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Old 01-24-2015, 06:21 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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My suburban city (something else that's been argued to death here) had about 5000 people for many years, then started to grow in the 1980s, when we evil Boomers started to marry, have kids, and buy houses.
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Old 01-24-2015, 06:27 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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The suburb I grew up in reached peak population when the last of the Baby Boomers were children. My high school had double the number of students in the early 70s! Before the mid 50s, it mostly rural land, with a few old houses scattered, there's one from the 1700s. But there isn't much older: only 7% of the housing is from before 1940 and 10% is after 1980. Areas to the north and northwest have more older parts.
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Old 01-24-2015, 06:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
My suburban city (something else that's been argued to death here) had about 5000 people for many years, then started to grow in the 1980s, when we evil Boomers started to marry, have kids, and buy houses.
Since it was already large enough to be on the map, I suspect it fought off the label of "suburb" as long as it could but was finally forced to accept it when development reached its borders.

Last edited by pvande55; 01-24-2015 at 06:30 PM.. Reason: Redundancy
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Old 01-24-2015, 06:32 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Since it was already large enough to be on the map, I suspect it fought off the label of "suburb" as long as it could but was finally forced to accept it when development reached its borders.
All Massachusetts suburbs have been on the map since the early 1800s; the towns have always been there some large, some not so large. The more rural ones that became suburbs often enacted strict minimum lot sizes for new development (1/2 acre? 1 acre?) to keep it feeling rural. Or semi-rural.
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Old 01-24-2015, 06:38 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Since it was already large enough to be on the map, I suspect it fought off the label of "suburb" as long as it could but was finally forced to accept it when development reached its borders.
I think it was glad to see some of the Front Range growth.
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Old 01-24-2015, 07:23 PM
 
1,128 posts, read 1,521,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
The auto-dependent suburbs of today are not remotely the same as the pre-war suburbs. /thread.
In parts of the West or South where there was basically nothing pre-war, sure.

In somewhere like the Northeast, it's very hard to draw a line and call something one or the other, as development has been a more organic process over long periods of time instead of just being 500 home development dropped onto previously empty forest/farmland.
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Old 01-24-2015, 08:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Large cities established their limits long ago and never changed. The entire urban population lived inside the City limits until about 1945 when the first suburb, Levittown NY, was built. The rest of the nation followed. Until recently there was no poverty in the suburbs. Every working person who lived in the suburbs worked in the city, only in the 70s were there offices in the suburbs.

Actually, none of this is true. Railroad suburbs have existed for 150 years. Cities often grew in their early years by annexing suburbs.
Any other widely believed falsehoods you can think of?
Here immediate after the war suburbs started to appear has the great housing boom for veterans started. The changes in people and their experience meant many changes including people moving form place to place and beyond the cities themselves. The war with its production changes changed the idea of city and work. Eisenhower didn't just think of the interstate system by accident; he saw the changes coming in people wanting something other than living their lifes in urban cities in many cases.The American dream changed from what returning GI and their family then wanted. A piece of the America they had experienced unlike many of their parents.many of their parents had never even flown in a air plane before and travel boomed. Here it was a race to annex the suburbs starting in the late 50s with many of them incorporating to avoid it.
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Old 01-24-2015, 08:15 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,967,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
I think it was glad to see some of the Front Range growth.
Locals weren't worried about the community changing?
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Old 01-24-2015, 08:45 PM
 
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Contrary to popular belief, the suburbs of Phoenix are not all towns/cities that are less than 50 years old that just formed because of sprawl. Every single incorporated city in the Phoenix area has been around since the first half of the 20th Century, if not longer. Nearly all local suburbs were small, self-sufficient agricultural towns that happened to all be located in the fertile Salt River Valley. There used to be a day when you would travel through open fields to go from Phoenix to Scottsdale or Chandler to Mesa. As people started moving here, the towns exploded and growth and the development just kind of bumped up against development of other towns and cities, thus forming one big metropolitan area. The suburbs here are not just master planned communities that got so large they incorporated. Each suburb has it's own downtown and older core, but they're usually extremely small and many have been neglected in favor the newer strip malls.
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Old 01-24-2015, 09:53 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Locals weren't worried about the community changing?
Yes and no. As the population grew, the city got more amenities such as a recreation center and a bigger library, also more shopping. At the same time, it wasn't a very small town any more. There is more traffic for one thing, schools got crowded ( although that's been resolved), the "old guard" isn't so much in charge any more.
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