U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-22-2015, 09:25 PM
 
Location: San Francisco/East Bay and Los Angeles, formerly DC and Boston
2,140 posts, read 3,430,980 times
Reputation: 1819

Advertisements

I love cities, but have never liked public transit or riding in taxicabs. I live less than 5 mins walk from a DC Metro stop and rarely use it. But in the last month, I've taken my car out maybe 10 times, and have put less than 200 miles on it, because I travel frequently, but also because I'm increasingly taking Uber to work.

Not saying I'm a fan of the company, but I think Uber can do great things for cities, without the massive public investment transit requires. If I wanted to, I could sell my car, possibly even my wife's, and this wasn't even a consideration before Uber. We also walk a ton, but if we had less money we could easily live car free if we wanted to save $.

Uber clearly is increasing the viability of car free urban living. But by how much? Do you think it will impact density, demographics, or other features of U.S. cities?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-22-2015, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
7,542 posts, read 8,420,741 times
Reputation: 3483
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheseGoTo11 View Post

Uber clearly is increasing the viability of car free urban living. But by how much? Do you think it will impact density, demographics, or other features of U.S. cities?
Its a relatively new service, I don't know how viable it will be in the long run.

I can't see how the drivers are really making anything, considering the wear and tear on their cars and the fact that Uber doesn't sign on people with "beaters" to tote people around where the costs would be less to the driver.

Let me ask you, do you have the same Uber driver pick you up each day, and can you call them directly for the pickup outside of the app?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2015, 05:49 AM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,329,932 times
Reputation: 3562
Uber is a more technologically advanced and luxurious cab ride IME. I've taken them in the Philly area, and while the experience was nicer than taking a standard cab, it is EXPENSIVE. I don't really consider cabs public or mass transit, since it's renting a private car ride for a single party. I also don't see it changing anything in terms of urban design because of a few things:

1. The masses cannot afford to take Uber (or a cab) most of the time. It's an occasional ride for most.

2. Because of this, Uber is not impacting transportation habits in any sizable numbers. It's giving cab companies competition (which they don't like), leaving walking, transit and driving right where they were.

3. Uber is going to struggle to operate in several states and cities. It's basically running an illegal service and it has been banned in several countries, states and cities:

Uber (company) - Regulatory Issues

Last edited by AJNEOA; 01-23-2015 at 06:19 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2015, 01:41 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,004,486 times
Reputation: 1348
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Uber is a more technologically advanced and luxurious cab ride IME. I've taken them in the Philly area, and while the experience was nicer than taking a standard cab, it is EXPENSIVE. I don't really consider cabs public or mass transit, since it's renting a private car ride for a single party. I also don't see it changing anything in terms of urban design because of a few things:

1. The masses cannot afford to take Uber (or a cab) most of the time. It's an occasional ride for most.

2. Because of this, Uber is not impacting transportation habits in any sizable numbers. It's giving cab companies competition (which they don't like), leaving walking, transit and driving right where they were.

3. Uber is going to struggle to operate in several states and cities. It's basically running an illegal service and it has been banned in several countries, states and cities:

Uber (company) - Regulatory Issues
I disagree. Uber (and its ilk) and Zipcar (and its respective ilk) create the ability to get around for important short/er trips without needing to own and maintain one's own car.

Basically, I look at it in reverse. We own cars because we need to get to places and to do things for which a car is well suited, like long or circuitous commutes or big grocery hauls. But, because we own a car for those things, we have little or no reason NOT to use it for other, marginal trips, trips for which we might not have otherwise gone or for which a car wasn't really necessary.

But, services like Uber, Zipcar, grocery delivery, Amazon Prime (specifically, the free shipping) and Google Express together mean that some of our most important trips no longer require personal ownership of a vehicle. From my perspective, they elevate "alternative" transportation and eat away at the value proposition of personal, private vehicles.

This does not mean that, suddenly, we'll all dump our cars. Certainly not. For many of us, these new services have very little impact, given our individual and present contexts, and we will be fairly set in our ways regardless.

But, this is like Comcast (the incumbent) and Netflix (the alternative); some young people will see the new value propositions and, rather than being cord-cutters, they'll be cord-never-havers, whereas some others will be a little less attached to their Comcast TV service.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2015, 02:55 PM
 
1,478 posts, read 2,001,789 times
Reputation: 1579
The problems with uber are twofold: consistency of quality and the fact drivers make squat. In the future, I see uber drivers wising up. It's something people might do for a couple months when they're a bit short on cash flow, but it's not a job. It's just a bunch of investors who have found a way to get "contractors" to swallow this as part of a "sharing economy" for now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2015, 02:55 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,995 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
From the home of the Libertarian Party:

"Rideshare services like Uber and Lyft, which have enjoyed near-unregulated status for years, are coming under greater scrutiny in Colorado. . . .Thereís talk that a state bill could be introduced this legislative session to add more regulations, like strengthening background checks for drivers. Even though itís just talk, Uber is preparing for a fight. The company has hired eight lobbyists to protect their interests. "- See more at: Uber, Lyft could soon face tighter restrictions in Colorado | CPR
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2015, 03:11 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,152,919 times
Reputation: 7738
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
I disagree. Uber (and its ilk) and Zipcar (and its respective ilk) create the ability to get around for important short/er trips without needing to own and maintain one's own car.

Basically, I look at it in reverse. We own cars because we need to get to places and to do things for which a car is well suited, like long or circuitous commutes or big grocery hauls. But, because we own a car for those things, we have little or no reason NOT to use it for other, marginal trips, trips for which we might not have otherwise gone or for which a car wasn't really necessary.

But, services like Uber, Zipcar, grocery delivery, Amazon Prime (specifically, the free shipping) and Google Express together mean that some of our most important trips no longer require personal ownership of a vehicle. From my perspective, they elevate "alternative" transportation and eat away at the value proposition of personal, private vehicles.

This does not mean that, suddenly, we'll all dump our cars. Certainly not. For many of us, these new services have very little impact, given our individual and present contexts, and we will be fairly set in our ways regardless.

But, this is like Comcast (the incumbent) and Netflix (the alternative); some young people will see the new value propositions and, rather than being cord-cutters, they'll be cord-never-havers, whereas some others will be a little less attached to their Comcast TV service.
interesting point taken yet I think there is context to both your reply and the pot you replied to. Like most things the impact is somewhat personal so both are correct in ways.

Uber though I think is a supplement not a means - also a convenience

I live in the city and have a car. I also use my car, uber, taxis and PT.

I use uber often for work - mostly in other cities as it is expensed. I have used uber black car in philly and switched to uberx as the cost is way better and the black car was the convenience so now is the convenience at a a similar cost to taxis.

when going out in the city and not walking (my most common means) I use taxis and uber (never drive as is a hassle and sometimes more expensive from urban to urban area of my city) I choose on convenience now. At my home it may take 5-10 minutes for a cab wither flagging or calling (calling usually longer) sometimes they are there so no wait. Uber is generally 2-3 minutes from requesting. Coming home I usually would take a cab (again if not walking or PT - like if three of us are out its just as cheap as the subway) as they are there waiting or there in 30 seconds if at restaurant. To me its all about how fast and the cost. Uberx has been a good service and experience for me I will say and do like that no cash changes hands or quirky credit card machines
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2015, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,514,457 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago76 View Post
The problems with uber are twofold: consistency of quality and the fact drivers make squat. In the future, I see uber drivers wising up. It's something people might do for a couple months when they're a bit short on cash flow, but it's not a job. It's just a bunch of investors who have found a way to get "contractors" to swallow this as part of a "sharing economy" for now.
I don't mind Uber being around and people using it, but this is what I don't like about Uber and the reason why I would never use it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2015, 05:11 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,004,486 times
Reputation: 1348
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago76 View Post
The problems with uber are twofold: consistency of quality and the fact drivers make squat. In the future, I see uber drivers wising up. It's something people might do for a couple months when they're a bit short on cash flow, but it's not a job. It's just a bunch of investors who have found a way to get "contractors" to swallow this as part of a "sharing economy" for now.
That's the reality, though it sucks. But people are willing to do it, so I'd expect to see a decline until these services reach some kind of equilibrium. Keep in mind, FedEx (well, a big chunk of it) is done by contractors, not employees, and many other companies are filled with contractors; for many, a tough job that, though lacking in many ways, does manage to pay "enough" is better than no job at all.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2015, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,329,932 times
Reputation: 3562
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
I disagree. Uber (and its ilk) and Zipcar (and its respective ilk) create the ability to get around for important short/er trips without needing to own and maintain one's own car.

Basically, I look at it in reverse. We own cars because we need to get to places and to do things for which a car is well suited, like long or circuitous commutes or big grocery hauls. But, because we own a car for those things, we have little or no reason NOT to use it for other, marginal trips, trips for which we might not have otherwise gone or for which a car wasn't really necessary.

But, services like Uber, Zipcar, grocery delivery, Amazon Prime (specifically, the free shipping) and Google Express together mean that some of our most important trips no longer require personal ownership of a vehicle. From my perspective, they elevate "alternative" transportation and eat away at the value proposition of personal, private vehicles.

This does not mean that, suddenly, we'll all dump our cars. Certainly not. For many of us, these new services have very little impact, given our individual and present contexts, and we will be fairly set in our ways regardless.

But, this is like Comcast (the incumbent) and Netflix (the alternative); some young people will see the new value propositions and, rather than being cord-cutters, they'll be cord-never-havers, whereas some others will be a little less attached to their Comcast TV service.
Some good points, but I think you overlooked my main argument in response to the OP's question. How many people are going car free because of Uber? Is Uber not competition for an already existing market share (e.g. Taxis)? And if not, how much market share has Uber generated away from car ownership? You make a point about value proposition, but how strong is it really regarding car ownership?

Kidphilly made some good points and provided some personal examples. I'm assuming that before Uber existed, he took taxis in its place. Maybe he can answer that. Kind of in line with what I'm pointing to.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top