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Old 12-01-2014, 03:01 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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From another thread, a poster from Finland describing Spanish cities said Fins would find the lack of greenery in Spanish cities very different from what they're used to. But then he mentioned that Finnish cities lack trees in the old parts, almost taking that for granted.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariete View Post
Maybe it's because that utilities and sanitation is expensive and the city limits limited, so they want to keep all hoods very dense. But would be a culture shock living in those cities as Finnish cities are so green. Ok, the old parts of Helsinki don't have roadside trees, but like here, wherever you turn there's at least a tree visible, and parks are never far away. https://www.google.fi/maps/@60.16688...yGrQgXLgmA!2e0
But it's good, as people here have a "regular" or "their" park, and don't go to another hood's park.
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Old 12-01-2014, 03:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
go out some ways into the suburbs of Paris and there are trees and houses with yards, some of the homes detached.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Pa...0b82c3688c9460
Yes, way out in the Paris suburbs there are trees, but in America fly over most American CITIES and there is millions of trees right next to the homes, between homes and along commercial streets.

I am not talking about Europe only. My two week trip through South America showed cities and towns with an incredible lack of trees.
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Old 12-01-2014, 03:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Office Politics View Post
I do a lot of traveling and one thing that divides American Cities with the rest of the world is the large number of large trees in urban areas. Fly into MOST American Cities and you will see a sea of large trees. Most American cities have houses with yards with grass, trees and flowers and lots of land in-between left as woods or fields.

Fly into cities in Asia, Europe and Latin America and the development is very dense with little room for trees- outside of parks. Sure there are some trees but they are planted, generally small, and cover a small area.

Why is this the case?
Lack of basic common sense. If most Asian and European cities simply planted more trees and various forms of foliage throughout their cities, they would eliminate more than 50% of smog and other toxic particles in the air.
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Old 12-01-2014, 04:23 PM
 
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It is also great to have an tree nearby. They can provide shade, and frankly some green space.
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Old 12-01-2014, 05:57 PM
 
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The average urban tree cover in the USA is 27%.
The highest is Atlanta with 35%.

other assorted cities in the USA:
Houston 30%
Seattle 25%
NYC 25%
LA 18%
SF 12%
Chicago 11%

in Europe:
Stockholm 70%
Helsinki 57%
Berlin 44%
Warsaw 32%
Vienna 29%
Lisbon 23%
Copenhagen 21%
Paris 20%
Budapest 20%
London 10%
Rome 8%
Madrid 6%
Amsterdam 4%
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Old 12-01-2014, 06:25 PM
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Location: Foot of the Rockies
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^^I don't know where you got your numbers, but these are supposedly from National Geographic:

Pittsburgh: 42%
Portland, OR: 30%
Pittsburgh Trees > Portland Trees - The 412 - May 2014
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Old 12-01-2014, 06:41 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Yea, something seems off about those numbers. San Francisco is more treed than Chicago*?! Do the numbers use city limits or something else? The European numbers are probably counting parkland and some outlying neighborhoods. I can't get google maps to draw Stockholm city limits, but it's obvious that

https://maps.google.com/maps?t=h&sll...classic&dg=opt

if the limits are large enough, you'll gets lots of forest for Stockholm. The NYC is 20% parkland, assuming most of that is tree-covered, not much of the rest of the city has tree cover.

*Might make sense if city parkland is included as Golden Gate Park + Presido are larger parks than Chicago parks and the city limits of San Francisco are much smaller. So, even if the city of neighborhoods of San Francisco have far fewer trees than Chicago's (at least if street trees are a good gauge), the greater park % makes up for it. Note Golden Gate Park was originally treeless — it was grassland.
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Old 12-01-2014, 06:44 PM
 
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SF has a higher percentage of urban tree cover in that list.
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Old 12-01-2014, 06:46 PM
 
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Transportation costs. When you have to lug yourself and all your groceries, furniture, etc. around by horse, you build dense cities. (Boston, San Francisco, and a few other very old U.S. cities look like European cities.) Even villages in Europe look like little cities.

The automobile made it possible to live more spread out, which leaves room for trees.
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Old 12-01-2014, 06:46 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rzzzz View Post
SF has a higher percentage of urban tree cover in that list.
Yea, I was commenting that I found that surprising, and guessed at an explanation. I made a typo in the above post.
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