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Old 02-03-2015, 03:47 AM
 
12,299 posts, read 15,194,052 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post
I haven't been able to find any sources that point back to original data but most seem to reference that walking is in the 90% ballpark. I have other older data from 1998-2000 though -

This is % of commuters driving to, getting dropped off, or riding as a passenger to a train station. Keep in mind that these numbers have probably trended downward since then:

For NY area commuter rail, ferries and express buses it's 40%

Caltrain - 54%
BART - 49%

Pittsburgh - 46% for light rail and 11% for busway stations

Portland light rail - 33%

Sacramento light rail - 28%

Buffalo light rail - 21%

The variation, as I'm sure you know, all depends on the type of service and the context of the line itself.
I suppose that in LA Metrolink it's about 80% driving to the station.
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Old 02-03-2015, 01:45 PM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,954,813 times
Reputation: 1953
Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
... and you're no different from anyone else. But the reason you don't think about it isn't because of where you live or how accessible transit is. If it produced even more CO2 you wouldn't care - it's not a factor in your decision making process. You are making a choice based upon what's convenient for you personally.


I just told you that we deliberately moved to a place where we wouldn't have to use our car that much and that you shouldn't completely dismiss the idea that it factors into some people's decision making process . . . because it did with us . . . and with quite a few other people I know and, I would suspect, with a lot of people I don't know.
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Old 02-03-2015, 01:48 PM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,954,813 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
I suppose that in LA Metrolink it's about 80% driving to the station.
That seems to be the profile. Commuter rail has that 9-5 orientation and usually big parking lots so you get that 70-85% driving/getting dropped off ratio. But I'm sure for the light rail/subway in LA that it's closer to the Portland or Sacramento numbers.

Although it's probably important to note that someone driving 3 miles to a train station is a lot different than driving 23 miles to get downtown.
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Old 02-04-2015, 10:19 PM
 
10,139 posts, read 23,289,182 times
Reputation: 8290
Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post
I haven't been able to find any sources that point back to original data but most seem to reference that walking is in the 90% ballpark. I have other older data from 1998-2000 though -

This is % of commuters driving to, getting dropped off, or riding as a passenger to a train station. Keep in mind that these numbers have probably trended downward since then:

For NY area commuter rail, ferries and express buses it's 40%

Caltrain - 54%
BART - 49%

Pittsburgh - 46% for light rail and 11% for busway stations

Portland light rail - 33%

Sacramento light rail - 28%

Buffalo light rail - 21%

The variation, as I'm sure you know, all depends on the type of service and the context of the line itself.

Where is this data published, exactly?
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Old 02-05-2015, 07:25 AM
 
2,824 posts, read 3,349,928 times
Reputation: 3030
Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post


I just told you that we deliberately moved to a place where we wouldn't have to use our car that much and that you shouldn't completely dismiss the idea that it factors into some people's decision making process . . . because it did with us . . . and with quite a few other people I know and, I would suspect, with a lot of people I don't know.
Not once did you claim that CO2 emission factored into your decision process. Your process was guided by having accessible transit, not for reducing CO2 production. It's quite clear that it was all about convenience for you not about reducing CO2 emissions. Point is that it is about convenience for everyone else too and you aren't any different.
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Old 02-05-2015, 01:07 PM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,954,813 times
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Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
Where is this data published, exactly?
The data is everywhere. google it. Just make sure that some version of "station access" by mode is part of your query.
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Old 02-05-2015, 01:43 PM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,954,813 times
Reputation: 1953
Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
Not once did you claim that CO2 emission factored into your decision process. Your process was guided by having accessible transit, not for reducing CO2 production.
Well, I don't think too much about my CO2 budget from transportation on a daily basis because we deliberately moved to a place where we had easy transit access to work and where we could walk or bike most other places.

That means that I don't think about it every day because I don't have to think about it everyday because we thought about it a lot a while ago and made the decision to live in a place where we wouldn't have to drive much. CO2 emissions, air pollution, and oil wars all factored into that decision making.

We also thought about where our electricity comes from and, because it wasn't a tough to decision, now purchase our electricity from renewable sources. I don't think about that everyday either because I don't have to. I don't need to high five myself everytime I turn a light on or ride my bike to the store. We thought about it 15 years ago, we made the switch, it's done.
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