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Old 01-21-2015, 12:04 PM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,194,850 times
Reputation: 3351

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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
Depreciation? Maybe a little, but the majority of depreciation happens when you drive the car off the dealer's lot. If you hold on to your cars for a long time, as we tend to do, it's not such a big deal as if one buys a new car every few years.

Interest on your car loan? Not at all.

Insurance? There are several categories. There is some category of "pleasure, under X miles to school or work", but it's pretty low. People who use their cars for actual business, e.g. visiting nurses, sales people using their own cars, etc are in a different category altogether.

-Cost of car: If you drive a lot you might replace your car every 3 to 7 years.
Drive very little and your car might last 15+ years.

-Insurance: I get a discount because I drive less than 10k miles per year.
I also pay less because my car is 11 years old.

-Registration: New cars pay much more for annual registration (Colorado).
The less you drive the longer your car lasts.

-Maintenance & tires: The less you drive the less you pay.

-Parking: The less you drive, the less you pay for parking.

-Time: It is a false economy to think that you save time driving.
On the train I can work, read or sleep, try that while driving.

-Traffic fines and lawyers: Someone who drive a lot is more likely to get parking tickets,
speeding tickets and DUIs, than someone who drives very little.

I can not think on one single automobile cost that is not effected by the amount you drive, can you?
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Old 01-21-2015, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,332,962 times
Reputation: 3562
Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
Well, heck, I was responding to this:



You will not, in most circumstances, save money by taking public transportation if you have a car. Now if you have to pay to park as well, perhaps.
Gotcha. There are still some scenarios, one of which you mentioned (paying to park). Another is something a friend of mine struggled with; a broken down car he couldn't afford to fix. All exceptions aside, I don't disagree it's usually cheaper to drive if you own a car.
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Old 01-21-2015, 12:10 PM
 
410 posts, read 389,294 times
Reputation: 495
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
More gridlock is unfortunate.
People making decisions on false economy is unfortunate.
More people burning fossil fuels is unfortunate.
More air pollution is unfortunate.
Gridlock is just a pesky side-effect of more drivers on the road. If it gets too bad, drivers may curtail the amount of trips they take or move back to mass transit (if it becomes more convenient). Again, it's all about choice! How is that "unfortunate"?

It is unfortunate that many discredit the resiliency of planet Earth.
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Old 01-21-2015, 12:14 PM
 
Location: EPWV
11,052 posts, read 6,201,402 times
Reputation: 12226
I don't want a train to hit a deer but would rather that than my car.
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Old 01-21-2015, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,659,080 times
Reputation: 4508
Quote:
Originally Posted by impala096 View Post
Gridlock is just a pesky side-effect of more drivers on the road. If it gets too bad, drivers may curtail the amount of trips they take or move back to mass transit (if it becomes more convenient). Again, it's all about choice! How is that "unfortunate"?

It is unfortunate that many discredit the resiliency of planet Earth.
To quote George Carlin: "The planet is fine. The people are..."
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Old 01-21-2015, 12:25 PM
 
410 posts, read 389,294 times
Reputation: 495
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
To quote George Carlin: "The planet is fine. The people are..."

George Carlin - People Are ****ing Boring - YouTube
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Old 01-21-2015, 12:47 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,010 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33064
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
-Cost of car: If you drive a lot you might replace your car every 3 to 7 years.
Drive very little and your car might last 15+ years.

-Insurance: I get a discount because I drive less than 10k miles per year.
I also pay less because my car is 11 years old.

-Registration: New cars pay much more for annual registration (Colorado).
The less you drive the longer your car lasts.

-Maintenance & tires: The less you drive the less you pay.

-Parking: The less you drive, the less you pay for parking.

-Time: It is a false economy to think that you save time driving.
On the train I can work, read or sleep, try that while driving.

-Traffic fines and lawyers: Someone who drive a lot is more likely to get parking tickets,
speeding tickets and DUIs, than someone who drives very little.

I can not think on one single automobile cost that is not effected by the amount you drive, can you?
Yes, and I already posted it. You. will. pay. no. less. on a car loan if your car sits in its garage. Now, for the most part, we have paid cash for our cars, but DH was offered a no-interest loan the last time, so he took it. He did do his "do diligence" first, it really is no interest.

I'm not talking about new cars vs old, either. I'm talking about the cost of getting from "Point A" to "Point B". I should point out that car registration is different in every state. Many employers offer free parking. I've gotten few tickets, one in Denver, (Do you live there today? Yesterday you were living in Boulder), for parking somewhere near 6th Ave. in a residents only area. It wasn't well marked. I'm not dumb enough to get a DUI, and I rarely speed.
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Old 01-21-2015, 01:28 PM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,194,850 times
Reputation: 3351
Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
Yes, and I already posted it. You. will. pay. no. less. on a car loan if your car sits in its garage. Now, for the most part, we have paid cash for our cars, but DH was offered a no-interest loan the last time, so he took it. He did do his "do diligence" first, it really is no interest.

I'm not talking about new cars vs old, either. I'm talking about the cost of getting from "Point A" to "Point B". I should point out that car registration is different in every state. Many employers offer free parking. I've gotten few tickets, one in Denver, (Do you live there today? Yesterday you were living in Boulder), for parking somewhere near 6th Ave. in a residents only area. It wasn't well marked. I'm not dumb enough to get a DUI, and I rarely speed.

We are discussing two different things. I'm discussing the total cost of auto ownership as it pertains to the decision to commute by private car or public transit. You seem to be discussing the cost of a single trip from point a to point b.

My initial comment was in response to the fact more people are driving because gas is cheaper and I pointed out that the cost of gas is only one of many costs of auto ownership and operation.

But I stand by my comment that I can not think of a single cost that is not lower if you drive less.
Again, I'm looking at the total cost of auto ownership, not the cost of one single trip.

You pay less on a car loan if you drive less, because you need to replace your car less often therefore pay less for the cost of ownership (including interest on loan, if any).

I realize car registration is different in every state, which is why I added (Colorado).
But most states do charge based on age or value of car.

I'm not really interested in your personal driving record, but statistically, the more you drive, the more likely you are to get a ticket (speeding, parking or DUI).
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Old 01-21-2015, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,528,523 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by wintersbone View Post
I live in Houston. if I could ride the bus or train or whatever I would. But it would take me 3 hours to get to work by bus and I would still have to drive my car to the bus station. And the bus station closest to me is in a really bad part of town and I wouldn't park a junked out Yugo there.

I worked at one job we had the option of parking at a remote parking lot and taking the bus in for free. That saved me about 1500 dollars a year instead of paying onsite parking.


Though my current job I have to have a car to drive to other site locations so the bus just isn't an option.
I don't recall the Houston metro being known for its transit system. Always figured it to be a metro where the car come first and if you don't own a car, you are screwed.
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Old 01-21-2015, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,528,523 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by impala096 View Post
Gridlock is just a pesky side-effect of more drivers on the road. If it gets too bad, drivers may curtail the amount of trips they take or move back to mass transit (if it becomes more convenient). Again, it's all about choice! How is that "unfortunate"?

It is unfortunate that many discredit the resiliency of planet Earth.
If an area had neglected transit for so long to the point that it is nonexistent, then how would it be fixed and made more convenient? As it is now we have places where the commute might be an hour or more in gridlock traffic, yet the transit system is so neglected that it would take 3 hours and a few changes and a long walk at each end. Therefore people continue to say driving is more convenient even though it wouldn't be if the transit system was up to par.
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