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View Poll Results: should our cities be denser like Manila, Karachi and Mumbai?
Yes, this would be better than our sprawling us cities 25 37.31%
No, I don't want to live like a sardine 40 59.70%
I am not sure 2 2.99%
Voters: 67. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-16-2015, 02:14 AM
 
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What does snow have to do with density? That makes no sense. There are no really major cities in the North in the snowbelt anyways. Maybe Chicago and Boston are borderline, but they are nowhere near the lake effect type places.

And wouldn't higher density make snow removal easier, not harder? I'm not getting this, at all. Probably pretty efficient to remove snow somewhere like Manhattan, rather than dealing with the equivalent population spread out over thousands of square miles.

Many places in the South have more rainfall, or more humidity. Are these weather events somehow more conducive to high density?
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Old 02-16-2015, 05:24 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
What does snow have to do with density? That makes no sense. There are no really major cities in the North in the snowbelt anyways. Maybe Chicago and Boston are borderline, but they are nowhere near the lake effect type places.
I have several friends and co-workers in metro Boston that would strongly disagree with you right now. Heavy snowfall is not restricted to lake effect.

New England braces for fourth round of heavy snow
Boston, which has already endured 42 inches of snow this month and three major winter storms, plans to simply hunker down, with the area transit lines shutting down completely Sunday. The city has issued a parking ban starting 10 p.m. Saturday.
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Old 02-17-2015, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
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Originally Posted by AtkinsonDan View Post
I have several friends and co-workers in metro Boston that would strongly disagree with you right now. Heavy snowfall is not restricted to lake effect.

New England braces for fourth round of heavy snow
Boston, which has already endured 42 inches of snow this month and three major winter storms, plans to simply hunker down, with the area transit lines shutting down completely Sunday. The city has issued a parking ban starting 10 p.m. Saturday.
I suppose one could argue that, with global warming, severe weather events like this will continue to become more common. But, that means other severe weather events, such as hurricanes, tornados, and droughts, will also become more common, (and, although they aren't weather related, earthquakes should be taken into consideration) making large parts of the country undesirable for future development.
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Old 02-17-2015, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Yeah Boston doesn't get lake effect but it does get nor-easters. On the other hand, Chicago gets neither, like here, so typically that just means moderate snowfalls. I mean we'll get a snowfall of 10-15 inches every now and then but rarely more and I don't remember snow accumulation ever exceeding 15-20 inches or so.
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Old 02-21-2015, 10:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by AtkinsonDan View Post
I have several friends and co-workers in metro Boston that would strongly disagree with you right now. Heavy snowfall is not restricted to lake effect.

New England braces for fourth round of heavy snow
Boston, which has already endured 42 inches of snow this month and three major winter storms, plans to simply hunker down, with the area transit lines shutting down completely Sunday. The city has issued a parking ban starting 10 p.m. Saturday.
I'm sure you're aware that Boston is receiving record winter weather this year. Are you arguing that we should ignore weather averages and just take wild outliers?

There was a year not too long ago when NYC received no snow. Should I then claim that it doesn't snow in NYC?
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Old 02-22-2015, 08:45 AM
 
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Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
I'm sure you're aware that Boston is receiving record winter weather this year. Are you arguing that we should ignore weather averages and just take wild outliers?
It is called planning for the worst. Why would I choose to live in a northern dense city when this kind of weather is a possibility every year? FYI, the winter of 2013/2104 was also bad in New England. That is two very rough winters in a row.

I am fortunate that I moved out to 'the sticks' when I did (June 2012). My old neighbors in Lowell Massachusetts have shared their horror stories of the last two winters with me. Glad I got out.
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Old 02-22-2015, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
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Originally Posted by AtkinsonDan View Post
It is called planning for the worst. Why would I choose to live in a northern dense city when this kind of weather is a possibility every year? FYI, the winter of 2013/2104 was also bad in New England. That is two very rough winters in a row.

I am fortunate that I moved out to 'the sticks' when I did (June 2012). My old neighbors in Lowell Massachusetts have shared their horror stories of the last two winters with me. Glad I got out.
I tried to make this point before, but you ignored me. One has to balance planning for the worst with practicality. Otherwise, there would be no place to build anything practically, because the worst--everywhere--will cause disruption of everyday life.
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Old 02-22-2015, 11:19 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtkinsonDan View Post
It is called planning for the worst. Why would I choose to live in a northern dense city when this kind of weather is a possibility every year? FYI, the winter of 2013/2104 was also bad in New England. That is two very rough winters in a row.
Are low density areas really that much better at coping with snow? Plow response can be slower, and in less extreme events there are advantages in not having to drive everywhere after a snowstorm. I often avoid driving for a few days after a snowstorm; harder to do in a lower density area.
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Old 02-22-2015, 12:03 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Are low density areas really that much better at coping with snow? Plow response can be slower, and in less extreme events there are advantages in not having to drive everywhere after a snowstorm. I often avoid driving for a few days after a snowstorm; harder to do in a lower density area.
Yes. I've lived in two dense Massachusetts cities and one small town in my post-collegiate adult life. The small town is by far the easiest for dealing with winter weather. The small town is actually quicker to respond with plowing because there are less roads to plow and no issue of parked cars slowing down the plowing process. The small town is a simpler and quicker place to plow.
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Old 02-22-2015, 12:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
I tried to make this point before, but you ignored me. One has to balance planning for the worst with practicality. Otherwise, there would be no place to build anything practically, because the worst--everywhere--will cause disruption of everyday life.
The disruptions in the non-snow areas go away quicker than accumulating snow that does not melt for a month or two or three. In terms of climate, high density is more appropriate for the sunbelt and west coast. Those areas will have the least amount of disruption for dense environments.
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