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Old 12-01-2014, 04:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
When they decided that every city street, no matter how big or small had to be prioritized
to the automobile, it pretty much put the nail in the coffin for downtown America.

When you make it hard to go anywhere without a car, then naturally 99% of people will drive.
Not really. There were horses and carriages before cars and people didn't travel much downtown for daily needs besides maybe work and that is why the nightlife and fun are often located elsewhere. They shopped at small local stores and had some items delivered and delivery wasn't an problem because there was an little home accessory called an house wife.
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Old 12-01-2014, 05:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Not really. There were horses and carriages before cars and people didn't travel much downtown for daily needs besides maybe work and that is why the nightlife and fun are often located elsewhere. They shopped at small local stores and had some items delivered and delivery wasn't an problem because there was an little home accessory called an house wife.
Nightlife and fun are located elsewhere? Where exactly would that be but the downtown?
The suburbs? I don't think so. There was no such thing as suburban sprawl back then.
Low density sprawl is possible only when everyone has a car, and there were few if any private cars back then.

The downtowns were a lot more lively back then because that's where the streetcars went. When you don't have a car then naturally it is very convenient, time and cost-effective to have all your shopping and entertainment needs located in the same area (the downtown).
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Old 12-01-2014, 05:38 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
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Not all downtowns are dead... in fact most have degrees of revival. Declines of the 60s 70s reversed and many people moving back and living in downtowns of Big US cities. Chicago is a prime example. So much new construction and especially new housing being built. Much high end skyscraper living in what I call....a Manhattanizing of Chicago's downtown....10s of thousands each few years. Here are some pictures of downtown and next door new housing River North
and Near North, some of the gold Coast, last picture that isn't new...... ⤵

Last edited by steeps; 12-13-2014 at 11:18 AM..
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Old 12-01-2014, 05:39 PM
 
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Pretty much every city has a nightlife area outside of the downtown.
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Old 12-01-2014, 05:49 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
I agree with Denver (well, and the rest of them too!) I think the perception of downtown Denver throughout metro Denver is that it's fun, nice and even if people live way out in the 'burbs, they still have a certain pride in downtown Denver.

Comparing that to downtown Kansas City, you find that people in the KC suburbs tend to be very anti-downtown (go there and you'll get killed!!), it's rather cut off by a freeway loop, many surrounding neighborhoods suffer from decay and high crime, and overall, people just don't seem to care if it's a dead downtown. That said, downtown KC has improved in the past decade from its worst days.
Yes, that's what some of my extended family think of downtown Omaha, too. Omaha, too, has made a lot of improvements in its d/t in the past, oh, 20 years or so. They have horse-drawn carriages clomping around and such, trendy restaurants and boutiquey places. AFAIK, no real dept. stores or other "practical" places, though.
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Old 12-01-2014, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Yes, that's what some of my extended family think of downtown Omaha, too. Omaha, too, has made a lot of improvements in its d/t in the past, oh, 20 years or so. They have horse-drawn carriages clomping around and such, trendy restaurants and boutiquey places. AFAIK, no real dept. stores or other "practical" places, though.
Typically, once that kind of retail leaves, it's almost impossible (currently) to bring it back.
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Old 12-01-2014, 06:22 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
Typically, once that kind of retail leaves, it's almost impossible (currently) to bring it back.
Eh. I feel like I've heard of some examples of cities that have had practical shops return to their downtown. But perhaps they had few and it increased rather than losing it all together.

Medium sized cities seem to be at a bigger disadvantage at regrowing their downtown, as they don't the same volume and have malls or other shopping centers a short distance away. And some city neighborhoods nearby might be enough to handle the "entertainment" demand. Generally the cities with the largest amount of practical shops downtown have a large population right nearby if not in downtown. It matches well with the list of cities with the highest density central areas — New York City, San Francisco, Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, Washington DC. Seattle does well despite not being dense.

Last edited by nei; 12-01-2014 at 07:09 PM..
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Old 12-01-2014, 06:39 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
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Oh no ...... other big cities do well too in downtown shopping too then that list alone.... But I better not mention one city I refer to in particular... with 2 première shopping streets still maintaining a high end one with even vertical Malls and its original shopping street with a original 1800s department store. Now a Macy's .....even a Target opening in another former department store in a historic building architecturally. In the heart of its downtown. That I was surprised to see LOL. The rest of the stores on that street are basically ones you Would see in a actual neighborhood Mall.
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Old 12-01-2014, 06:43 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steeps View Post
Oh no ...... other big cities do well too in downtown shopping too then that list alone.... But I better not list one in particular...
I'm not saying others don't do well. But the ones on that list are often considered the best downtowns in the US, at least if big is better. It's usually what turns up in city vs city forum threads, at least.
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Old 12-01-2014, 07:07 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I'm not saying others don't do well. But the ones on that list are often considered the best downtowns in the US, at least if big is better. It's usually what turns up in city vs city forum threads, at least.
Ok I will mention the City...CHICAGO having 2 premier shopping streets downtown. Its Original State Street and its High end one North Michigan Ave now renamed the "Magnificent Mile". It rates up with Fifth Ave NYC and Rodeo Drive LA. But ....US NEWS TRAVEL ...list CHICAGO #2 behind NYC as the top 2 shopping Destinations 8 Best Shopping Destinations in the USA | U.S. News Travel and Michigan Ave Chicago ...in particular In the nation after Rodeo Drive LA.
America's Best Shopping Streets | U.S. News Travel
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