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Old 01-14-2015, 11:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Two really cool images, talk about a great find. Out of both images, the one that surprised me the most is Dallas's light rail, I didn't realize they had that many lines and that extensive of a system already. And here I thought Austin was the liberal city of Texas, it seems like Dallas is ahead of the game in Texas.
Dallas is a much larger and more established city with a larger traditional downtown. Austin has only grown more recently.
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Old 01-14-2015, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by NickB1967 View Post
Dallas is a much larger and more established city with a larger traditional downtown. Austin has only grown more recently.
Does Austin have any plans for a light rail and/or a streetcar system in the near future?
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Old 01-14-2015, 12:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Does Austin have any plans for a light rail and/or a streetcar system in the near future?
They have CapMetro now. But the point is, Austin is a much newer city than Dallas, in most parts of it:

http://www.capmetro.org/metrorail/
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Old 01-14-2015, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by NickB1967 View Post
They have CapMetro now. But the point is, Austin is a much newer city than Dallas, in most parts of it:

Riding MetroRail - Capital Metro - Austin Public Transit
Okay, that is cool, though odd that it stops on the edge of the downtown. Usually starter lines run into or through a downtown.
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Old 01-14-2015, 01:52 PM
 
Location: The City
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https://rsnous.com/posts/2014-07-18-...nsit-maps.html
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Old 01-14-2015, 03:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Dallas's light rail, I didn't realize they had that many lines and that extensive of a system already.
Dallas' light rail is actually kind of sorry. For one thing, most of the lines are linear lines serving suburbs far from the city of Dallas itself, including a line to Plano which is a solid 20 miles from downtown and another line to the airport, another 20 miles from downtown.

Secondly there is no downtown loop since all the lines are essentially linear, so most of downtown and the CBD is still vastly underserved by rail. As is most of the city of Dallas itself. Nor does rail directly connect to the dense and desirable part of town to live in (uptown).

On the other hand, the rail line does a pretty decent job of serving the major tourist attractions and does connect to one of the airports (far away from downtown, the one nearby is oddly not directly connected to rail). In short it was mostly designed for suburban commuters and weekend visitors.
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Old 01-14-2015, 03:18 PM
 
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Originally Posted by TheOverdog View Post
Dallas' light rail is actually kind of sorry. For one thing, most of the lines are linear lines serving suburbs far from the city of Dallas itself, including a line to Plano which is a solid 20 miles from downtown and another line to the airport, another 20 miles from downtown.

Secondly there is no downtown loop since all the lines are essentially linear, so most of downtown and the CBD is still vastly underserved by rail. As is most of the city of Dallas itself. Nor does rail directly connect to the dense and desirable part of town to live in (uptown).

On the other hand, the rail line does a pretty decent job of serving the major tourist attractions and does connect to one of the airports (far away from downtown, the one nearby is oddly not directly connected to rail). In short it was mostly designed for suburban commuters and weekend visitors.
It was probably easier, and more politically popular, to send a rail line to DFW (the International Airport), rather than the smaller (and more built up around it) DAL Airport (Love Field). Nothing but Southwest and smaller regional airlines fly in and out of Love Field.
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Old 01-14-2015, 05:10 PM
 
Location: The City
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Here is a scale map of all rail lines (HR, LR, RR) in the Philly Metro

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi.../SEPTA_map.png
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Old 01-14-2015, 05:16 PM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ccdscott View Post
Philly Streetcar! Wow!

Great map, thanks.
The route 23 line, now a bus route was 25 miles and would have been longer than any of the other streetcar lines by a considerable amount - basically ran the from the stadiums today in S Philly up to Chestnut Hill in NW Philly

SEPTA Route 23 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There is discussion to bring this line back but never funded (most of the tracks and overhead wires remain actually)
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Old 01-15-2015, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Okay, that is cool, though odd that it stops on the edge of the downtown. Usually starter lines run into or through a downtown.
Austin is one of the only (if not the only) transit system using DMU technology which is sort of a hybrid of light/heavy rail. It looks a lot like light rail, but it's actually diesel powered heavy rail so it's a little more challenging to run it on city streets than LRT would be. I would imagine this is why it doesn't go further into downtown.

The Austin system also functions more like commuter rail as far as times it runs and frequency. I think they have expanded the hours it in operation further into evenings and weekends, but it's still a low ridership commuter type system. Between this and the way it doesn't go far into downtown, it's not a very usable system right now.
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