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Old 01-17-2015, 10:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
I have lived across the U.S. and it seems that public transportation is more favored in certain areas (Boston, SF, DC) and looked down upon as something that only "the poor" or students use (Minneapolis, Baltimore).
Typical for bus-only systems. They are designed to serve only the Bottom of the Barrel, and use slow routes and often beat up buses. Does mass transit work for everyone? Well, obviously not for someone living in an acre lot subdivision and commuting 50 km to an oil refinery, third trick. But for someone in a medium density suburb the same distance to a central city office with fast express trains and enough parking at the station (an amenity not always provided), definitely. Another observation: the work at home percentage is 4%. In 1980 it was 2.3. Those who work mostly from home but commute occasionally around 8.

Last edited by pvande55; 01-17-2015 at 10:29 AM.. Reason: Clarification
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Old 01-17-2015, 10:28 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,161,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Typical for bus-only systems. They are designed to serve only the Bottom of the Barrel, and use slow routes and often beat up buses. Does mass transit work for everyone? Well, obviously not for someone living in an acre lot subdivision and commuting 50 km to an oil refinery, third trick. But for someone in a medium density suburb the same distance to a central city office with fast express trains and enough parking at the station (an amenity not always provided), definitely. Another observation: the work at home percentage is 8%. In 1980 it was 2.3.
I wonder what the top will be for work at home

I technically have an office about 15 miles away - Live in core and office is in the burbs. I go to the office twice a month work from home 2-3 days a week and travel to clients the remainder. Not sure how that categorizes me but I wfh more often than anything else - not the case even 5 years ago
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Old 01-17-2015, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lookb4youcross View Post
No, it reflects that people don't want to use public transportation! I use to take public transportation, it was awful. I disliked having to sit by unknown people, I disliked how long it takes to get from point A to point B. People drive vehicles because it is simply more practical.
Hardly, people can't use public transportation if it is nonexistent in most places. Therefore it isn't even an option. I don't feel uncomfortable sitting next to someone I don't know. And how long it takes is often times a poor reflection of how bad our existing transit systems have gotten.
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Old 01-17-2015, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lookb4youcross View Post
Seriously, how is public transit practical? Like another poster mentioned, you have to adhere to certain times that it is operating. You can get in and drive a vehicle at any time of the day or night. I know there are idealistic zealous advocates out there that want people out of their personal vehicles real bad for some reason, unfortunately their utopia is unrealistic ( not compatible with reality )
Depends, if the system is actually a good system, time planning shouldn't be an issue. For me, I live where transit is good. I have 4 buses on a 15 minute schedule, plus one express that runs during rush hour. I can leave my house when ever and know that within 15 minutes I will be catching one of several buses.
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Old 01-17-2015, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Hardly, people can't use public transportation if it is nonexistent in most places. Therefore it isn't even an option. I don't feel uncomfortable sitting next to someone I don't know. And how long it takes is often times a poor reflection of how bad our existing transit systems have gotten.
Do you have any suggestions on how to make public transport quicker and for it to serve the majority of the people? Buses would be the key, laying track from every subdivision in the land to every office park, school and mall, is just impractical.
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Old 01-17-2015, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lookb4youcross View Post
Exactly. Some forget most of us don't live in a major metro area.
No one is arguing that, unless you are. Obviously a rural area isn't going to really have a transit system.
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Old 01-17-2015, 11:20 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,967,271 times
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Originally Posted by I_Like_Spam View Post
Do you have any suggestions on how to make public transport quicker and for it to serve the majority of the people? Buses would be the key, laying track from every subdivision in the land to every office park, school and mall, is just impractical.
I doubt that is practical. Improving it some spots could help where it would be practical for users is usually better. Taking steps to improve bus speed: signal priority, bus lanes, sometimes less stops. Better network design, for example, meandering bus routes are bad speed-wise, parallel bus routes damage frequency. Often something close to a grid is best. Jarrett Walker's Human Transit blog discusses this. Here's an example:

Human Transit: houston: transit, reimagined

Some denser cities have rail lines that aren't used that much that could be reactived without much effort. Boston's Fairmount Line is a good example.
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Old 01-17-2015, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by Mandalorian View Post
To access different amenities and stores.

Sure, I stick to my suburb for the most part, but that's about 65% of the time.
Where I live it has all the amenities I would need for daily living. The furthest we drive is out to Costco which is still on our side of the metro, and Ikea which is all the way on the north end because we only have one. I rarely need to go to anywhere on the west end of the metro or even anywhere on much of the east end. Heck, it has been years since I have been to parts of North Portland.

The percentage of the metro I go to regularly is actually very small, and this is with having access to a car.
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Old 01-17-2015, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,523,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I_Like_Spam View Post
Do you have any suggestions on how to make public transport quicker and for it to serve the majority of the people? Buses would be the key, laying track from every subdivision in the land to every office park, school and mall, is just impractical.
Quicker for people living further out would need a combination of local and express buses with easy transfer stations for people to go from a local to express bus. Also, light rail is a good option for providing regional transit with running busses to and from those stations to the surrounding areas.

Obviously this is just a short answer, a better answer would require research on where people are commuting to and from and how to improve transit along those routes.
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Old 01-17-2015, 11:33 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Transit is almost always inferior, on an individual level, to driving when it comes to work commutes. Transit's two big negatives are it operates on a schedule (whereas you can get in a car whenever you want) and it is almost always slower than a car (it can be quicker if you're dealing with transit separated from the road, but in much of the country, when you talk about transit, you mean surface road bus transit, which is slow as molasses).

Public transit can outshine driving for work trips for basically two reasons, both of them relating to parking. One, if parking is rare near your place of work, and you will have to spend a good deal of your time circling around looking for parking. Second, and related, if all parking spaces near your place of work not only cost money, but cost significantly more than a round-trip transit ticket.
The other benefit is cost. While driving isn't much more expensive than transit, when you already own a car, transit is much cheaper than not owning a car at all. If the inconvenience of transit over driving isn't that big, some might not get a car at all and rely on transit. Say a family having one car instead of two. The rural poor and sometimes suburban poor have cars, while the urban poor don't. In cities where the advantage of driving is rather low, some non-poor won't drive either. A 20-something out of college in say Boston getting an decent but not great salary might forgo a car, one in many other American cities probably wouldn't.
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