U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 11-21-2014, 06:49 PM
 
Location: New York City
4,036 posts, read 8,938,981 times
Reputation: 3703

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by gottaq View Post
Will we see a trend where skyscrapers are starting to be built in suburbs? the inner-ring suburbs obviously, not the exurbs. Will inner ring suburbs eventually look like the city?
They're built because they're more cost effective and aesthetically pleasing than a sprawling, four storey office park.

However, having a tall building or two doesn't make a city. Cities are also about density of housing, amenities. Suburban towers are usually built because of proximity to a freeway. A few eventually become cities. Two that spring to mind are Bellevue, WA and Stamford, CT.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-21-2014, 06:59 PM
 
12,299 posts, read 15,190,901 times
Reputation: 8108
I don't think they are a good idea. Too much traffic (though even low rise buildings can cause that) and many suburban fire departments are not set up to deal with them, even though that village approved the construction.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2014, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,514,457 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by tpk-nyc View Post
They're built because they're more cost effective and aesthetically pleasing than a sprawling, four storey office park.

However, having a tall building or two doesn't make a city. Cities are also about density of housing, amenities. Suburban towers are usually built because of proximity to a freeway. A few eventually become cities. Two that spring to mind are Bellevue, WA and Stamford, CT.
Tysons Corner, VA is an example of how towers don't make a city. There may be quite the skyline there, but at street level it is still suburbia.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2014, 12:27 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,976 posts, read 3,456,237 times
Reputation: 2445
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Tysons Corner, VA is an example of how towers don't make a city. There may be quite the skyline there, but at street level it is still suburbia.
Check back in about 35 years on that when the Tysons "40 year plan" that started around 2010 actually gets closer to completion. Tysons is still every day very much a work in progress.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2014, 12:29 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,976 posts, read 3,456,237 times
Reputation: 2445
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
where is the current tallest in the DC area - 470 feet is pretty tall, esp in Tysons
2nd Tallest referring to the Monument being the tallest. The next three or four down are around 400 feet in Arlington.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2014, 07:27 AM
 
Location: New York City
4,036 posts, read 8,938,981 times
Reputation: 3703


I'm stuck by how much Bellevue, WA looks like a game of SimCity, which I suppose shouldn't be surprising given home many tech-types have been there.

It's on the water. It has a freeway leading to the CBD with a strong street grid and mid-sized office buildings. It's surrounds by leafy houses with larger parks visible, even a small marina. It has a art museum and a community college. They're even trying to install a transit system to link it with Seattle and the airport.

It had a population of ~13,000 in 1960 and ~134,000 today. If a suburb is going to transform into a city nowadays, that is what it will look like.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2014, 09:58 AM
 
9,860 posts, read 10,113,307 times
Reputation: 5280
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBCommenter View Post
Interesting thoughts on DFW, which is currently home for me over last 1 1/2 years.
The use of an A380 on the SYD-DFW run enables the world's longest non-stop commercial flight to run in both directions. LAX, JFK, and ORD are very limited by runways and geographic space. Maybe DFW will become more of a hub for the long haul flights from Asia and Europe.

The Earthscraper concept has been proposed for urban locqations (like the zocalo in Mexico City), but it may be a way to build striking structures near a major airport where height is impossible.

The tendency towards the construction of mega-airports in Beijing, Istanbul, Dubai, Mexico City, Madrid, and possibly in Vietnam and London (estuary airport), all of which could grow larger than Atlanta airport makes me think that we need a clear gateway for the ultra jumbo and long haul flights.

Although ATL and DFW are only 730 miles apart, I think the distance is significant, as it is already 8590 miles from SYD to DFW and 8121 miles from Hong Kong to DFW.


The top 11 USA airports for the first 8 months of 2014 are as follows.Three of them are not severely constrained by geography (DEN, DFW, and ATL). Although long haul flights tend to go to LAX, JFK, and SFO they won't be able to handle the traffic in another decade.

1. United States Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport Atlanta, Georgia United States ATL/KATL 64,451,086 Increase1.4%
4. United States Los Angeles International Airport Los Angeles, California United States LAX/KLAX 47,924,572 Increase6.5%
6. United States O'Hare International Airport Chicago, Illinois United States ORD/KORD 46,618,409 Increase4.4%
9. United States Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas United States DFW/KDFW 42,962,145 Increase5.0%
16. United States Denver International Airport Denver, Colorado United States DEN/KDEN 35,939,772 Increase2.2%
18. United States John F. Kennedy International Airport Queens, New York City, New York United States JFK/KJFK 35,635,723 Increase4.9%
21. United States San Francisco International Airport San Mateo County, California United States SFO/KSFO 31,651,495 Increase5.6%
24. United States Charlotte Douglas International Airport Charlotte, North Carolina United States CLT/KCLT 29,857,467 Increase2.4%
25. United States McCarran International Airport Las Vegas, Nevada United States LAS/KLAS 28,696,528 Increase2.4%
26. United States Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport Phoenix, Arizona United States PHX/KPHX 28,450,142 Increase4.1%
27. United States Miami International Airport Miami-Dade County, Florida United States MIA/KMIA 27,935,262 Increase1.1%
28. United States George Bush Intercontinental Airport Houston, Texas United States IAH/KIAH 27,649,219 Increase2.4%

Last edited by PacoMartin; 11-22-2014 at 10:12 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2014, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,514,457 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
Check back in about 35 years on that when the Tysons "40 year plan" that started around 2010 actually gets closer to completion. Tysons is still every day very much a work in progress.
Hopefully they will be able to transform Tysons into an urban city, but I don't have much faith it that.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2014, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,514,457 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by tpk-nyc View Post

I'm stuck by how much Bellevue, WA looks like a game of SimCity, which I suppose shouldn't be surprising given home many tech-types have been there.

It's on the water. It has a freeway leading to the CBD with a strong street grid and mid-sized office buildings. It's surrounds by leafy houses with larger parks visible, even a small marina. It has a art museum and a community college. They're even trying to install a transit system to link it with Seattle and the airport.

It had a population of ~13,000 in 1960 and ~134,000 today. If a suburb is going to transform into a city nowadays, that is what it will look like.
I never thought of it that way, but you are right, Bellevue does kind of look like a city I would have designed in Simcity, even down to the land topography and water.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-23-2014, 06:13 AM
 
3,072 posts, read 3,186,428 times
Reputation: 3685
Quote:
Originally Posted by chh View Post
The area in between Atlanta and Birmingham, and Atlanta and Greenville don't look even close to becoming a Megalopolis.
Its all hidden under the Kudzu :-)
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top