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Old 01-16-2015, 12:59 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
So what about suburban malls? Do people with disabilities or people with children not go to these places due to not being able to park in front of each store?
This issue was brought up in regards people not willing to walk 2X2 miles, calling them "lazy". For people with disabilities there are handicapped parking places; some malls have spots for people with young kids. When my kids were little, I tried to park as close as I could to the mall entrance. There weren't so many of these open-air malls at the time. A lot of the spots in strip malls right in front of the stores are only 15-30 min parking as well.
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Old 01-16-2015, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
This issue was brought up in regards people not willing to walk 2X2 miles, calling them "lazy". For people with disabilities there are handicapped parking places; some malls have spots for people with young kids. When my kids were little, I tried to park as close as I could to the mall entrance. There weren't so many of these open-air malls at the time. A lot of the spots in strip malls right in front of the stores are only 15-30 min parking as well.
Your traditional suburban mall requires one to walk a long distance for their shopping needs even if they get to park right in front of the mall entrance.

What spots do some malls have for people with young kids? Not sure what you are referring to here.
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Old 01-16-2015, 01:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Your traditional suburban mall requires one to walk a long distance for their shopping needs even if they get to park right in front of the mall entrance.
In an enclosed, air conditioned, wheelchair accommodating, and regularly cleaned and policed environment, this is not such a problem. Out in "the elements", both natural and man-made (thugs, trash, etc.), it is more of a problem.

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
What spots do some malls have for people with young kids? Not sure what you are referring to here.
This is common in many malls where I live. There are even sometimes spaces for pregnant mommies to be.
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Old 01-16-2015, 02:17 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,859,209 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickB1967 View Post
In an enclosed, air conditioned, wheelchair accommodating, and regularly cleaned and policed environment, this is not such a problem. Out in "the elements", both natural and man-made (thugs, trash, etc.), it is more of a problem.


That along with lots of benches inside of the mall. Pedestrian malls and downtown districts tend to lack benches because they attract the homeless and vagrants esp. in big cities.

The other thing enclosed malls do is surround the building with an moat of parking and put anchor chains on the outside corners of the mall. This reduces the amount of walking needed to get to the big stores. You just have to walk around to get to the smaller stores inside or another store if you choose to. In downtown districts there is no guarantee that parking is anywhere near the door to the larger store.

This is also why the few successful pedestrian malls have one thing in common: Short only a very few blocks long. More than about 3-4 blocks and it is getting impractical for anyone to walk it.
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Old 01-16-2015, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickB1967 View Post
In an enclosed, air conditioned, wheelchair accommodating, and regularly cleaned and policed environment, this is not such a problem. Out in "the elements", both natural and man-made (thugs, trash, etc.), it is more of a problem.



This is common in many malls where I live. There are even sometimes spaces for pregnant mommies to be.
Where do you live? It sounds like you live near a dangerous downtown that no one would want to walk more that a hundred feet in.
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Old 01-16-2015, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by chirack View Post
That along with lots of benches inside of the mall. Pedestrian malls and downtown districts tend to lack benches because they attract the homeless and vagrants esp. in big cities.

The other thing enclosed malls do is surround the building with an moat of parking and put anchor chains on the outside corners of the mall. This reduces the amount of walking needed to get to the big stores. You just have to walk around to get to the smaller stores inside or another store if you choose to. In downtown districts there is no guarantee that parking is anywhere near the door to the larger store.

This is also why the few successful pedestrian malls have one thing in common: Short only a very few blocks long. More than about 3-4 blocks and it is getting impractical for anyone to walk it.
That is a completely false statement. One could find plazas in downtown Portland to sit that aren't full of homeless and other vagrants. Heck, finding a place to sit in NYC was actually an easy thing to do because there were people of all walks of life sitting in the city. This idea that there is no where to sit in a downtown is typically a false notion unless you live near a city that has a very unfriendly downtown that no one actually visits to begin with.
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Old 01-16-2015, 02:50 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Where do you live? It sounds like you live near a dangerous downtown that no one would want to walk more that a hundred feet in.
How so?
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Old 01-16-2015, 02:52 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,967,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
That is a completely false statement. One could find plazas in downtown Portland to sit that aren't full of homeless and other vagrants. Heck, finding a place to sit in NYC was actually an easy thing to do because there were people of all walks of life sitting in the city. This idea that there is no where to sit in a downtown is typically a false notion unless you live near a city that has a very unfriendly downtown that no one actually visits to begin with.
The benches of the downtown of my town often have homeless on them, even though it's fairly well used for its size. The city tried to solve it by removing them, but it resulted in a public outcry. [I disagreed with removing the benches as well]
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Old 01-16-2015, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
How so?
Based on this sentence.

Quote:
Out in "the elements", both natural and man-made (thugs, trash, etc.), it is more of a problem.
Sounds like this person doesn't like being outdoors because it is full of bad weather, thugs, trash, and so on.
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Old 01-16-2015, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,523,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The benches of the downtown of my town often have homeless on them, even though it's fairly well used for its size. The city tried to solve it by removing them, but it resulted in a public outcry. [I disagreed with removing the benches as well]
It makes more sense to deal with the homelessness issue than it does just to remove where they sleep. Though they could always remove the benches and replace them with seats that make it much harder for one to want to lay down on it.
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