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Old 01-21-2015, 11:16 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Interesting story on our local news this morning. Since the gas prices have fallen, there has been a big increase in traffic as more public transit commuters get back into the car. I personally have stayed with the bus, but we are doing more weekend trips.

Drop in gas prices could mean more gridlock
A graph of vehicle miles traveled compared to the price of crude. By the end of the year, VMT could very likely surpass the 2007 high. The precipitous drop in gas prices is having a big impact on how much Americanís are driving.

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Old 01-21-2015, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
If you have a car, it is cheaper to drive it than to leave it in the garage and take transit. Local fare here is $2.25 one way. You can drive a lot of miles, especially at today's lower gas prices, for that. Before you go pulling up a link from the AAA or someone about how much per mile it costs to drive a car, remember they're including some costs that have nothing to do with getting from "Point A" to "Point B",e.g. depreciation (going to happen even with the car in the garage or on the street in front of your house), interest on your loan (ditto, and you may not even have a loan), etc.

If you read your link, you'd see that they're talking specifically about buying used cars, and really, I'd like to see their methodology. In any event, it doesn't say that car ownership is becoming an unmanageable challenge.
"If you have a car" is the key there. Regardless, the cost of buying even a used car is a large expense. That being said, America is setup very nicely for those who want to drive, so yes, it is cheaper to drive in most cases if you have a car.

And I'm not going to pull up any AAA links, but there is no question the younger generations are economically worse off (the whole shrinking of the middle class). That means all large purchases will become more difficult and increasingly "unmanageable".

I live at the urban extreme where it's more expensive to drive than it is to take transit, even if I owned a car. Finding a place to park, registration, high insurance, etc. My wife and I both have unlimited access to transit for $180/month.

Last edited by AJNEOA; 01-21-2015 at 11:37 AM..
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Old 01-21-2015, 11:36 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Interesting story on our local news this morning. Since the gas prices have fallen, there has been a big increase in traffic as more public transit commuters get back into the car. I personally have stayed with the bus, but we are doing more weekend trips.

Drop in gas prices could mean more gridlock

This is unfortunately true, many people think the cost of gas is the only variable expense.
But I can not think of one single cost of car ownership that is not affected by the amount you drive.
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Old 01-21-2015, 11:40 AM
 
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^Why is this "unfortunate"? People choosing the most convienent and economical form of transport is a bad thing to you?
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Old 01-21-2015, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Out in the Badlands
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The big problem with public transportation is....your fellow "public persons" are on it.
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Old 01-21-2015, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
"If you have a car" is the key there. Regardless, the cost of buying even a used car is a large expense. That being said, America is setup very nicely for those who want to drive, so yes, it is cheaper to drive in most cases if you have a car.

And I'm not going to pull up any AAA links, but there is no question the younger generations are economically worse off (the whole shrinking of the middle class). That means all large purchases will become more difficult and increasingly "unmanageable".

I live at the urban extreme where it's more expensive to drive than it is to take transit, even if I owned a car. Finding a place to park, registration, high insurance, etc. My wife and I both have unlimited access to transit for $180/month.
Well, heck, I was responding to this:

Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
No question they're generalizations. And each region has its own struggles for sure.



Or someone who needs to in order to save money (they may have a car). Someone who is uncomfortable driving in traffic or has a hassle finding parking. And no question owning a car is becoming more of an unmanageable challenge for many Americans:

New study says most can't afford used cars.
You will not, in most circumstances, save money by taking public transportation if you have a car. Now if you have to pay to park as well, perhaps.
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Old 01-21-2015, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
This is unfortunately true, many people think the cost of gas is the only variable expense.
But I can not think of one single cost of car ownership that is not affected by the amount you drive.
Depreciation? Maybe a little, but the majority of depreciation happens when you drive the car off the dealer's lot. If you hold on to your cars for a long time, as we tend to do, it's not such a big deal as if one buys a new car every few years.

Interest on your car loan? Not at all.

Insurance? There are several categories. There is some category of "pleasure, under X miles to school or work", but it's pretty low. People who use their cars for actual business, e.g. visiting nurses, sales people using their own cars, etc are in a different category altogether.
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Old 01-21-2015, 11:53 AM
 
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I live in Houston. if I could ride the bus or train or whatever I would. But it would take me 3 hours to get to work by bus and I would still have to drive my car to the bus station. And the bus station closest to me is in a really bad part of town and I wouldn't park a junked out Yugo there.

I worked at one job we had the option of parking at a remote parking lot and taking the bus in for free. That saved me about 1500 dollars a year instead of paying onsite parking.


Though my current job I have to have a car to drive to other site locations so the bus just isn't an option.
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Old 01-21-2015, 11:53 AM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,199,495 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by impala096 View Post
^Why is this "unfortunate"? People choosing the most convienent and economical form of transport is a bad thing to you?

More gridlock is unfortunate.
People making decisions on false economy is unfortunate.
More people burning fossil fuels is unfortunate.
More air pollution is unfortunate.
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Old 01-21-2015, 12:02 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
Depreciation? Maybe a little, but the majority of depreciation happens when you drive the car off the dealer's lot. If you hold on to your cars for a long time, as we tend to do, it's not such a big deal as if one buys a new car every few years.
Once your car is very old, whether you have a lot or little miles doesn't make a huge difference in its value, it may still have issues regardless of mileage, especially here where roads are salt-treated most of the winter. My car has 123,000 miles on it, any problems it has a result of age not mileage. But if you put a lot of miles a year, (say more than 15,000 miles or especially 20,000+ miles) the mileage will shorten its useful lifespan. You're more likely to run into problems on a ten year old car with over 200,000 miles than one with 100,000 miles. So if your commute is long (maybe 25+ miles each way) added wear and tear on a car will be significant. Of course, almost all 25+ mile commutes tolerable (time-wise) on public transit are either on rail or express bus, usually to a downtown.
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