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Old 01-16-2015, 03:27 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,985 posts, read 102,540,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Any snowy urban area with a high volume of pedestrians clears snow quickly from sidewalks. And in this region, pour salt. New York City is great at removing evidence of snowstorms, at least on the sidewalks. Snow often gets replaced with salt.
You have never been in Colorado when it snows, I see. First, the sidewalks are the responsibility of the owners of the property, and they have until 24 hours after the last flake falls to clear their walks. (Now that I've said this, I'm not sure it is entirely true of business owners, but that's what it is for residential property.) However, having just looked this up for Boulder, it looks like the same is true for any property owner.
https://bouldercolorado.gov/pages/no...heir-sidewalks
As you see in this link, "Generally, like other Front Range communities, the city [Boulder] does not usually plow residential streets since most snow usually melts within a day or two and because residential street plowing would significantly increase costs, impacting other high-priority services."
Of course, anyone walking to shopping would have to walk through residential areas as well.
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Old 01-16-2015, 04:25 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
You have never been in Colorado when it snows, I see. First, the sidewalks are the responsibility of the owners of the property, and they have until 24 hours after the last flake falls to clear their walks. (Now that I've said this, I'm not sure it is entirely true of business owners, but that's what it is for residential property.) However, having just looked this up for Boulder, it looks like the same is true for any property owner.
https://bouldercolorado.gov/pages/no...heir-sidewalks
As you see in this link, "Generally, like other Front Range communities, the city [Boulder] does not usually plow residential streets since most snow usually melts within a day or two and because residential street plowing would significantly increase costs, impacting other high-priority services."
Of course, anyone walking to shopping would have to walk through residential areas as well.
No, however the same goes elsewhere: snow clearance varies by region, so difficulty of saying, biking with snow is different here than in Colorado. It seems like they don't plow much there, unlike here and perhaps don't salk aggressively (I saw liquid water when it was 10F )* Well, in my experience any busier street near or in downtown gets cleared of snow rather quickly. I was walking around downtown Albany a few days ago after a few inches of snow and snow was cleared quickly not that long afterward.

*One of my biggest issues of biking in the winter was salt worries which damage a frame faster than a car. I noticed you never mentioned that but any bicyclist here would be well aware of that.

Most snow melts after a day or two? Wimpy winters you got out there. Hasn't been above freezing except for a few hours since the 6th.
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Old 01-16-2015, 04:25 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohhwanderlust View Post
Lol, even 2x2 miles would be considered too much to walk? Hopefully people aren't that lazy.
What does 2x2 miles mean? A 2 mile walk? That's at least 40 minutes.
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Old 01-16-2015, 04:27 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post

This is also why the few successful pedestrian malls have one thing in common: Short only a very few blocks long. More than about 3-4 blocks and it is getting impractical for anyone to walk it.
If a parallel street is open to traffic and has off street parking, the length shouldn't matter much.
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Old 01-16-2015, 04:50 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,985 posts, read 102,540,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
No, however the same goes elsewhere: snow clearance varies by region, so difficulty of saying, biking with snow is different here than in Colorado. It seems like they don't plow much there, unlike here and perhaps don't salk aggressively (I saw liquid water when it was 10F )* Well, in my experience any busier street near or in downtown gets cleared of snow rather quickly. I was walking around downtown Albany a few days ago after a few inches of snow and snow was cleared quickly not that long afterward.

*One of my biggest issues of biking in the winter was salt worries which damage a frame faster than a car. I noticed you never mentioned that but any bicyclist here would be well aware of that.

Most snow melts after a day or two? Wimpy winters you got out there. Hasn't been above freezing except for a few hours since the 6th.
No, they don't salt much here, that's why I don't mention it. Actually, that bit about most snow melting in a day or two is the city of Boulder's hype. We still have quite a bit of snow here from our snows from Christmas Day through Dec. 30, 19.8" total. It was 62 here today; 57 yesterday. This time of year is often warm and dry. It'll snow some more in March.
Boulder's 2014 weather review: Year was snowy, but temperature average - Boulder Daily Camera
Weather History for Broomfield, CO | Weather Underground
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Old 01-16-2015, 04:55 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
No, they don't salt much here, that's why I don't mention it. Actually, that bit about most snow melting in a day or two is the city of Boulder's hype. We still have quite a bit of snow here from our snows from Christmas Day through Dec. 30, 19.8" total. It was 62 here today; 57 yesterday. This time of year is often warm and dry. It'll snow some more in March.
Boulder's 2014 weather review: Year was snowy, but temperature average - Boulder Daily Camera
Weather History for Broomfield, CO | Weather Underground
As an off topic aside, I suspect Colorado gets more of a reputation for cold and snow because it gets so much of it out of the traditional "winter" (early December to early March for me). Someone from the Northeast might think: it's snowing in April! If it's that cold and snowy in April, imagine what it must be in January! Other issue, is a lot of transplants are from places like Texas or California rather than say, Massachusetts.

December here was rainy and mild for winter, then it switched to very cold and mostly dry. Might get out my bicycle if it gets more tolerable (say 30F or warmer).
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Old 01-16-2015, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,893 posts, read 7,653,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
No, but you know, some of these "urbanists" don't stop to think about people with disabilities, or even people carting along small children or the able bodied but perhaps slower and less energetic elderly. It's mostly about young, physically fit people, particularly young men who don't have to worry so much about their physical safety as women, either.
Sorry to back up here, and it's not my intention to target you, because you didn't exactly say what I'm about to gripe about, but...

Auto-oriented development is OK, because "that's what people want," and it doesn't matter that it's not easily accessible to some people with disabilities that prevent them from driving. But urban/walkable development is not OK, because it might not be easily accessible to people with disabilities that hinder their mobility?!?

Then, you also have a segment of the elderly population who may be able-bodied, and enjoy walking, who probably shouldn't be behind the wheel of a car, anymore.
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Old 01-16-2015, 05:08 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,264,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Based on this sentence.

Sounds like this person doesn't like being outdoors because it is full of bad weather, thugs, trash, and so on.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Or he happens to be more bothered by bad weather than you or I am. And perceives crime as a worse problem than others. Everyone has different tastes and perceptions you can't make assumptions on their places or choices from things like that.

People need to be outside more often. Being indoors all day,
the lack of exercise, lack of exposure to the sun is not good for one's health.

But North Americans are homebodies in general and will have any excuse to not go outside.
Its too hot, its too cold, its raining its snowing, its too sunny blah blah. Part of it has to do
with the built environment that makes it so unpleasant to be outside, but which is why
that has to be improved. Really, really improved.
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Old 01-16-2015, 05:10 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,985 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
Sorry to back up here, and it's not my intention to target you, because you didn't exactly say what I'm about to gripe about, but...

Auto-oriented development is OK, because "that's what people want," and it doesn't matter that it's not easily accessible to some people with disabilities that prevent them from driving. But urban/walkable development is not OK, because it might not be easily accessible to people with disabilities that hinder their mobility?!?

Then, you also have a segment of the elderly population who may be able-bodied, and enjoy walking, who probably shouldn't be behind the wheel of a car, anymore.
Those folks probably shouldn't be out walking by themselves, either, b/c they might get lost. It happens.
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Old 01-16-2015, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,504,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
Those folks probably shouldn't be out walking by themselves, either, b/c they might get lost. It happens.
There is a little old man who has been walking past my work for years, he gets so much exercise for all the walking he does around downtown, though I would never want to see him in a car because that would probably be deadly, but I would never tell him not to enjoy walking around downtown.
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