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Old 01-07-2015, 12:50 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
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Urban freeways are already set and built, there is not much need to build as many urban freeways anymore.
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Old 01-07-2015, 02:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post


Urban freeways are already set and built, there is not much need to build as many urban freeways anymore.
The question isn't just about new ones, but about the cost-benefit of maintaining or replacing existing ones. We have to ask ourselves if they are worth the financial cost of upkeep, who carries that cost and externalized burdens, who benefits from its existence, and if there are alternatives that would make us better off.

And I think it is important to note that, as our suburbs have reached full build-out, we're also facing the same situation for many freeways that cut through those suburbs.
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Old 01-07-2015, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Originally Posted by I_Like_Spam View Post
Fair enough, but most of the city neighborhoods which have freeways passing through have plenty of urban prairies as well. Not a lot of people want to live there, and it doesn't have much to do about the freeway either.

Maybe it would be better for urban planners to put future freeways in between neighborhoods, instead of straight through the center of them, particularly if a neighborhood has cohesion.
That's because the freeways started killing healthy neighborhoods. For example, I live in Oakland CA. One of many cities that killed black neighborhoods by building freeways.

Additionally, the thriving areas aren't near the freeway, or even visible from the freeway. If your view of Oakland is just what you see from the freeway, you'd think it was ugly, industrial and there was nothing going on. Designing roads to make it as easy as possible to get around the city without seeing it makes it hard to activate the neighborhoods.
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Old 01-07-2015, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,168 posts, read 29,665,044 times
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Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
That is untrue. I've known many people who've bought an existing home with a VA loan. The house did have to meet certain standards, you know, like having a back AND front door, little safety features like that.
And be in a white neighborhood. Black veterans need not apply (till the 70s or so).
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