy who lives in Chico and works for a company in Mountain View with customers in Sacramento doesn't have to drive all that way 5 times a week, it means less cost for transportation infrastructure, and urban growth is driven by transportation infrastructure. If information infrastructure replaces some of the need for that transportation infrastructure due to telecommuting, could it result in growth of those farther-out cities in a less car-centric way, because there is less need to facilitate the automobile for work commuting?
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Old 11-12-2014, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,214,003 times
Reputation: 11701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Do you have any documentation for that statement?

It's discussed here.

Quote:
Changing commute patterns, particularly in the form of telework and alternative work schedules, are an area of continuing investigation for Metro. Staff hope to be able to draw stronger conclusions soon from longitudinal SmarTrip data, but some good information can be taken just from surveys and broader data sources. The latest OPM surveys indicate that more than 10% of federal employees telecommute at least once a week, although only 3% spend a majority of their time away from the office. That statistic covers many employees living outside of the Washington region, however, and detailed data on non-federal workers is difficult to find, so those results are so far only suggestive. The ridership data requested by the JCC at the half-hour leval also provides some useful insights. We continue to see a decline in Friday travel relative to midweek (Wednesday) travel, which is consistent with AWS or occasional telework.
Metro ridership report - The Washington Post
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