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Old 12-25-2014, 08:24 AM
 
3,836 posts, read 4,715,489 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Oh burying an elevated highway wouldn't solve any commuter problems and would definitely be very expensive. In the case of Austin, it might with development connecting the two sides and causing more development to happen on the eastern side.

But that is an if, and I don't know Austin at all, but I do know burying that freeway would be very costly for nothing guaranteed.
Not a tunnel, cut and cap - much cheaper and far more dependable technology than tunneling. And the return on investment is huge because it opens up 100+ acres of central Austin real estate for development and liberates much much more than that from having unfortunate location of being next to an elevated noisy and polluting freeway.

It's basically a win-win-win scenario that requires a modest up-front investment that pays dividends in returns.
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Old 12-25-2014, 09:03 AM
 
4,068 posts, read 3,097,353 times
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Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
Not a tunnel, cut and cap - much cheaper and far more dependable technology than tunneling. And the return on investment is huge because it opens up 100+ acres of central Austin real estate for development and liberates much much more than that from having unfortunate location of being next to an elevated noisy and polluting freeway.

It's basically a win-win-win scenario that requires a modest up-front investment that pays dividends in returns.
Following what has been posted in the real estate and house forums over the years, it sounds like houses in Texas are not built with basements. If housing is not constructed with basements (a form of cut and cap) in Texas then how are they going to do the same with an entire roadway? There must be some serious reason that precludes buildings from having basements in Texas. Anyone care to elaborate?
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Old 12-25-2014, 09:42 AM
 
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Originally Posted by AtkinsonDan View Post
Following what has been posted in the real estate and house forums over the years, it sounds like houses in Texas are not built with basements. If housing is not constructed with basements (a form of cut and cap) in Texas then how are they going to do the same with an entire roadway? There must be some serious reason that precludes buildings from having basements in Texas. Anyone care to elaborate?
Has to do with climate, not substrate. Austin lies on a bed of limestone. It's very easy to excavate and done all the time on buildings large and small and things like roads projects. In fact there's a large tunnel project in final stage of completing right now called the Waller Creek Tunnel (look it up if you like). That tunnel parallels I-35 only a couple of blocks to the west through downtown.
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Old 12-25-2014, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,523,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
Not a tunnel, cut and cap - much cheaper and far more dependable technology than tunneling. And the return on investment is huge because it opens up 100+ acres of central Austin real estate for development and liberates much much more than that from having unfortunate location of being next to an elevated noisy and polluting freeway.

It's basically a win-win-win scenario that requires a modest up-front investment that pays dividends in returns.
Cut and cap creates a tunnel, unless you think cut and cap means something else.
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Old 12-25-2014, 10:20 AM
 
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Cut and cap creates a tunnel, unless you think cut and cap means something else.
Cur and cap excavates from the surface as opposed to tunneling under ground. Much different technology and while orders of magnitude less complicated to do.
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Old 12-25-2014, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
Cur and cap excavates from the surface as opposed to tunneling under ground. Much different technology and while orders of magnitude less complicated to do.
You are aware that cut and cap creates a tunnel, right?
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Old 12-25-2014, 11:19 AM
 
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
You are aware that cut and cap creates a tunnel, right?
Ok, no need to explain this to you again. You either understand my point or you don't.
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Old 12-25-2014, 08:04 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
Ok. . .kinda bizarre to be talking about urban blight since we're well past that era now. . .nevertheless - none of that has anything to do with the problems presented by urban freeways.
There are many small, medium, and large cities plagued by urban blight, maybe you should travel a bit.
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Old 12-25-2014, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
Ok, no need to explain this to you again. You either understand my point or you don't.
I understand what you are saying, just not sure you understood what I was saying.
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Old 12-26-2014, 01:13 AM
 
548 posts, read 637,894 times
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Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
And the return on investment is huge because it opens up 100+ acres of central Austin real estate for development and liberates much much more than that from having unfortunate location of being next to an elevated noisy and polluting freeway.

It's basically a win-win-win scenario that requires a modest up-front investment that pays dividends in returns.
THis is pretty much what happened after the Big Dig in Boston, where I-93 through downtown was changed from elevated to underground.

To be fair, the investment in that project was not 'modest', but I suspect in Austin the work would be easier (not right next to the ocean and with a thicket of subway lines, building foundations and poorly-mapped old utility pipes and tunnels), and perhaps with less overhead for corruption...
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