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Old 11-18-2014, 07:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
The comparably small population of Los Angeles and Sacramento before 1890 is further evidence of the point I was making upthread. The historic cores of these cities before the electric streetcar (which spurred a near nationwide movement to more detached housing) was comparably small. Presumably nearly all of these historic residential areas are either within the CBD today, or just outside it in an area which is either no longer residential, or has been rebuilt to a higher density.
Actually a lot of central business districts have a lot lower density than they did as walking cities or streetcar cities. Downtown Sacramento's central business district has a population per acre lower than most of its single-family suburban neighborhoods, except for the main jail.
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Old 11-18-2014, 08:15 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Actually a lot of central business districts have a lot lower density than they did as walking cities or streetcar cities. Downtown Sacramento's central business district has a population per acre lower than most of its single-family suburban neighborhoods, except for the main jail.
I think that's what eschaton meant by no longer residential. In any case, what was a mixed use small town became the very center of a much larger city.

London has had one of the more impressive central business district declines. Here's the population of the old city, one square mile in area. In the 1600s, it was all there was to London. It does have 350,000 workers now instead.

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Old 11-19-2014, 10:09 AM
 
Location: New Mexico via Ohio via Indiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steeps View Post
San Francisco was virtually totally rebuilt after the 1906 earthquake? No doubt better then previously. What was unique though was to choose their variety of Row homes, all their own. Underneath garages included. But just before that was the Daniel Burnham plan for a new San Francisco.
Daniel Burnham?s Twin Peaks Vision - Western Neighborhoods Project - San Francisco History His plan was seen ultimately as too expensive His plans lost in the earthquake.
Daniel Burnham also helped with plans for the National Mall in Washington DC.
Chicago also had a chance to completely rebuild better after the Great Fire of 1871. Daniel Burnham helped with their street grid and boulevards and Lakefront preserved for public use. They still look to his plan today.
Cleveland also------Burnham "Group Plan". They only did some of it but what they did was (and is) pretty terrific.
Had no idea Burnham was involved in SF.
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Old 11-20-2014, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steeps View Post
San Francisco was virtually totally rebuilt after the 1906 earthquake? No doubt better then previously. What was unique though was to choose their variety of Row homes, all their own. Underneath garages included. But just before that was the Daniel Burnham plan for a new San Francisco.
Daniel Burnham?s Twin Peaks Vision - Western Neighborhoods Project - San Francisco History His plan was seen ultimately as too expensive His plans lost in the earthquake.
Daniel Burnham also helped with plans for the National Mall in Washington DC.
Chicago also had a chance to completely rebuild better after the Great Fire of 1871. Daniel Burnham helped with their street grid and boulevards and Lakefront preserved for public use. They still look to his plan today.
All part of the "city beautiful movement" that swept around the world at the end of the 19th century. Many American cities have some remnants of "city beautiful" efforts - Burnham's visions, Olmsted parks et al.

City Beautiful movement - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 11-20-2014, 08:59 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
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Some cities had aspects of the City Beautiful plans? Some not. With Daniel Burnham's? San Francisco did not. But still turned out beautiful. Washington DC had his work on the National Mall happen. Chicago had much of its street grid system follow his original plan. Just not all and its Lakefront of public parks.
I post pictures
CHICAGO'S Grid⤵...Chicago's Lakefront⤵.. Burnham's original plan⤵

Last edited by steeps; 05-20-2015 at 05:58 PM..
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Old 11-23-2014, 07:10 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Here's the population of the old city, one square mile in area. In the 1600s, it was all there was to London. It does have 350,000 workers now instead.
The City of London's population has been in steady decline since the Fire, but that chart shows a real collapse about the time that the first underground was built. It's interesting that the world's first urban fixed rail mass transit system meant the displacement of homes with businesses.
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Old 11-27-2014, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PacoMartin View Post
The City of London's population has been in steady decline since the Fire, but that chart shows a real collapse about the time that the first underground was built. It's interesting that the world's first urban fixed rail mass transit system meant the displacement of homes with businesses.
Not really unusual.

Manhattan is a much larger area with a population of 1.6 million and a daytime population of 3.2 million. The Financial District is interesting in that in 1970 census it had a population of 700. In 2000 it was 20,000, in 2010 about 43,000 today.
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Old 01-16-2015, 11:58 AM
rah
 
Location: Oakland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steeps View Post
San Francisco was virtually totally rebuilt after the 1906 earthquake? No doubt better then previously. What was unique though was to choose their variety of Row homes, all their own. Underneath garages included.
For at least half the city, those garages weren't originally part of the buildings, and were added later once cars became widespread. Though much of the western and southern parts of the the city were built out in the mid 20 century, and always had garages included.
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Old 01-18-2015, 09:13 AM
 
Location: New York City
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San Francisco, like Boston, is built on a peninsula. The natural barrier of the water drives of land prices and encourages density. Also, San Francisco was a 19th century port, which was very labor intensive and demanded housing for stevedores and longshoremen within walking distance of the docks. Los Angeles became a major port, but it was not until the 20th century.
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