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Old 01-12-2015, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 15,353,700 times
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What's killing off malls are not the tourist/hipster-oriented TND CBDs, but online shopping. Compare them:

TNDs: Parking often a pain (not to mention driving), walking a pain in cold / heat and for many disabled or lazy people, most expensive, limited though varied selection, but best VISITOR experience
Suburban malls: Parking free but many complain about walking long distances to the shops, driving a pain, moderate prices, wide selection, varying visitor experience
Online: Parking and walking non-issues, cheapest, you can select almost anything, but no real visitor experience
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Old 01-13-2015, 09:03 AM
 
56,744 posts, read 81,061,259 times
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Around here, we either have this: Destiny USA | Your Shopping, Dining, and Entertainment Destination
Destiny USA - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

or this in regards to malls: ShoppingTown Mall
Shoppingtown Mall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Great Northern Mall | Home
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_N...Mall_(New_York)

There were as many as 7 or 8 at one time, with some becoming plazas/open shopping centers later.

Here's a great website about the subject: DeadMalls.com
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Old 01-13-2015, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,272 posts, read 26,279,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
Shopping malls are pretty inconvenient, unnecessary amount of walking and usually bad parking.
Isn't that a good thing?
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Old 01-13-2015, 10:42 AM
 
358 posts, read 360,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
Shopping malls are pretty inconvenient, unnecessary amount of walking and usually bad parking.

Typical suburban shopping areas with a couple big box stores next to each other and some restaurants in the same parking lot (like this one) that we have literally all over the country are very convenient and most would rather shop their than some shopping mall.
Your example appears to have just as bad parking and require just as much walking as a mall. ??
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Old 01-13-2015, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,306,894 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Dying suburban malls are often times great locations for new urbanism projects due to the large amount of land available and the ability to create a new street grid.
BelMar, in Lakewood, CO is a great example of this. It replaced an old mall.

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Old 01-13-2015, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
2,610 posts, read 3,766,137 times
Reputation: 1616
Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
What's killing off malls are not the tourist/hipster-oriented TND CBDs, but online shopping. Compare them:

TNDs: Parking often a pain (not to mention driving), walking a pain in cold / heat and for many disabled or lazy people, most expensive, limited though varied selection, but best VISITOR experience
Suburban malls: Parking free but many complain about walking long distances to the shops, driving a pain, moderate prices, wide selection, varying visitor experience
Online: Parking and walking non-issues, cheapest, you can select almost anything, but no real visitor experience
I agree online shopping is part of it but doesn't he fact that TND retail districts and CBDs seem to be growing in number suggest they have an advantage over suburban malls?
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Old 01-13-2015, 01:05 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,735,011 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Isn't that a good thing?
Not really, too inconvenient. if i wanna walk a lot i'll go for a walk or go walk on a treadmill.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete. View Post
Your example appears to have just as bad parking and require just as much walking as a mall. ??
Lol, no it doesnt.

not even close actually.

much easier parking at big box stores and suburban shopping centers, usually each store has its own parking area so you can park closer to the door (compared to the mall)

plus at big box stores and suburban shopping centers you just simply walk into the door, not the case at a shopping mall.
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Old 01-14-2015, 09:09 AM
 
1,915 posts, read 2,053,048 times
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Default Malls replaced by Big Box Stores

Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
Not really, too inconvenient. if i wanna walk a lot i'll go for a walk or go walk on a treadmill.



Lol, no it doesnt.

not even close actually.

much easier parking at big box stores and suburban shopping centers, usually each store has its own parking area so you can park closer to the door (compared to the mall)

plus at big box stores and suburban shopping centers you just simply walk into the door, not the case at a shopping mall.
In other words the "decline" of the shopping mall (multiple small stores and one or up to several "anchor" larger stores) is due to the growth of the "Big Box Store".

A Home Depot or a Lowe's as part of a shopping mall with more upscale boutiques does not make economic sense. Nor does a Wal-Mart, or even a Bed Bath and Beyond, for that matter.

How odd that the anti-suburban Luddites are cheering an event that one would rationally think from their point of view is even worse. Then again, I have long learned that Luddites are not rational.
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Old 01-14-2015, 02:38 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,024 posts, read 102,689,903 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by NickB1967 View Post
In other words the "decline" of the shopping mall (multiple small stores and one or up to several "anchor" larger stores) is due to the growth of the "Big Box Store".

A Home Depot or a Lowe's as part of a shopping mall with more upscale boutiques does not make economic sense. Nor does a Wal-Mart, or even a Bed Bath and Beyond, for that matter.

How odd that the anti-suburban Luddites are cheering an event that one would rationally think from their point of view is even worse. Then again, I have long learned that Luddites are not rational.
You might think that, and I would agree, however, the other big mall in Boulder (other than Pearl St. which we've heard about on here) 29th St., is anchored by a Home Depot. It's not an indoor enclosed mall; I don't know what cutesy name it has, but it's a bunch of stores that open to the outside, with lots of parking, b/c we do like our parking no matter what we say!
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ev...8bec3a!6m1!1e1
Twenty Ninth Street (Boulder) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 01-14-2015, 02:53 PM
 
1,915 posts, read 2,053,048 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
You might think that, and I would agree, however, the other big mall in Boulder (other than Pearl St. which we've heard about on here) 29th St., is anchored by a Home Depot. It's not an indoor enclosed mall; I don't know what cutesy name it has, but it's a bunch of stores that open to the outside, with lots of parking, b/c we do like our parking no matter what we say!
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ev...8bec3a!6m1!1e1
Twenty Ninth Street (Boulder) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Of course we like our parking. Contrary to self-anointed "experts", our idea of a shopping experience is not the Soviet GUM (pronounced "Goom"). We like to load up with more than a bag with a variety of items and come and go as we please doing it.

I am glad to hear some malls can be anchored by Home Depots or Wal-Marts, although I suspect they are downscale.
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