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Old 01-04-2015, 05:11 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059

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When you think about it, the OP's premise makes sense. Many Millennials are still in high school, for Pity's sake, and the oldest of them are in their early 30s. (This depends somewhat on where you draw the line, 1980 vs 1982; I've seen both.) Gen Xers are in the meat of their careers, if not at the top of their earnings powers, well on their way there. They have the money, they can qualify for loans easily. The oldest Boomers are retiring, the youngest are now turning 51,still peaking, but most are "going down the western slope" as we say here in CO.
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Old 01-04-2015, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Lynn, MA
325 posts, read 402,195 times
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Think I'll do my part and open a grunge music/rollerblading/ beanie baby emporium.
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Old 01-04-2015, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,514,457 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weird Tolkienish Figure View Post
Think I'll do my part and open a grunge music/rollerblading/ beanie baby emporium.
Sweet, I will have a place to strut my beanie baby made flannel shirt out on the rollerblade rink.
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Old 01-04-2015, 11:56 PM
 
6,353 posts, read 5,157,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Gen X is and always has been too small to matter. We've been spit on by the so-called "Greatest Generation" and often enough the "Boomers" for most of our existence, and the Millennials basically ignore us (but then, they ignore the others as well). You want our help now? Go fish.
Poor baby.

My neighborhood is filling up with affluent Gen X'ers who are doing fine. If they are feeling spit upon (goodness!), they haven't told me.
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Old 01-05-2015, 06:58 AM
 
Location: Where my bills arrive
8,117 posts, read 9,561,313 times
Reputation: 8119
Am I a Boomer or Gen X'er who knows, I do know that living in the burbs works for me. No desire to relocate to the nearest city..
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Old 01-05-2015, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,920,328 times
Reputation: 10536
I'm a late Xer (born in 1979) and I don't see a dramatic difference in opinions between the younger side of Xers and Millennials. The primary difference seems to be we are a bit more established in our careers, and more likely to have kids. Plus there are less of us. But I don't think the generation as a whole has markedly more suburban aspirations.
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Old 01-05-2015, 12:44 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I'm a late Xer (born in 1979) and I don't see a dramatic difference in opinions between the younger side of Xers and Millennials. The primary difference seems to be we are a bit more established in our careers, and more likely to have kids. Plus there are less of us. But I don't think the generation as a whole has markedly more suburban aspirations.
Well, there aren't any hard and fast divisions, despite what this "pop" stuff in the media says. With the Boomers, the differentiation was made on birth numbers. The birth rate started to shoot up in 1946, reached its peak in 1957, and the number of births stayed above 4,000,000 through 1964. After that, the absolute number of births started to fall. I'm not sure when they picked up again. Around the time DH and I got married (1980), there was talk of the increasing # of births, the so-called "echo boom" babies, who were later renamed the Millennials.

ETA: The number of births did not reach 4,000,000 again until 1989. The birth rate (births per 1000 population) went above 15 in 1977, and above 16 briefly in 1989. Now it's at its lowest ever, 13.4.
http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0005067.html
http://money.cnn.com/2013/09/06/news...irth-rate-low/
https://www.cia.gov/library/publicat.../2054rank.html

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 01-05-2015 at 12:57 PM..
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