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Old 01-21-2015, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,661,531 times
Reputation: 4508

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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
IMO, they're more likely to choose the job that pays more, or is more in line with what they want to do, etc. My spouse has a PhD in physics and he has never received more than one offer at a time in 35 years.
I'm not a millennial, and I know it's a different economy now, but when I was entering the workforce, back in 2000, I nearly had two job offers. I interviewed with a coupe different companies within days of each other. One company offered me a job after the first interview. But just a couple days later, I got a call from a second company asking if I could come in for a second interview. (And, I would definitely not consider myself "top talent")

I'm not sure that pay is as big of a consideration as it once was, within reason. If someone is offered $50k/year for the suburban job, but $45k/year for the job in the city center, it may be worth it--for some people--to take the lower paying job for the higher quality of life. But, that's obviously going to be less true as the difference in pay increases.

I definitely agree with you about job description, though. I think having an ideal job in a less-than-ideal location is seen by most as better than a less-than-ideal job in an ideal location.
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Old 01-21-2015, 11:59 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
I'm not sure if you'll find what you want here, but I found this:

New Report Shows Mounting Evidence of Millennials

There is likely something that supports (and maybe conflicts with) your hypothesis.

Anecdote - I'm a late Gen Xer, and I just declined two jobs because they were out in the burbs. I ended up taking a job in downtown, and it took me almost two extra weeks, but that was a central part of my criteria. If I can help it, I will never work for a company in a suburban car-centric office park again in my life.
God in heaven, PIRG! I didn't read any further. They are certainly an agenda group if there ever was one.
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Old 01-21-2015, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,335,456 times
Reputation: 3562
Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
God in heaven, PIRG! I didn't read any further. They are certainly an agenda group if there ever was one.
Right, so there are no valid points because you disapprove of PIRG.

EDIT: I see you have re-branded yourself katiana...I knew there was something familiar with these posts.
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Old 01-21-2015, 12:13 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,998,698 times
Reputation: 14810
Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
IMO, they're more likely to choose the job that pays more, or is more in line with what they want to do, etc. My spouse has a PhD in physics and he has never received more than one offer at a time in 35 years.
A friend turned down a job offer that was quite a bit higher paying (maybe a least 30% more that his existing job) that was in the suburbs (suburban Conneticut about 40 miles northeast, he was living in Brooklyn). It involved a commute maybe three times longer and getting a car or moving. He would rather live close by friends.
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Old 01-21-2015, 12:38 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Right, so there are no valid points because you disapprove of PIRG.

EDIT: I see you have re-branded yourself katiana...I knew there was something familiar with these posts.
I am not trying to pull the wool over anyone's eyes. "FallsAngel" used to be my status; I just changed it to my name. I like angels. It's a play on words, from my hometown.

PIRG is an advocacy group. Heck, or should I say hell since I'm a fallen angel, I've been dinged for posting stuff from such groups here.
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Old 01-21-2015, 12:41 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
A friend turned down a job offer that was quite a bit higher paying (maybe a least 30% more that his existing job) that was in the suburbs (suburban Conneticut about 40 miles northeast, he was living in Brooklyn). It involved a commute maybe three times longer and getting a car or moving. He would rather live close by friends.
Well, IMO, he's crazy. The friends will move away; that's almost a guarantee. IME, when people say they turned down a job for a reason like that, there's usually something else as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
I'm not a millennial, and I know it's a different economy now, but when I was entering the workforce, back in 2000, I nearly had two job offers. I interviewed with a coupe different companies within days of each other. One company offered me a job after the first interview. But just a couple days later, I got a call from a second company asking if I could come in for a second interview. (And, I would definitely not consider myself "top talent")

I'm not sure that pay is as big of a consideration as it once was, within reason. If someone is offered $50k/year for the suburban job, but $45k/year for the job in the city center, it may be worth it--for some people--to take the lower paying job for the higher quality of life. But, that's obviously going to be less true as the difference in pay increases.

I definitely agree with you about job description, though. I think having an ideal job in a less-than-ideal location is seen by most as better than a less-than-ideal job in an ideal location.
After you posted that, I recalled when I was offered two jobs on the same day, after looking for some time. One was a job as a "jail-house nurse" at the Boulder County jail, the other was as a visiting nurse for a health department a county away. Guess which one I took? But, it hasn't happened since.
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Old 01-21-2015, 12:49 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,998,698 times
Reputation: 14810
Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
Well, IMO, he's crazy. The friends will move away; that's almost a guarantee. IME, when people say they turned down a job for a reason like that, there's usually something else as well.
He already had a decent paying job. Eventually they'll move away, but what would point of socially isolating yourself now? I think it was a bit odd he was even interviewing there.
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Old 01-21-2015, 01:00 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
He already had a decent paying job. Eventually they'll move away, but what would point of socially isolating yourself now? I think it was a bit odd he was even interviewing there.
You have a point there. But I have known plenty of men who interviewed for jobs in places their partners refused to move to. In fact, I know some of these guys pretty well!
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Old 01-21-2015, 04:03 PM
 
2,825 posts, read 3,352,590 times
Reputation: 3030
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
I'm not a millennial, and I know it's a different economy now, but when I was entering the workforce, back in 2000, I nearly had two job offers. I interviewed with a coupe different companies within days of each other. One company offered me a job after the first interview. But just a couple days later, I got a call from a second company asking if I could come in for a second interview. (And, I would definitely not consider myself "top talent")

I'm not sure that pay is as big of a consideration as it once was, within reason. If someone is offered $50k/year for the suburban job, but $45k/year for the job in the city center, it may be worth it--for some people--to take the lower paying job for the higher quality of life. But, that's obviously going to be less true as the difference in pay increases.

I definitely agree with you about job description, though. I think having an ideal job in a less-than-ideal location is seen by most as better than a less-than-ideal job in an ideal location.

That's hilarious. I would consider a job in the city center to reflect a lower quality of life. Not only are you getting paid less - it also costs more to commute there
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Old 01-21-2015, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Chicago - Logan Square
3,396 posts, read 6,184,998 times
Reputation: 3717
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
A friend turned down a job offer that was quite a bit higher paying (maybe a least 30% more that his existing job) that was in the suburbs (suburban Conneticut about 40 miles northeast, he was living in Brooklyn). It involved a commute maybe three times longer and getting a car or moving. He would rather live close by friends.
I don't think that's unusual at all. I regularly get calls from recruiters and the jobs are invariably out in the suburbs, I don't even bother to ask how much more they're paying - I'm not interested. I've also seen a number of people quit account jobs when their job requirements changed and required them to drive out to client sites a few times a week.
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