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Old 11-12-2014, 08:10 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,166,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Yeah, those don't look like they're ghetto because they're rowhouses. Those look like ghetto because they're ghetto. The first two are in section once called the "Badlands". The last isn't as bad but isn't what I'd call the friendliest part of Philadelphia.

Here's a nicer block, in the Art Museum section:
http://goo.gl/maps/vCwhh
agreed there are nicer rowhomes and areas

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9471...W4bU-8yu6Q!2e0

and not so nice ones
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Old 11-12-2014, 08:51 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,991 posts, read 41,979,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Yeah, those don't look like they're ghetto because they're rowhouses. Those look like ghetto because they're ghetto. The first two are in section once called the "Badlands". The last isn't as bad but isn't what I'd call the friendliest part of Philadelphia.

Here's a nicer block, in the Art Museum section:
http://goo.gl/maps/vCwhh
I'm amusing the Art Museum section row houses were built at the time for a more well off demographic? While the ones P London showed were more working class? It's possible the first two were roughly similar to the last view at one time, but the first two declined for whatever reason.

My favorite Philly area I've seen by residential housing is the area west and southwest of UPenn. Most aren't rowhouses though this block has 'em:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ph...f514d88c3e58c1

more common is semi-detached, or half-double as some in PA would say, hard to see them with the trees:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9519...S0CVjgg28w!2e0

rowhomes rather than semis

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9538...BmMKBlvoeQ!2e0
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Old 11-12-2014, 08:57 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
agreed there are nicer rowhomes and areas

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9471...W4bU-8yu6Q!2e0

and not so nice ones
nice! You wouldn't realize you're more or less downtown in that view. Street looks quiet. And San Francisco, some streets that are Philly like in its narrowness:

https://www.google.com/maps/@37.8000...T9-xkWyHlA!2e0

elsewhere not so much

https://www.google.com/maps/@37.7746..._JdxfjOlRg!2e0
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Old 11-12-2014, 10:20 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,834,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I'm amusing the Art Museum section row houses were built at the time for a more well off demographic? While the ones P London showed were more working class? It's possible the first two were roughly similar to the last view at one time, but the first two declined for whatever reason.
Yes, the Art Museum section homes were always higher-end. They're larger and more elaborately decorated (but not so much as some other styles). The ones in North Philadelphia are what the Philly Rowhouse manual calls "Workingman's Homes". But North Philadelphia definitely declined since they were built. Both are mid-to-late 19th century.
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Old 11-13-2014, 01:25 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
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I live in a row house right here in Las Vegas, but they're called townhouses, but they face the street, with a patch of grass between the house and the sidewalk, similar, but unlike the Row houses of SF!

In the near East Central area of Las Vegas I call it the townhouse district, lots of circa 1970-1980 townhouse developments, my complex having 433 units. Some are completely enclosed with walls, and yet others are not, and you definitely get that Row house effect.

I was really surprised, when I moved to Las Vegas, this area of town even existed, as I never associated townhouses with this city!

Phoenix also has any number of similar townhouse complexes, with a number of the units facing the street. And Tucson!

I believe the townhouses of Phoenix/Tucson were a result of snowbirds coming down for the winter, and they didn't want to fuss with a single family home, while they were away, they wanted a turn-key place to spend their winters.
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Old 11-13-2014, 08:02 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
these philly ones are nicer, IMO

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@39.96...9NeA!2e0?hl=en

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@39.96...qwrw!2e0?hl=en

a view of the last one from above. I like the colors with the snow.



File:Art Museum area.jpg - Wikimedia Commons
Yep they look much nicer..

Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Yeah, those don't look like they're ghetto because they're rowhouses. Those look like ghetto because they're ghetto. The first two are in section once called the "Badlands". The last isn't as bad but isn't what I'd call the friendliest part of Philadelphia.

Here's a nicer block, in the Art Museum section:
http://goo.gl/maps/vCwhh
LOL exactly, they do look very very run-down

How does New built Surburbia in the UK compare to East coast USA?

https://maps.google.co.uk/maps?hl=en...,,0,12.03&z=16
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Old 11-13-2014, 08:17 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P London View Post

How does New built Surburbia in the UK compare to East coast USA?

https://maps.google.co.uk/maps?hl=en...,,0,12.03&z=16
Not similar at all to suburbia here, though you might find a few similar examples but that's not typical. Those houses aren't detached, they're semi-detached. The lots are smaller than the usual and houses closer together. A bit monotonous, all the houses have the same exact look, though that happens in development. The stone makes it looks dark. Here's one near me, the houses are actually semi-detached, though they don't look typical of it at all. Almost semi-rural couples miles out of a town.

https://maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=eas...202.95,,0,6.66

varies by region, though
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Old 11-13-2014, 08:30 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Not similar at all to suburbia here, though you might find a few similar examples but that's not typical. Those houses aren't detached, they're semi-detached. The lots are smaller than the usual and houses closer together. A bit monotonous, all the houses have the same exact look, though that happens in development. The stone makes it looks dark. Here's one near me, the houses are actually semi-detached, though they don't look typical of it at all. Almost semi-rural couples miles out of a town.

https://maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=eas...202.95,,0,6.66

varies by region, though
Looks very new, looks like the place is in the middle of nowhere.

Here is another example...

https://maps.google.co.uk/maps?hl=en...8,,0,2.73&z=15
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Old 11-13-2014, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,426 posts, read 11,929,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanObservor View Post
That'a actually not true - there are plenty that are touching and for the ones that aren't we're often talking literally a couple of inches.
I never understood how the "almost touching" houses work. I mean, unless there's a gap of at least a few feet, there's literally no way to get in between the houses to deal with peeling paint, or potentially water-damaged wood. Attached is much better than detached if those are the only two choices.

Quote:
Originally Posted by P London View Post
The Row houses in Philly are very similar to those in Northern England.
American rowhouses went through several different style periods. The oldest are Georgian (often called "colonial") and are identically styled to 18th century houses from the UK. You can find plenty of these still in Philadelphia in Old Town or Society Hill.

After this comes the "Federalist Style" - which was distinctive in its Greco-Roman influence, but on rowhouses there was often little difference, barring the more elaborate entrances.



After around 1840, the Federalist style was replaced by Italianate style - which stayed popular until the Victorian era. Over-the-Rhine, in Cincinnati, is the largest remaining Italianate neighborhood in the country. Most of the buildings there are not true rowhouses, but small apartments (often with storefronts), but you can see some rowhouses around here.

The Italianate era was followed by the true "high Victorian" era of architecture, which is most notable for the "Second Empire" variants with mansard roofs.



While this tends to be stereotyped as the era of rowhouses, in most cities outside of the Mid-Atlantic, the construction of rowhomes began to decline during this era - first for the wealthy, and finally by 1890 or so for the middle and lower classes as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I'm amusing the Art Museum section row houses were built at the time for a more well off demographic? While the ones P London showed were more working class? It's possible the first two were roughly similar to the last view at one time, but the first two declined for whatever reason.
I'm not super-familiar with every neighborhood in Philadelphia, but I know there are portions of North Philadelphia (now ghetto of course) which were built out for the wealthy. Indeed, sections of North Philly were among the first "horsecar suburbs" in the city (wealth later shifted to West Philadelphia, and then to the Northwest and out of the city on the Main Line).

Last edited by eschaton; 11-13-2014 at 09:24 AM..
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Old 11-13-2014, 08:55 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,166,272 times
Reputation: 7739
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I never understood how the "almost touching" houses work. I mean, unless there's a gap of at least a few feet, there's literally no way to get in between the houses to deal with peeling paint, or potentially water-damaged wood. Attached is much better than detached if those are the only two choices.



American rowhouses went through several different style periods. The oldest are Georgian (often called "colonial") and are identically styled to 18th century houses from the UK. You can find plenty of these still in Philadelphia in Old Town or Society Hill.

After this comes the "Federalist Style" - which was distinctive in its Greco-Roman influence, but on rowhouses there was often little difference, barring the more elaborate entrances.



After around 1840, the Federalist style was replaced by Italianate style - which stayed popular until the Victorian era. Over-the-Rhine, in Cincinnati, is the largest remaining Italianate neighborhood in the country. Most of the buildings there are not true rowhouses, but small apartments (often with storefronts), but you can see some rowhouses around here.

The Italianate era was followed by the true "high Victorian" era of architecture, which is most notable for the "Second Empire" variants with mansard roofs.



While this tends to be stereotyped as the era of rowhouses, in most cities outside of the Mid-Atlantic, the construction of rowhomes began to decline during this era - first for the wealthy, and finally by 1890 or so for the middle and lower classes as well.



I'm not super-familiar with every neighborhood in Philadelphia, but I know there are portions of North Philadelphia (now ghetto of course) which were built out for the wealthy. Indeed, sections of North Philly were among the first "horsecar suburbs" in the city (wealth later shifted to West Philadelphia, and then to the Northwest and out of the city on the Main Line.

north philly used to have many mansions, some row some with narrow spaces between them

https://www.google.com/search?q=nort...Q&ved=0CCgQsAQ

some great stock much of which is probably lost forever

Here is a more intact set of larger rows in the Art Museum area

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9654...J08RBnJgiQ!2e0

but not really rows but intertwined in vast majority row neighborhood


they are still building many rows today - a more recent example - and many more modern

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9420...iV8kHm_4yA!2e0
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