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Old 12-03-2014, 02:29 PM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,829 posts, read 21,132,956 times
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I never thought of this growing up but trees that you must pay to maintain are expensive. My sister owns a house with 7 large trees. Just a trim job on them that kicks the can down the road cost $2k. To remove problem trees is $3000 EACH. That's a lot of tacos lol

Europeans tend to be more frugal. Many hand dry clothes w/o a dryer, drive stick shift cars w/o air conditioning, etc.
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Old 12-03-2014, 02:32 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
As I said before, often you won't really see trees from the streets as they are surrounded by building, like here for instance, also in Cordoba:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/C%...f1d2e8108456c3
There's not many trees in that view even behing buildings.
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Old 12-03-2014, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,499,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Yes, Portland is a rather environmentally progressive city, and of course the climate supports the green spirit
That is true, if the trees aren't green enough for you, then the moss growing on everything is.
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Old 12-03-2014, 02:41 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,366 posts, read 19,297,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
There's not many trees in that view even behing buildings.
I disagree. Plus, compare downtown Cordoba to downtown Pittsburgh:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Pi...f915a15aa21b34

Nor is Cordoba dry desert or something like that, just see the huge suburbs north of the city.

https://www.google.com/maps/@37.9112...wurz3w6YEA!2e0
https://www.google.com/maps/@37.9145...2g2wqyJmJw!2e0
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Old 12-03-2014, 03:14 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
I disagree. Plus, compare downtown Cordoba to downtown Pittsburgh:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Pi...f915a15aa21b34
Well no, downtowns won't have much greenery. That's why I thought the criticisms of European city centers don't have much greenery sound odd. Why would you expec them to? But go out, and a lot of Cordoba blocks have no greenery within the residential areas. Here, for example:

https://maps.google.com/maps?ll=37.8...05659&t=h&z=18

A few street trees, nothing behind the buildings. You'd have to go to the edge of the city find something other than mostly building covered areas. Pittsburgh is very different as soon as you leave downtown. Compare the Cordoba view to Cologne:


https://maps.google.com/maps?ll=50.9...05659&t=h&z=18
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Old 12-03-2014, 03:27 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,366 posts, read 19,297,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Well no, downtowns won't have much greenery. That's why I thought the criticisms of European city centers don't have much greenery sound odd. Why would you expec them to? But go out, and a lot of Cordoba blocks have no greenery within the residential areas. Here, for example:

https://maps.google.com/maps?ll=37.8...05659&t=h&z=18

A few street trees, nothing behind the buildings. You'd have to go to the edge of the city find something other than mostly building covered areas. Pittsburgh is very different as soon as you leave downtown. Compare the Cordoba view to Cologne:


https://maps.google.com/maps?ll=50.9...05659&t=h&z=18
The part of town you picked is obviously some rather new project, and indeed it looks ugly, and it is not the rule in Cordoba. Just go slightly to the West and you will find much more green:

https://www.google.com/maps/@37.8795.../data=!3m1!1e3

And right to the East and North there are parks:

https://www.google.com/maps/@37.8829.../data=!3m1!1e3



In Pittsburgh there are also parts of town that have very little green:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4387.../data=!3m1!1e3
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4277.../data=!3m1!1e3
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Old 12-03-2014, 03:36 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,366 posts, read 19,297,224 times
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Judging from the number of new apartment blocks Cordoba is probably growing a lot and has to provide lots of apartments to her new citizens. It is the same in my city, lots of growth, thus lots of residential high rises. There is simply not enough space to build tens of thousands of new houses all over the place. Plus, many people just rent and don't buy. That is common in European cities.

Most European cities date back at least to the Middle Ages, some before BC. Except for those destroyed in wars, their cores are still more or less like centuries or millennia back. Even when a building has to be torn down, it is usually replaced by another dense building, not a single-family home, which would be out of place there. Most Europeans like dense living. It is cool to live in dense downtown Malaga

https://www.google.com/maps/@36.7217.../data=!3m1!1e3

When you feel like you need to see green, you just walk 5 minutes to the south and find huge parks and a few minutes further south the Mediterranean coast

Most European cities are pretty green, for instance these three German cities:

Kassel:
http://static.panoramio.com/photos/o...l/93524562.jpg
Siegen:
https://static.panoramio.com.storage...l/21520372.jpg
Bonn:
http://www.bonn.de/imperia/md/images...rs_2009_19.jpg

Last edited by Neuling; 12-03-2014 at 04:15 PM..
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Old 12-03-2014, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Montana
522 posts, read 555,054 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Office Politics View Post
Fly over Paris and the only areas with big trees is in parks, the rest is apartment buildings for as far as the eye can see.

Fly over Washington DC and there is millions of trees and a good number of people live in Single Family Homes with yards and lots of room for greenery.
But you have to remember that the DC metro area spans several states, and a lot of people commute (ie. an hour in the car). In Europe you live closer to the city center and take public transport to work. This is the trade-off. American cities, IMO, generally have suburban sprawl while Europeans are privy to urban living.
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