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Old 11-12-2014, 08:32 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
We will let eHow solve this issue.
What is the Difference Between a Row House and a Town House? | eHow

Basically it all depends on who you talk to, but a rowhouse is a row of connected homes that are all identical. Townhouses are connected homes that can be identical or different from each other.


A townhouse is a rowhouse that you paid too much for.
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Old 11-12-2014, 09:26 AM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I've always called semi-attached housing duplexes, but I know in some parts of the U.S. that is the term for a two-flat (e.g., something like this).

Pittsburgh duplexes come in several varieties. Earlier 19th century ones are basically traditionally styled townhouses. But later on they're simply smooshed-together foursquares, or bungalows.

Pittsburgh has many wood rowhouses, although brick is slightly more dominant overall. Several city neighborhoods (Deutschtown, Spring Garden, Troy Hill, Bloomfield, and Upper Lawrenceville) are mostly wood rowhouses. Most of these have been horribly remuddled - the wood trim long since ripped off, the wood cladding replaced with siding, and mid-20th century odd-sized (usually horizontal) windows put in. But you can find pockets of intact/restored wood rowhouses. This is one of the best remaining stands.

My mother grew up in Philly, and said even in her childhood it was illegal to build a house out of anything but brick or stone. This might be apocryphal, but in general there's still a widely-held belief in some parts of Pennsylvania that wood houses are unsafe.
Once you leave Southeastern PA, small towns through east central through central. Far less is brick. Especially when you are in the Anthracite Coal region. Which is virtually All woodframe rows and commonly known as in PA into Ohio as half-doubles. Many are very narrow.
So to me Row-homes denotes... less desired, lower class, older style, cheapest form of housing. The fact low-income subsidized housing are glorified Rows called townhouses, continues it today. Therefore big cities with mostly forms of Row homes are less inviting to me.
So for the Midwest and west to have far less Row home types was a better choice. After I lived in Chicago and Bungalow-style half the city and Brownstones and wood-framed singles in the oldest parts, still are far superior to east coast big city Rows.
Yes I know Colonial Rows and Victorian styles can be quaint and attractive. But most kinds far less to me.
San Francisco has a variety of decorative complex rows and attached housing with even garages in the first level never common in the East. So they even for me have more desirability then examples in the East.
The rest of the West other then SF had no desire to do Rows with plenty of land and so with much of its growth after the automobile, long after the colonial influence the east had.
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Old 11-12-2014, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
Well obviously someone from the West coast who lives in a city that doesn't have any rowhouses is going to have a different perspective than someone who lives in a city where rowhouses make up a majority of the housing stock. No offense but a Portlander trying to educate a Phildelphian on what rowhouses are is quite laughable. The opposite would be a Philadelphian trying to educate a Portlander on all things related to lumberjacking.
So you choose to be rude rather that click the link?

I just told you we are both right and I wasn't telling you what a row house was in Philadelphia, I am sure you know what one is and isn't.

All I am saying is that the definition for the two is basically identical and often times the difference is a regional thing or a real estate thing.

Also you are talking to someone with a degree in Architecture, I have studied extensively different types of buildings and am very well aware what a Philadelphia rowhouse is.
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Old 11-12-2014, 09:41 AM
 
Location: The City
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garages in front are less common on the east coast, ome will have a garage in the rear accessed off the alley

many things can qualify as rows, some are better and some worse
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Old 11-12-2014, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
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Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
How about those of us on the West Coast who do live (or at least frequent) places where there are rowhouses built for automobiles?
Well figuring that San Francisco is the only major city in the Western US that has rowhouses, I would think that number would be very small.
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Old 11-12-2014, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
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Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
garages in front are less common on the east coast, ome will have a garage in the rear accessed off the alley

many things can qualify as rows, some are better and some worse
I agree that they are less common as a whole but Philly does seem to have just about every different type of rowhouse style there is.
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Old 11-12-2014, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
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The type of rowhouse you would see in Portland OR today are newly built ones less than ten years old but a long time ago there were true row houses much like those one would see in San Francisco. I tried to find pictures but there don't seem to be any.

Clusters of them were in older neighborhoods. I remember back in the late 70's when I moved to Portland there were a few blocks of them right off the Pearl District and in the far NW area. They were kind of run down but they were definitely row houses. They could also be found in North Portland.

They have long been torn down to make way for new high rise apartment buildings and condos.
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Old 11-12-2014, 12:09 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steeps View Post
Once you leave Southeastern PA, small towns through east central through central. Far less is brick. Especially when you are in the Anthracite Coal region. Which is virtually All woodframe rows and commonly known as in PA into Ohio as half-doubles. Many are very narrow.
So to me Row-homes denotes... less desired, lower class, older style, cheapest form of housing.
Well, if you associate row homes with run down housing in poor places, your image makes sense. I think of a more urban place, though not all urban neighborhoods have row homes of course. I don't consider half-doubles (I'd call them semi-detached) row homes are close to them. Maybe halfway between detached housing and row houses.

Quote:
Therefore big cities with mostly forms of Row homes are less inviting to me.
So for the Midwest and west to have far less Row home types was a better choice. After I lived in Chicago and Bungalow-style half the city and Brownstones and wood-framed singles in the oldest parts, still are far superior to east coast big city Rows.
I thought brownstones are a type of rowhomes like this street or the Boston one I posted earlier in the thread. Brownstone is the name of a building material, so you must be referring to another type of building clad in brownstone. The "far superior" is a matter of personal taste than anything else.
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Old 11-12-2014, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Oceania
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post


I think a street full of row houses looks like a ghetto.

You haven't been to many cities and seen rowhouses, have you? NYC and Baltimore have lots-o-rowhouses which vary in appearance and construction on different streets. I like the big brownstones with a porch and steps. If I were to live in the city it would be the only way.

Ghettoes? Nope, choose a different city.
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Old 11-12-2014, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I thought brownstones are a type of rowhomes like this street or the Boston one I posted earlier in the thread. Brownstone is the name of a building material, so you must be referring to another type of building clad in brownstone. The "far superior" is a matter of personal taste than anything else.
In Chicago they're more typically called "Greystones" because of the Indiana limestone used. They tend to be detached.
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