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Old 12-03-2014, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,595,082 times
Reputation: 7830

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Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
Not important to who?
Annexation in the example given was not subject to a vote of the people in the area being annexed. The annexation was involuntary with respect to the people living and owning property in the annexed area. Annexation was a grab for control and property taxes by the city of Austin.

People living in unincorporated areas near other cities near Austin sought to have their property added to the extra-territorial jurisdiction of the other cities - not because they wanted to someday be annexed by the other cities but rather as a defensive mechanism to prevent the city of Austin from being able to annex them in the future.


Perhaps you should go back and read the prior posts or take that up with Komeht.
I don't need to take it up with Komeht, I am taking it up with you, this thread isn't about annexing so I am wondering why it is something you are talking about.

I don't know what the law is in Texas but up in Oregon and Washington, those that live in the area being annexed need to have a vote, even if it is only one person that live in the area trying to be annexed.

How about you try and stick to the topic which would be if you could build a city, what would it look like? I am curious what your ideal city would look like.
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Old 12-03-2014, 06:58 PM
 
2,702 posts, read 3,758,820 times
Reputation: 4520
It would certainly NOT be like the crap cities we have now....
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Old 12-03-2014, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
642 posts, read 492,893 times
Reputation: 546
Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
I disagree completely - my City would be amazing amounts of fun - every street a fantastic place to congregate and people watch, little need for car, lots of extra time and money to spend on leisure activity, more time spent with families, less devote to being in cars.
I guess it depends on your idea of fun. My idea is showing off my Street Rod getting into a Street Drag Race. There would be a place in my city for street racing legally.
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Old 12-03-2014, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
642 posts, read 492,893 times
Reputation: 546
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunsetMission View Post
Kohmet is right. Parking lots and freeways do not make a city a "playground" but a ghost town.
No freeways, but some parking lots for LOITERING, playing Frisbee, and parking your Street Rod with the hood up to show off it's motor.

I'm a "Car Culture" guy.
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Old 12-03-2014, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
642 posts, read 492,893 times
Reputation: 546
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Honestly, I would probably design a city like the ones I do in Simcity. A city where a third of the residents drive because the city is very walkable and has insanely great rail transit, and an extensive bus system. As well as ferry system if my city has a lot of water.
SimCity is definitely geared toward that kind of planning. I've tried in vain to get a heavy FREIGHT rail system to go through my cities in SimCity 2013 and never succeeded. Best I can do it get passenger rail, blah!
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Old 12-03-2014, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
642 posts, read 492,893 times
Reputation: 546
Quote:
Originally Posted by cab591 View Post
Well hopefully Satellite 12 doesn't start a revolution!

It was pretty in-depth, and their solution for delivering goods was electric-assisted hand carts. Basically a pallet jack with a small motor, they're used in factories and warehouses all the time. One guy can move two tons of product at a nice walking speed. Bike couriers can deliver parcels and letters between point A and point B, and a majority of the people would get around by walking and public transit.
A better idea for this would be forklifts and Segways.
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Old 12-03-2014, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Prepperland
13,763 posts, read 9,877,999 times
Reputation: 9897
Quote:
Originally Posted by drum bro View Post
me and a guy on another forum a few months ago thought of i city thats in the shape of a bagel.

it would have a underground bike path that would be a circle and there would be a subway next to it. the middle would be forest and have a bunch of gardens, same with the outside.
I second the vote, but for a "double bagel" city.

O.K.... a "dual ring" village, in a hexagonal array with other DRVs, to form a city of rings.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ring_life
What is a "Dual Ring Village"?

The characteristics that distinguish the Ring Village from other forms of high population density housing are:

1. Dual ring (doughnut in a doughnut)
2. Stacked continuous balconies (multiple pathways around, up, down)
3. Central park (round)
4. Ground level (pedestrian friendly) reserved for enterprise, commercial, etc
5. Upper levels reserved for homes and small offices
6. Single gateway to control access
7. Close proximity to resources, parkland, social contact, and vocation
8. Ring street between the dual ring buildings
9. Rooftop gardens and balcony planters, for additional life bearing surface area / habitat

Other variations:
[] Depending on security concerns, the outer ring perimeter can be designed as a barrier wall.

[] The central park can have enhanced security by limiting access from ground level enterprises. If access is limited by a gate, there's a reduced threat to children left playing unattended. And if the inner gate is 180 degrees opposite of the main gate, the potential for a "snatch and run" is reduced.

[] Ring street can be configured as pedestrian mall, or serve as internal parking space for a "Farmer's Market".

[] The hexagonal array of DRVs utilizes a 3 way roundabout intersection. The curving roads and roundabouts impose a speed limit, while roundabouts avoid stops, boosting average speed. Additional parking is provided at each roundabout, via parking garages, adjacent to the dual rings, and linked by pedestrian bridges.

[] Where ring villages accumulate into a ring city, an underground transit corridor may be incorporated into planning. Other transportation variations include streetcar, suspended cable car, elevated monorail, and canals (if topology favors it).

Engineering Benefits -

Curved wall - resistant to racking forces, earthquakes; encloses more area with less material; spills wind; increased strength.

A sturdy barrier wall can resist storm surge, flash floods, mudslides, flying debris, etc.

A high barrier wall protects from flash floods, and other unwanted intrusions. Multiple rings assure that no single breach is a catastrophe for all.

A non-flammable wall protects from heat, fire, etc.

The ring building, subdivided into apartments, provides more straight walls for more efficient use of space - unlike domes. And the ring has fewer exposed surfaces (2 out of six), reducing energy consumption for maintaining comfort. (Worst case : three surfaces exposed)
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Old 12-03-2014, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
642 posts, read 492,893 times
Reputation: 546
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
This is why I play Sim City! I love designing my own city and building it exactly as I see fit.

Side question, is there a town your fictional city most closely resembles? Your city sounds like a high end suburb of a medium sized (2-4 million) Metropolitan area.
Actually there is a suburban town that very much impressed me with it's layout: Hopkins, MN as it was back in the 1970's.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FfXD...0&html5=1&hd=1
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Old 12-03-2014, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
642 posts, read 492,893 times
Reputation: 546
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetgraphics View Post
I second the vote, but for a "double bagel" city.

O.K.... a "dual ring" village, in a hexagonal array with other DRVs, to form a city of rings.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ring_life
What is a "Dual Ring Village"?

The characteristics that distinguish the Ring Village from other forms of high population density housing are:

1. Dual ring (doughnut in a doughnut)
2. Stacked continuous balconies (multiple pathways around, up, down)
3. Central park (round)
4. Ground level (pedestrian friendly) reserved for enterprise, commercial, etc
5. Upper levels reserved for homes and small offices
6. Single gateway to control access
7. Close proximity to resources, parkland, social contact, and vocation
8. Ring street between the dual ring buildings
9. Rooftop gardens and balcony planters, for additional life bearing surface area / habitat

Other variations:
[] Depending on security concerns, the outer ring perimeter can be designed as a barrier wall.

[] The central park can have enhanced security by limiting access from ground level enterprises. If access is limited by a gate, there's a reduced threat to children left playing unattended. And if the inner gate is 180 degrees opposite of the main gate, the potential for a "snatch and run" is reduced.

[] Ring street can be configured as pedestrian mall, or serve as internal parking space for a "Farmer's Market".

[] The hexagonal array of DRVs utilizes a 3 way roundabout intersection. The curving roads and roundabouts impose a speed limit, while roundabouts avoid stops, boosting average speed. Additional parking is provided at each roundabout, via parking garages, adjacent to the dual rings, and linked by pedestrian bridges.

[] Where ring villages accumulate into a ring city, an underground transit corridor may be incorporated into planning. Other transportation variations include streetcar, suspended cable car, elevated monorail, and canals (if topology favors it).

Engineering Benefits -

Curved wall - resistant to racking forces, earthquakes; encloses more area with less material; spills wind; increased strength.

A sturdy barrier wall can resist storm surge, flash floods, mudslides, flying debris, etc.

A high barrier wall protects from flash floods, and other unwanted intrusions. Multiple rings assure that no single breach is a catastrophe for all.

A non-flammable wall protects from heat, fire, etc.

The ring building, subdivided into apartments, provides more straight walls for more efficient use of space - unlike domes. And the ring has fewer exposed surfaces (2 out of six), reducing energy consumption for maintaining comfort. (Worst case : three surfaces exposed)
Your city design makes for a good Space Station City too.
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Old 12-04-2014, 02:00 AM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
9,744 posts, read 18,924,573 times
Reputation: 8622
Houses built with porches just within loud speaking distance to the sidewalks in front. A grassy or garden area between the sidewalks and the road. All garages in back of the houses but on street parking, too, although only on one side to keep the streets pretty narrow. Trees in the front yards to shade the sidewalks. Small shops at the every other corner of each block. About every eight short blocks would be an avenue of shops, all small ones locally owned. Bus transit lines, trams and light rail going along on these shopping avenues. A "slow lane" along these shopping avenues for bicycles, golf carts, donkey carts, whatever folks want to use that's slower and smaller than cars. Scattered parks and benches for resting while walking. Nice bathrooms in each park. Single family residences of mixed sizes along with several duplexes, four-plexes and maybe even a six-plex, but not many of those. A few big fancy houses with staff's quarters. Schools within walking distance if possible. A university extension. A nice geographical feature such as a beach nearby, too. The whole town, including most of the housing areas, shouldn't be more than two or three miles across. No tall buildings, although up to four stories along the shopping avenue with an apartment building or two up on the shopping avenue would be allowable. Scattered public art installations.

All locally owned business. You want all the money spent in town to stay in town as much as possible. Surrounded by farms to feed the town with a thriving farmer's market for access to fresh vegetables. A small town slaughterhouse, too, for access to non-big business meats. You want a healthy town so you need healthy food.

A basic health clinic for residents of town. Free health care for all residents and a collective between several neighboring towns to provide for a regional hospital. Free basic health care for all residents of the region.

A river nearby for a hydro-electric dam along with a lot of solar power as well. In an area of adequate rainfall so that water isn't an issue.

A central gathering area of some type. Maybe a big covered pavilion or some sort of large multi-purpose conference room. Maybe a traditional "town green" in the center of town.
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