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Old 12-05-2014, 03:26 PM
 
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As I have been looking for the right job after college I have discovered that the largest community near me with 46,000 population has a very limited selection of jobs and is not a diverse market. However, looking at communities with 75,000 population and up (that weren't suburbs) seemed to have a diverse market. There was more need for attorneys, doctors, engineers, social workers, etc...

That population could also be two dense cities next to each other.
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Old 12-05-2014, 03:31 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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That's called synergy or critical mass. It will vary according the local economy. Some areas are one industry towns. If that leaves the devastation lasts for decades.
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Old 12-05-2014, 03:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
That's called synergy or critical mass. It will vary according the local economy. Some areas are one industry towns. If that leaves the devastation lasts for decades.
To clarify, critical mass is referring to more population can mean a more diverse economy?

For instance, college towns in CA like Santa Cruz and Davis and San Luis Obispo have two to three sectors that hire alot. Davis and SLO it's more government services, education, and agriculture. Santa Cruz it's government services, education, and tourism.

However, Monterey-Seaside metro compared to Santa Cruz is much more diverse and some people even will live in Monterey and commute to Salinas for work.

In San Luis Obispo, I know many college graduates who found work in Santa Maria because there was more employers in agriculture, engineering, architecture, medical, and government services.

I am surprised that having a university nearby doesn't mean there are more jobs. In fact, I think it makes it harder to get jobs because graduates are fighting for what few jobs there are.
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Old 12-05-2014, 03:55 PM
 
Location: The City
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1,697 people generally

give or take one or two people
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Old 12-05-2014, 04:08 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
To clarify, critical mass is referring to more population can mean a more diverse economy?

For instance, college towns in CA like Santa Cruz and Davis and San Luis Obispo have two to three sectors that hire alot. Davis and SLO it's more government services, education, and agriculture. Santa Cruz it's government services, education, and tourism.

However, Monterey-Seaside metro compared to Santa Cruz is much more diverse and some people even will live in Monterey and commute to Salinas for work.

In San Luis Obispo, I know many college graduates who found work in Santa Maria because there was more employers in agriculture, engineering, architecture, medical, and government services.

I am surprised that having a university nearby doesn't mean there are more jobs. In fact, I think it makes it harder to get jobs because graduates are fighting for what few jobs there are.
More customers/clients/consumers.

Companies like McDonald's have figuring that out down to a science. So does Wal-Mart, for that matter. A university? What jobs are you talking about? Research, only in certain cases. You noted some, with the consequent jobs. That's almost a chicken and egg question-which came first, the jobs or the university.
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Old 12-05-2014, 04:36 PM
 
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Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
More customers/clients/consumers.

Companies like McDonald's have figuring that out down to a science. So does Wal-Mart, for that matter. A university? What jobs are you talking about? Research, only in certain cases. You noted some, with the consequent jobs. That's almost a chicken and egg question-which came first, the jobs or the university.
I would think employers would want to locate near a university because they get a fresh pick of low pay entry level workers and also the ability to train them as interns. But then again consumers and clients aren't nearby if it's in a small town.

Outside of engineering, education, and agricultural jobs though you have to leave the area for jobs. Which is what I am going to do. If I wanted to stay in my area, I'd need to get a master's degree. Even then, it's still slim pickings for jobs that require a master's degree here.
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Old 12-05-2014, 04:41 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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Originally Posted by the city View Post
I would think employers would want to locate near a university because they get a fresh pick of low pay entry level workers and also the ability to train them as interns. But then again consumers and clients aren't nearby if it's in a small town.
What type of jobs are you talking about? Keep in mind that 3/4 of adults aren't college graduates. In fact a degree is an impediment in many jobs.

Employers tend to locate near markets. Availability of workers also plays a part.

Why are prisons generally being built in rural areas with few other job offerings? Two reasons plus one you may not think of.
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Old 12-05-2014, 04:58 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,903,846 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
What type of jobs are you talking about? Keep in mind that 3/4 of adults aren't college graduates. In fact a degree is an impediment in many jobs.

Employers tend to locate near markets. Availability of workers also plays a part.

Why are prisons generally being built in rural areas with few other job offerings? Two reasons plus one you may not think of.
Well, I suppose in larger communities (75,000 pop+) you tend to see more firms (large companies) which then you see more marketing, sales, recruiting, and human resource jobs. Even if the firm is not specialized in selling a product, you tend to have some business jobs at a large firm.

Also, specialized doctors tend to be more in urban areas. City planners are typically more common in urban environments and anything related to development and redevelopment.

We have a prison and a mental hospital in my area and it's in a more rural area.

I think universities, prisons, and mental hospitals are establishments that can locate outside urban areas because of available land and other reasons.

But inside the town, there are about 2-3 800-1,000 employee engineering firms.
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Old 12-09-2014, 03:57 AM
 
Location: france
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There are some small country or isolate islands like Monaco or Feroe islands who seems have a good economy. But maybe it's an outsider picture?
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Old 12-09-2014, 09:11 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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I don't think there is any direct relationship between population and diverse economy. You can have a tiny town with only 1,000 residents with a few apartments, stores, and gas stations plus a large employer, in manufacturing, for example, and everyone commutes from nearby towns/cities. A city like ours of 45,000 has no diversity of economy, with only two strip malls.
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