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Old 01-05-2015, 05:25 PM
 
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Dead malls are growing due to:
1) Oversaturation of brick & mortar retail per capita: most are/were built with overly positive prognosis (a typical developer mentality) in growth of buying power.
2) Decline in average household size and average household income (declining / stagnant) while key necessities of living cut into discretionary spending
3) Changes in social behavioral buying patterns (internet and better quality warehouse clubs like Costco or outlet malls)
4) End result municipalities tendency to chase false panacea of development of any type to supposedly add tax revenue to their coffers. It starts a cycle of abandonment outward or to best designed nodal shopping concentrations which cater to their particular market and the poorly sited malls or those in poor socio economic areas (high cost of loss prevention) get left as they are more trouble than they are worth to operate a brick and mortar business.
5) The continuing bifurcation in retail that corresponds to the national dynamic. Low (masses) and High tends to do well normalized to a region and those retailers targeting the mid range of most any market are consolidating brick and mortar, going on line when possible, redoing their business models, or evaporating.
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Old 01-05-2015, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ciceropolo View Post
Dead malls are growing due to:
1
New malls are also replacing the need for old malls.

Here in Pittsburgh, Allegheny Center Mall died after the opening of Ross Park and was converted to office space and has been successful in its new role.

Century 3 is dying after the opening of the Homestead Waterfront and renovations at South Hills Village.

Parkway Center Mall, however, died as its parking lot continued to sink and shoppers had to climb a mountain to get to the stores, it was built on landfill
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Old 01-05-2015, 07:45 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
That is often times the case when a developer redevelops an old mall. Bridgeport Village just outside of Portland looks like a little urban district but in the end it is just an outdoor mall.
The Domain is not a redevelopment of an old mall. Sad to say it actually started out this way.
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Old 01-05-2015, 07:49 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
I-35 cuts a football field sized swatch through the heart of Austin and condemns about another amount of that land on either side to low intensity uses (adult book stores, gas stations, lingerie modeling studios, fast food joints, etc. tend to be the businesses willing to locate there) Compare that with the value and contribution to the community of the neighborhoods that are several blocks off the freeway and you'll see a world of difference.
Contribution to what community? You speak nonsense. A few blocks further and you would be condemning them as "suburbs" because they aren't in the central business district. The CBD is not "the community" and the people in those neighborhoods don't owe anything to anyone else.

Please define "low intensity use". Seems like a meaningless term that doesn't assist in describing anything.

Last edited by IC_deLight; 01-05-2015 at 08:02 PM..
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Old 01-05-2015, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
7,542 posts, read 8,427,551 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
I-35 cuts a football field sized swatch through the heart of Austin and condemns about another amount of that land on either side to low intensity uses (adult book stores, gas stations, lingerie modeling studios, fast food joints, etc. tend to be the businesses willing to locate there) Compare that with the value and contribution to the community of the neighborhoods that are several blocks off the freeway and you'll see a world of difference.
Gasoline stations, restaurants, book stores and lingerie modeling are all things that people need or are things people like to do for recreation.

They got to be somewhere, what's wrong with downtown Austin? Don't people eat or drive there?

Not every venture has to be high brow, low brow, low intensity commerce is also needed.
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Old 01-06-2015, 12:09 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,544,210 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
The Domain is not a redevelopment of an old mall. Sad to say it actually started out this way.
I am unfamiliar with the Domain, it is probably similar to Bridgeport Village which is also a new development. It is basically an outdoor mall designed to look like an urban village.
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Old 01-06-2015, 02:30 AM
 
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I am unfamiliar with the Domain, it is probably similar to Bridgeport Village which is also a new development. It is basically an outdoor mall designed to look like an urban village.
The Domain | Austin Continued | Austin Texas
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Old 01-06-2015, 07:39 AM
 
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I think the reason some malls are dying has a lot more to do with the growing popularity of online retail than with any kind of urban trend.
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Old 01-06-2015, 12:17 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,726,844 times
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Shopping malls are pretty inconvenient, unnecessary amount of walking and usually bad parking.

Typical suburban shopping areas with a couple big box stores next to each other and some restaurants in the same parking lot (like this one) that we have literally all over the country are very convenient and most would rather shop their than some shopping mall.
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Old 01-11-2015, 05:32 PM
 
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Here's a comprehensive list of them DeadMalls.com
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