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Old 12-29-2014, 09:57 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,008 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33064

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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
No, ending sprawl does not have to negatively affect the affordability of existing housing options. And it positively affects the affordability of transportation: folks who live in transit-oriented or transit-adjacent neighborhoods have much lower transportation expenses than folks who live in more auto-centric suburbs. Meanwhile, home mortgage interest is tax-deductible while the cost of a car, insurance and gasoline is not.

Outlawing "sprawl" in the entire state of Michigan would help trigger a renaissance of Detroit like the country hasn't seen since Oregon put a stronger urban growth boundary around Portland. There is plenty of vacant space inside Detroit to hold another million or more people, quite comfortably!
Sure there is... and they'd almost all be on government assistance! There are no jobs there! That is Detroit's problem, not suburban sprawl.
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Old 12-29-2014, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,528,523 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by rzzzz View Post
Urban growth boundaries do negatively affect the affordability of housing options, though. Portland is ranked one of the least affordable cities in the country.
On what list? There are many more expensive cities in the US. The urban growth boundary for the Portland metro doesn't make housing that much more expensive because inner housing would continue to be expensive even if the metro was sprawling to the outer reaches of the valley.

The UGB has protected surrounding farm lands and forests, and has kept infrastructure much more manageable for the metro.
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Old 12-29-2014, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,659,080 times
Reputation: 4508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Sure there is... and they'd almost all be on government assistance! There are no jobs there! That is Detroit's problem, not suburban sprawl.
That's simply not true. It's just that many of the people who have jobs left the city. Otherwise, Detroit's suburbs would be suffering the same fate as the city.
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Old 12-29-2014, 11:28 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,008 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33064
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
That's simply not true. It's just that many of the people who have jobs left the city. Otherwise, Detroit's suburbs would be suffering the same fate as the city.
I don't think there are jobs for a million more people. The entire metro population has been roughly the same population since 1970. Meanwhile, the population of the US has increased by about 50%. If Detroit had grown along with the rest of the country, its metro pop would be about 6 million now instead of 4 million.
Detroit-Warren-Livonia, MI MSA Population and Components of Change -- Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University Home

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 12-29-2014 at 12:37 PM..
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Old 12-29-2014, 12:35 PM
 
1,774 posts, read 1,836,152 times
Reputation: 2701
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
On what list? There are many more expensive cities in the US. The urban growth boundary for the Portland metro doesn't make housing that much more expensive because inner housing would continue to be expensive even if the metro was sprawling to the outer reaches of the valley.

The UGB has protected surrounding farm lands and forests, and has kept infrastructure much more manageable for the metro.
Cost to by a home. High home prices, low pay. The urban growth boundary definitely does make housing expensive. I am not sure why you think otherwise.

The Most and Least Affordable Housing in America - CityLab
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Old 12-29-2014, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,659,080 times
Reputation: 4508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I don't think there are jobs for a million more people. The entire metro population has been roughly the same population since 1970. Meanwhile, the population of the US has increased by about 50%. If Detroit had grown along with the rest of the country, its metro pop would be about 6 million now instead of 4 million.
Detroit-Warren-Livonia, MI MSA Population and Components of Change -- Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University Home
I agree with that.
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Old 12-29-2014, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,514 posts, read 9,059,281 times
Reputation: 5009
Quote:
Originally Posted by I_Like_Spam View Post
Downtown Pittsburgh really fell in activity with the advent of the internet and DVD/VHS machines in the 80's/90's.

The Liberty Avenue corridor was a smutarama, a real mecca of degeneracy- peepshows, hookers, dirty movies, strip shows, massage parlors- along with supporting restaurants, newsstands, bars for the patrons and employees.

The internet ended all of this, prostitutes advertise on craigslist, people can watch porn without leaving their houses. In addition, the city fathers didn't like it. They pushed out numerous businesses out at the end of their leases and that was that.

When those folks all left, the restaurants and that closed too.

Place was left pretty dead, the only businesses really remaining from that era are a handful of gay joints.
I've heard that in the 2000's downtown Pittsburgh has seen a serious revitalization and resurgence, I've heard it's a pretty booming place, is that not true?
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Old 12-29-2014, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,528,523 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by rzzzz View Post
Cost to by a home. High home prices, low pay. The urban growth boundary definitely does make housing expensive. I am not sure why you think otherwise.

The Most and Least Affordable Housing in America - CityLab
Why would building suburban sprawl in Sherwood make home prices cheaper in inner Portland? The only thing that would make inner Portland cheaper is if you cut it up with freeways to provide access to those that live on the outskirts of sprawl.
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Old 12-29-2014, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
7,542 posts, read 8,424,081 times
Reputation: 3483
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
I've heard that in the 2000's downtown Pittsburgh has seen a serious revitalization and resurgence, I've heard it's a pretty booming place, is that not true?
Actually, there are a lot of new apartments and hotel rooms in town nowadays. There is activity, its just not the center of commerce or nightclub activity it was back in the day.

Commerce, people coming to town to shop, that's still pretty weak. Macy's is the only department store left, they closed off the top 7 shopping floors, leaving a truncated 6 story store.
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Old 12-29-2014, 06:45 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,254,190 times
Reputation: 9846
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Sure there is... and they'd almost all be on government assistance! There are no jobs there! That is Detroit's problem, not suburban sprawl.
Not really. Michigan has a pretty good economy, and there are lots of good paying jobs in Metro Detroit.
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