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Old 01-05-2015, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,560,873 times
Reputation: 7830

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Not really. In Chicago the stadiums are not downtown. Some are in rough parts of the city Untied Center(or the old Chicago stadium). Some in more working class(or formerly) parts Comiskey park(old/ new). Some in more high end places(Wrigley Field) and some downtown or just outside of downtown. The truth is that there are jobs and places to go all over town and both people who live in the city as well as people who live in the burbs use the freeways to get around.

People moved out to the burbs because they wanted more space and newer housing. The house I grew up in was built in 1900. The kitchen had no dishwasher and there was an total of 3 electrical outlets in it. Want to run all those 1950ies electrical appliances in the kitchen good luck.

Bedrooms were small and only had one electrical outlet for the whole room. There was one bathroom with no shower. Oh and the bathroom had no electrical outlet no electric razor for you....

This is what older housing is and why it is so hard for it to compete with newer housing. Newer housing is better at fitting modern lifestyles. Also the burb wasn't that far out but they had lawns about twice as big and that is an big difference.
Sorry, I wasn't speaking of Chicago specifically when I mentioned stadiums, that was more of a general comment.

Sounds like the house you grew up in was in desperate need of a renovation. Though you get people like me who grew up in those suburbs you longed for that want nothing more than to live in a healthy inner city neighborhood. Portland is full of amazing inner city neighborhoods for a reason.
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Old 01-05-2015, 05:52 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 84,010,700 times
Reputation: 18050
Quote:
Originally Posted by I_Like_Spam View Post
How does it hurt the inner city neighborhoods to have cultural and sports activities in the core of the city, that middle class people are willing to attend? Are more white knuckle suburban drivers cruising through their areas to attend an event a benefit to them?
Guess he/she wants companies to move out to where work force is like most cities more and more.
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Old 01-05-2015, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,560,873 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
Guess he/she wants companies to move out to where work force is like most cities more and more.
Or cities can make their inner city housing stock more appealing to those businesses moving into downtowns to make the city much more liveable.
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Old 01-05-2015, 06:18 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,864,073 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Or cities can make their inner city housing stock more appealing to those businesses moving into downtowns to make the city much more liveable.
Most cities have no problems with businesses moving into downtown unless there is some major problems going on. However making housing more appealing often involves tearing it down which isn't going to happen so long as someone owns it or lives in it(for the most part). Also the cost of renovating housing can be high. I mean for that old house you would have needed an electrician, an plumber, someone to fix or replace the plaster that could get cracked, new cabinets for the kitchen and so on. It would have been tens of thousands of dollars worth of work that someone who is looking for an new house could simply avoid by buying something new to begin with.
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Old 01-05-2015, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,560,873 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Most cities have no problems with businesses moving into downtown unless there is some major problems going on. However making housing more appealing often involves tearing it down which isn't going to happen so long as someone owns it or lives in it(for the most part). Also the cost of renovating housing can be high. I mean for that old house you would have needed an electrician, an plumber, someone to fix or replace the plaster that could get cracked, new cabinets for the kitchen and so on. It would have been tens of thousands of dollars worth of work that someone who is looking for an new house could simply avoid by buying something new to begin with.
Depends, my sister in law and her husband were able to get a good rate and a tax credit that allowed them to renovate their inner city home. The house is a perfect size for their family and has more than enough backyard room.

Heck, sometimes old houses need to be torn down and something new built on the lot, that happens as well. There are solutions for these problems.
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Old 01-05-2015, 06:35 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,037,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post

People moved out to the burbs because they wanted more space and newer housing. The house I grew up in was built in 1900. The kitchen had no dishwasher and there was an total of 3 electrical outlets in it. Want to run all those 1950ies electrical appliances in the kitchen good luck.

Bedrooms were small and only had one electrical outlet for the whole room. There was one bathroom with no shower. Oh and the bathroom had no electrical outlet no electric razor for you....
I've rented in a number of homes from that era and visited them. Never seen a scarcity of electrical outlets, nor a lack of a shower. Though one place had a shower over a claw foot tub, the rest normal showers.
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Old 01-05-2015, 06:39 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,037,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Having grown up in an inner city neighborhood of Chicago. The back yard is too small for any kid over the age of 5. Kids use a lot of space playing. We ran all up and down the alleyways and streets because you could not get active enough in the back yard. Parks were useless because they were blocks away. The few times I spent in the burbs were an real blast. I could play tackle foot ball. I could run around the yard.
Makes sense, I don't think of those thing as much as I wasn't that athletic and a bit of a bookworm as a kid. As for a park, I have a friend who grew up in a middle-class but denser city neighborhood than yours and had a large park nearby who would use it often once he was an older child. He was much more positive about his city neighborhood than you are with yours.
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Old 01-05-2015, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
7,542 posts, read 8,431,287 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I've rented in a number of homes from that era and visited them. Never seen a scarcity of electrical outlets, nor a lack of a shower. .

The thing with houses built 1900 and before is that they all had to be retrofitted for electricity and often water as well.

The number of electric outlets varies depending on the ability and bankroll of the owner during that era.
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Old 01-06-2015, 07:55 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,020 posts, read 102,689,903 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago76 View Post

There is no doubt that if loans were issued in a more equitable manner, then the degree of sprawl, renewal, and highway construction we experienced from 1945-1975 would never have occurred.
Actually, there's plenty of doubt. You have no idea what else might have been different. That's not to say I think what was done was right.
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Old 01-06-2015, 08:00 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,020 posts, read 102,689,903 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
So I assume your parents moved you to the suburbs at the age of 5 because it wasn't enough space for you to play? And why were your parents letting a small child under the age of 5 run up and down alleyways?

Yes, someone who prefers that suburban 4 car garage, swimming pool lifestyle probably isn't going to like living in a Chicago apartment, nor would I expect them to like it.
That crack about another poster's parents is completely, totally, unequivocally inappropriate.

Who the neck has a 4 car garage?
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