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Old 01-22-2015, 07:14 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vision33r View Post
Many Americans are just too lazy to take mass transit or simply walk or jog to work. Obesity rates supports this.

Compare urban cities vs suburbs and you find most fat people live in the suburbs and prefers drive-thrus.

I enjoy my rush hour commutes because I get to slowly wake myself up vs being in a panic mode driving bumper to bumper against bad drivers.

Rush hour driving is bad for your health and safety. Auto accidents soon will outpace some health diseases.
Yeah, right. The highest rates of obesity are in the inner cities, where fewer people have cars and more take transit. Generally, the suburbs have healthier residents than the cities. I have posted on this many times before; do a search for my posts.
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Old 01-22-2015, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,329,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
Yeah, right. The highest rates of obesity are in the inner cities, where fewer people have cars and more take transit. Generally, the suburbs have healthier residents than the cities. I have posted on this many times before; do a search for my posts.
And you ignore poverty every time you post it.
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Old 01-22-2015, 07:50 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
The only thing that will make people demand options is to let the cost of driving rise. Paying to park, gas prices at international rates, more tolls on roads for maintenance, etc.
For the area I had in mind (Suffolk County, Long Island). The main result would be switch to more fuel efficient or cheaper cars, except for those on a direct bus line. Its too spread out that transit would always lose badly

Quote:
Even if public transport is low, it's more likely to be because "walking" is so high, not because so many people are driving. New Zealand and Australia are two countries that stand with America in this regard. And as drive carephilly has mentioned, this is a very limited view because it's only looking at trips to work and back.
Walking in France outside Paris was another 8%. Together with bicycles, the drive to work was 80.4%. Despite higher driving costs than the US and denser residential neighborhoods, most people drove to work. Transit tends to get less of a share of non-work trips everywhere: they're divided more between walking and driving.

NatGeo surveys countries' transit use: guess who comes in last | Kaid Benfield's Blog | Switchboard, from NRDC
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Old 01-22-2015, 07:53 AM
 
409 posts, read 388,894 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Yeah, buses run empty because we've made driving so practical. Who's going to take an infrequent bus when gas prices are pushed so low, parking is free in so many places and employment centers are so scattered? Not many. And running more buses isn't going to do a thing but encourage more complaining that transit is a waste of money. The only thing that will make people demand options is to let the cost of driving rise. Paying to park, gas prices at international rates, more tolls on roads for maintenance, etc.
Interesting link looking at gas prices by country. From $9.26/gallon in Norway down to $0.04/gallon in Venezuela (as of Q4 2014).

Bloomberg Gas Price Ranking
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Old 01-22-2015, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,329,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by impala096 View Post
Interesting link looking at gas prices by country. From $9.26/gallon in Norway down to $0.04/gallon in Venezuela (as of Q4 2014).

Bloomberg Gas Price Ranking
Thanks for the link, very nice tool. They don't seem to have a mean/average, but here's what I came up with:

Half-way between the high/low price: $4.61
Half-way through the rankings: $5.93
Price in the USA: $2.93
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Old 01-22-2015, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
7,542 posts, read 8,420,741 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Yeah, buses run empty because we've made driving so practical. Who's going to take an infrequent bus when gas prices are pushed so low, parking is free in so many places and employment centers are so scattered? Not many. And running more buses isn't going to do a thing but encourage more complaining that transit is a waste of money. The only thing that will make people demand options is to let the cost of driving rise.


America is spread out, with a large middle class.

Inasmuch as places of employment. schools, malls and where people's homes are situated are already set, public transit planners have to take that into consideration.

Gasoline prices go to the level that people can afford them, I don't think the government wants to force the people down, just so that public transit becomes more "viable".

Forcing people by economic manuevering of gas and parking fees to walk a mile to the main road and wait for an hour for a slow bus to get to work or do shopping isn't going to be a help to the Middle Class.
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Old 01-22-2015, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,329,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I_Like_Spam View Post
America is spread out, with a large middle class.

Inasmuch as places of employment. schools, malls and where people's homes are situated are already set, public transit planners have to take that into consideration.

Gasoline prices go to the level that people can afford them, I don't think the government wants to force the people down, just so that public transit becomes more "viable".

Forcing people by economic manuevering of gas and parking fees to walk a mile to the main road and wait for an hour for a slow bus to get to work or do shopping isn't going to be a help to the Middle Class.
Don't read too far into my post. I'm not suggesting that we stop subsidizing gas prices or stop paving roads or anything like that. I'm simply saying that there is a reason transit usage is so low in the US. It's not that it can't work in more places, but it's difficult to improve when the climate is torqued toward the private automobile. And in most places in the US, transit will likely never work. My only hope is that truly dense/urban corridors continue to improve transit (e.g. where I live in Philly).
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Old 01-22-2015, 09:14 AM
 
Location: 59N
5,213 posts, read 5,868,580 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by impala096 View Post
Interesting link looking at gas prices by country. From $9.26/gallon in Norway down to $0.04/gallon in Venezuela (as of Q4 2014).

Bloomberg Gas Price Ranking
What share of average day's wages needed to buy a gallon of gasoline:

Brazil: 18%
Mexico: 13%
Italy: 8.3%
Russia: 8.3%
UK: 6.1%
Japan: 5.6%
Norway: 3.4%
Canada: 3.3%
UAE: 1.5%
Saudia Arabia: <1%

Norway:
Rank 1: Gas Price
Rank 52: Unaffordability
Rank 53: Income Spent
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Old 01-22-2015, 09:33 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
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US is 2.3% from that chart

Though, perhaps what matters is cost of gas vs transit. If gas in Norway is inexpensive relative to income but transit is still cheaper, more will switch to transit. Though I suspect Norwegian transit fares are expensive, too.

Big Brazilian and Mexican cities have rather high driving rate for their densities and considering their incomes. High income inequality probably means the average driver in a big city there isn't paying much more in gas as a % of their income compared to say the UK.
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Old 01-22-2015, 09:42 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,772 posts, read 54,424,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I_Like_Spam View Post
America is spread out, with a large middle class.

Inasmuch as places of employment. schools, malls and where people's homes are situated are already set, public transit planners have to take that into consideration.

Gasoline prices go to the level that people can afford them, I don't think the government wants to force the people down, just so that public transit becomes more "viable".

Forcing people by economic manuevering of gas and parking fees to walk a mile to the main road and wait for an hour for a slow bus to get to work or do shopping isn't going to be a help to the Middle Class.
I walk a mile from the bus stop to the office every day (and back) and it's about 16 minutes. The bus runs every 10 minutes so it's normally only a 5 minute wait or less. The bus takes advantage of it's own lanes on the freeway and therefore goes far faster than I could driving. While I like to drive and have 3 cars, the bus is relaxing, faster, and I lost 10 lbs. thanks to the walking. I use it only for the commute, however, and have no choice since they do not run except at commute times on weekdays to our suburban city.
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