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Old 01-10-2015, 04:28 PM
 
3,262 posts, read 3,001,812 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
Why would it not be good for people who work there? When your business revenue doubles or triples as a result of pedestrianization you would be stupid not to want it. Fortunately the Times Square business owners were not stupid and voted unanimously to make the pedestrian changes permanent. Pedestrian zones allow exemptions or have one or two lanes for local commercial vehicles so that is rarely an issue.
What works in super-dense, most-people-walk/subway-everywhere Manhattan isn't necessarily applicable to the rest of the country, or heck, even the rest of NYC.

Not saying it wouldn't work, just try to find an example from somewhere more normal.
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Old 01-10-2015, 04:32 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,978 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
Why would it not be good for people who work there? When your business revenue doubles or triples as a result of pedestrianization you would be stupid not to want it. Fortunately the Times Square business owners were not stupid and voted unanimously to make the pedestrian changes permanent. Pedestrian zones allow exemptions or have one or two lanes for local commercial vehicles so that is rarely an issue. Times Square is now one of the Top 10 retail destinations in the world.
In Boulder, it can be bad for people who work there. You can't park close to work and parking has become very expensive, even when it's at a distance.
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Old 01-10-2015, 04:40 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,264,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
In Boulder, it can be bad for people who work there. You can't park close to work and parking has become very expensive, even when it's at a distance.

Maybe they could learn to walk to work or use transit. I hear Boulder is also one of the top cities for cycling.
Pedestrian zones exist primarily in urban areas where it is usually quite difficult if not impossible to drive to work anyways.
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Old 01-10-2015, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Rhode Island
6,837 posts, read 11,106,559 times
Reputation: 6833
Pedestrian only downtowns have been tried in the early 1960s and they failed. Look up the history.
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Old 01-10-2015, 04:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollytree View Post
Pedestrian only downtowns have been tried in the early 1960s and they failed. Look up the history.
I doubt it was even tried at a time when the car obsession, white flight from downtown areas
and suburbanization was at its peak.

But I wasn't around in the sixties so I wouldn't know for sure. But if there were so many failures then
you shouldn't have a problem providing some specific examples?
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Old 01-10-2015, 04:59 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,978 posts, read 102,527,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
Maybe they could learn to walk to work or use transit. I hear Boulder is also one of the top cities for cycling.
Pedestrian zones exist primarily in urban areas where it is usually quite difficult if not impossible to drive to work anyways.
Been hearing that for the entirety of the 33 years I've lived in Boulder County. No matter what they do to make it harder to drive, people still want to drive, and it's not particularly hard to drive over there. It can be hard to find a place to park inexpensively. Boulder has a lot of cyclists, but I don't think most of them actually work for a living.
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Old 01-10-2015, 05:10 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,264,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
Been hearing that for the entirety of the 33 years I've lived in Boulder County. No matter what they do to make it harder to drive, people still want to drive, and it's not particularly hard to drive over there. It can be hard to find a place to park inexpensively. Boulder has a lot of cyclists, but I don't think most of them actually work for a living.
Nice way to stereotype people. Boulder is a college town with very high student population.
That might be because they are students. Not to say that students don't work, because many obviously do.
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Old 01-10-2015, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,055 posts, read 16,063,174 times
Reputation: 12630
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The OP's proposal refers to just two blocks, not an entire downtown. The benefit would be more pleasant to walk in at the expense of automobile access.
To each his own. I personally find walking by a bunch of passed out bums, pan handlers, and boarded up buildings to not be pleasant, which is most likely what it would result in.
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Old 01-10-2015, 05:50 PM
 
409 posts, read 388,635 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
I doubt it was even tried at a time when the car obsession, white flight from downtown areas and suburbanization was at its peak.

But I wasn't around in the sixties so I wouldn't know for sure. But if there were so many failures then
you shouldn't have a problem providing some specific examples?
Burdick Street in Kalamazoo, Michigan is widely regarded as the first pedestrian mall in America. It opened in 1959, and over the next two decades 200 American cities followed suit, converted some blocks of their downtown to pedestrian only streets. As of 2005, only 20 of the original 200 pedestrian malls were still traffic-free. Burdick Street introduced cars back in 1998. Here is a picture of Burdick Street taken in 1960.

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Old 01-10-2015, 05:51 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,264,094 times
Reputation: 2924
Quote:
Originally Posted by ALackOfCreativity View Post
What works in super-dense, most-people-walk/subway-everywhere Manhattan isn't necessarily applicable to the rest of the country, or heck, even the rest of NYC.

Not saying it wouldn't work, just try to find an example from somewhere more normal.
The OP is talking about two blocks of a downtown not pedestrianizing the whole city.
Jesus Christ. I wish people would learn how to read.
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