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Old 01-21-2015, 08:32 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Most people aren't going to flat out reject a job on its location alone. But people look for jobs that are convenient to them if they have any choice. If you live in some of the more urban sections of Boston, many of the jobs in suburban office park are a relative pain to get to* and some might not have a car. If you can help it, you'd want to work elsewhere. The New York City metro because of its size and congestion the commute pain is even worse, and far more don't have a car. Living in say, Brooklyn and commuting to a job in suburban Conneticut or New Jersey is painful. If all your friends are in the city, a lot of the stuff you do is in the city, and you like it there you'd only move if you really have to. The environment around a job is a perk depending on tastes.


*Yes, suburbanite commute to downtown jobs, too but it's not the same. There's commuter rail to downtown jobs, few suburban jobs are accesible by rail — which is why I've criticized park and ride rail previously.
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Old 01-21-2015, 08:58 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,606,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Most people aren't going to flat out reject a job on its location alone. But people look for jobs that are convenient to them if they have any choice. If you live in some of the more urban sections of Boston, many of the jobs in suburban office park are a relative pain to get to* and some might not have a car. If you can help it, you'd want to work elsewhere. The New York City metro because of its size and congestion the commute pain is even worse, and far more don't have a car. Living in say, Brooklyn and commuting to a job in suburban Conneticut or New Jersey is painful. If all your friends are in the city, a lot of the stuff you do is in the city, and you like it there you'd only move if you really have to. The environment around a job is a perk depending on tastes.


*Yes, suburbanite commute to downtown jobs, too but it's not the same. There's commuter rail to downtown jobs, few suburban jobs are accesible by rail which is why I've criticized park and ride rail previously.
And most people here don't willingly cross downtown to take a job in the southern suburbs (say, the Denver Tech Center) if they live up north, and vice versa; or east-west either. But sometimes you do what you have to do. A young college grad could buy a car; someone's always willing to give you a loan, including sometimes your parents.

I don't see tying this to park and rides.
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Old 01-21-2015, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Outside of a few top tier, high skill, hard to fill positions and marquee companies, which are going to be located in major urban areas anyway, the vast majority of Millenial workers do not have the leverage to influence whether the companies locate in the urban core or the suburbs. You go where the job is.
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Old 01-21-2015, 09:14 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
Outside of a few top tier, high skill, hard to fill positions and marquee companies, which are going to be located in major urban areas anyway, the vast majority of Millenial workers do not have the leverage to influence whether the companies locate in the urban core or the suburbs. You go where the job is.
You said it better than I tried to!
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Old 01-21-2015, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Originally Posted by Attrill View Post
I think if you're talking about young recruits, then being close to an urban center with public transit and amenities is a plus. I also think it isn't a definite negative for older workers, or any workers living in the suburbs.

I certainly don't think that anyone should be saying things like "all the Millennials want to live in cities", but at the same time urban centers no longer carry the stigma they did from the late 60's until the late 80's. During that time, some people who wanted to live in a city center were afraid of the crime and the return on any property they might buy, and moved to the suburbs. I think those stigmas are gone, and most people today regard city centers as being vibrant and livable. The automobile has also lost a lot of it's attraction as a modern toy or status symbol for most people, and even intra-suburban commutes have become a dreary slog in many areas. Anyone who prefers to live in a dense urban area will feel comfortable doing it in a way that they wouldn't have 40, 30, or 20 years ago.

These changes have led to a larger percentage of people feeling comfortable moving into an central city area, and for younger people (who are more removed from the historical negative stigma of cities, and the attraction of cars) the attraction is greater. A larger percentage of them will see urban areas as being a desirable place to live than any other generation. They also have the freedom to take advantage of many of the things cities offer - restaurants, bars, music, sports leagues, classes, museums, etc...

What companies and Midwestern cities? I haven't been seeing that going on in any of the cities I'm familiar with.
I'm probably in the minority on this as a Millenial, but I think many urban centers still carry a stigma, right or wrong. When I look on the Indy Star or any of the local news stations' Facebook pages, it seems like 90% of the crime is in the city limits of Indianapolis. It's routine to see "On the east side..." "Shooting on near north side.." "Robbery reported at <insert inner city street block>"

That's not to say there is no crime in the suburbs or that all of the city is bad. Much of the city is fine, but the bad parts are very bad. Crime can often be a block by block thing, but frankly, I don't want to live a half mile from where people are getting shot routinely. My job is on the literal last couple hundred yards of the city limits, but I have no desire to move into the city. Even if I had a job downtown or in the inner core, I wouldn't want to live there.
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Old 01-21-2015, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
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IMO, for an increasing number of people, if they get 2 job offers, (which seems very likely for top talent) one in a suburban office park and another in a walkable city center, they are more likely to choose the job in the city center. Over time, if this trend continues, I think it will have an effect on where corporations locate.
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Old 01-21-2015, 10:22 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
IMO, for an increasing number of people, if they get 2 job offers, (which seems very likely for top talent) one in a suburban office park and another in a walkable city center, they are more likely to choose the job in the city center. Over time, if this trend continues, I think it will have an effect on where corporations locate.
IMO, they're more likely to choose the job that pays more, or is more in line with what they want to do, etc. My spouse has a PhD in physics and he has never received more than one offer at a time in 35 years.
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Old 01-21-2015, 11:06 AM
 
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Well, if the pay you offer is enough to be attractive even after taking out added housing and transport costs, I think so. The question is if it is worth it to you to be willing to pay that much.
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Old 01-21-2015, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Chicago - Logan Square
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One other thing to note is that companies aren't just moving to central city areas to attract workers, they're also doing it because business models changed. The growth of suburban corporate campuses happened because companies were trying to bring all the services they used in house. For example, they were creating legal departments instead of paying law firms. That trend has completely reversed, and it makes sense for companies to now be located close to the firms and agencies that they're contracting out to, and that usually happens to be downtown.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
I'm probably in the minority on this as a Millenial, but I think many urban centers still carry a stigma, right or wrong. When I look on the Indy Star or any of the local news stations' Facebook pages, it seems like 90% of the crime is in the city limits of Indianapolis. It's routine to see "On the east side..." "Shooting on near north side.." "Robbery reported at <insert inner city street block>"
While I'm not sure if you're in a minority, there sure are a hell of a lot of people who don't share your views.

I've been visiting downtown Indy regularly for 20 years. The growth there is incredible - The NCAA Headquarters, Circle Center, the build out of the Wholesale District, and much much more. Indianapolis is a poster child for a growing downtown, and it shows no sign of slowing down. I think the Indy Star is moving downtown soon, so the reporters writing the stories that scare you don't seem to share your fears.
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Old 01-21-2015, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,332,962 times
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Originally Posted by rwiksell View Post
I'm looking for resources to support (or refute) the hypothesis that corporations looking to recruit top young talent must seriously consider locating their offices in walkable urban neighborhoods. Does anyone have any data, or at least anecdotal evidence, along these lines?

I see a lot of companies (especially in the midwest) re-locating to office parks in the 'burbs, and still expecting to attract lots of bright millenial college grads. However, my theory is that this type of location is a major turnoff to that generation.

What do you think?
I'm not sure if you'll find what you want here, but I found this:

New Report Shows Mounting Evidence of Millennials

There is likely something that supports (and maybe conflicts with) your hypothesis.

Anecdote - I'm a late Gen Xer, and I just declined two jobs because they were out in the burbs. I ended up taking a job in downtown, and it took me almost two extra weeks, but that was a central part of my criteria. If I can help it, I will never work for a company in a suburban car-centric office park again in my life.
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