U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-28-2015, 05:55 AM
 
545 posts, read 821,133 times
Reputation: 299

Advertisements

cities seem to be making a big comeback. people are moving from the suburbs back to downtowns. but will this trend happen with EVERY city, or just the major cities that attract jobs and white collar workers? For example, will Reading Pa and Flint MI go through revitalizations as well? Or are these cities so poor and dangerous that they are forever doomed?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-28-2015, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,902 posts, read 7,684,245 times
Reputation: 4518
I think it depends on how much cool stuff (i.e. architecture) is still there. For example, from the pictures I've seen of E. St. Louis and Gary, there isn't a lot left. But, Youngstown was able to keep the core of its central business district somewhat intact, and we're seeing quite a bit of revitalization.

Over the last 5-6 years: 3 buildings have been converted to apartments, a number of buildings were brought back into use by the Youngstown Business Incubator, and a new office building was constructed for the incubator. There are 3 more apartment conversions currently underway. And, another vacant building will be converted to a hotel within the next year or two.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2015, 10:27 AM
 
3,952 posts, read 4,071,103 times
Reputation: 4437
I think a larger driver than cool architecture is 1) a desire by the city to change, 2) some knowledge/plan on what to do.

Then you also have to answer the question, 'Is the city's demise due to poor local government or is there a regional level of goverment that is making major decisions with federal funding?' over the top of the local government.

When I say 'some knowlege/plan' on what to do, this means modern principles, such as changing local development code to support higher density mixed use, revitalizing downtown areas with TIF & extra taxes, and considering road diets, losing lanes for bicycle & walking, and big-planning things like highway tear outs and uncovering buried rivers.

I don't mean building a big commercial complex on the edge of town, new greenfield suburban single-family-only developments, sports stadiums, or using taxes to poach businesses from other parts of the country. You'd be surprised how many cities are doing those kinds of things in order to 'save their cities'.

Plenty of neighborhoods fight code changes, density, and traffic even as they collapse. And council members tend to be more wealthy, so it takes longer for them to feel the effects than the poorer sides of towns as they fail, so to preserve their political careers, they are happy to listen to their constituents and vote against radical changes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2015, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,975 posts, read 4,096,120 times
Reputation: 1213
Cities which invest in infrastructure, especially public transport, pedestrian safety, bicycling, and trails/greenways, will be most likely to make and continue making a comeback. If people *have* to drive everywhere they will still prefer to live in suburbs or rural communities in commuting range (cheaper and more space). Even if most people moving in to the city will still want to have a car for convenience and most families with children will still need one, that's different than needing to have a car for every trip.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2015, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Birmingham
779 posts, read 772,325 times
Reputation: 359
Birmingham, AL is making a huge comeback. Too many developments to even remember/mention.

In the new Parkside district alone:

-Railroad Park (a very popular park that has basically created the new "Parkside" district. That was finished several years ago)
-The adjacent Region's Field (new baseball stadium that brought the Birmingham Barons back downtown from the suburbs and has had a ton of sold out crowds since it opened two years ago)
-Under construction next door is the Negro Souther League Museum
-Next door to that is an apartment building with around 350 units under construction
-One block away is another 300+ unit apartment building under construction
-The new "Rotary Trail" has broken ground (in the old railroad cut out)
-Another block away the new Intermodal Facility is under construction
-Across from that the old steam plant is being converted to a new public space
-The old Merita Bakery Factor is being converted to a multi-tenant restaurant and office space.

This is happening all over the city in various districts. It's truly a marvel to sit back and watch a city transform so dramatically before your eyes. I have live in many cities and have never seen such a dramatic change in 3 years. (The amount of time I've lived here.)

It's easy to see how public contributions have spurred private growth as well. (The Railroad Park and Region's Field were essentially the first investments in the area.) I don't think that all cities will make a comeback. As Hurricane said previously, it will take cities investing in infrastructure such as public transport but also public amenities.

I also think it's important that cities understand the value of preserving buildings and "recycling" them for a different use. It has worked wonders in Birmingham... To see an ugly old warehouse be reshaped into a modern thing of beauty that lends itself to Birmingham's industrial past. It give the city an identity as it modernizes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2015, 12:35 PM
 
1,915 posts, read 2,059,995 times
Reputation: 2192
Quote:
Originally Posted by gottaq View Post
cities seem to be making a big comeback. people are moving from the suburbs back to downtowns. but will this trend happen with EVERY city, or just the major cities that attract jobs and white collar workers? For example, will Reading Pa and Flint MI go through revitalizations as well? Or are these cities so poor and dangerous that they are forever doomed?
It will be just the cities with jobs and white collar workers. Certain cities, like Detroit, are politically wrecked.

Moreover, let us see exactly *who* is doing the moving to downtowns:

1. The students (when a campus is there). They aren't "moving back", they are leaving the (suburban) family home.
2. The younger singles (who often just graduated from the campus), looking to mingle. And so many gentrification efforts involve cafes and bars.
3. The gays in some cities, looking for a cluster of like minded sexually.
4. The senior citizens (when enough hospitals and clinics and senior citizen amenities are nearby).

What do these diverse groups have in common? No kids, or perhaps fully grown ones.

Who are not moving there are families with children. The proportions of children under 18, never mind the absolute numbers of those under 18, in these cities have continued to fall, census after census.

Last edited by NickB1967; 01-28-2015 at 01:46 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2015, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Birmingham
779 posts, read 772,325 times
Reputation: 359
Don't forget empty nesters. Many of them are moving into the city to enjoy theater, nightlife, and other things.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2015, 12:39 PM
 
1,915 posts, read 2,059,995 times
Reputation: 2192
Quote:
Originally Posted by bhamoutlook View Post
Don't forget empty nesters. Many of them are moving into the city to enjoy theater, nightlife, and other things.
I sort of think of them as senior citizens.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2015, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,640,529 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by NickB1967 View Post
It will be just the cities with jobs and white collar workers. Certain cities, like Detroit, are politically wrecked.

Moreover, let us see exactly *who* is doing the moving to downtowns:

1. The students (when a campus is there). They aren't "moving back", they are leaving the (suburban) family home.
2. The younger singles (who often just graduated from the campus), looking to mingle. And so many gentrification efforts involve cafes and bars.
3. The gays in some cities, looking for a cluster of like minded sexually.
4. The senior citizens (when enough hospitals and clinics and senior citizen amenities are nearby).

What do these diverse groups have in common? No kids, or perhaps fully grown ones.

Who are not moving there are families with children. The proportions of children under 18 in these cities have continued to fall, census after census.
And? Though just because the majority of people moving to cities might be without kids doesn't mean no one with kids lives in cities. I know a number of people in Portland who moved here when they didn't have kids and are now living in the city raising their kids.

Those students, young singles, and gays are the ones that migrate to a city and many of them decide to stay to raise a family.

Of course young people are putting off things like marriage and children to later ages these days, and when they do start having kids there is a growing trend to have less kids. Living in the city with 2 adults and 3 kids is not an easy task. Living in the city with 2 adults and 1 kid is much more manageable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2015, 01:30 PM
 
1,915 posts, read 2,059,995 times
Reputation: 2192
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
And? Though just because the majority of people moving to cities might be without kids doesn't mean no one with kids lives in cities. I know a number of people in Portland who moved here when they didn't have kids and are now living in the city raising their kids.

Those students, young singles, and gays are the ones that migrate to a city and many of them decide to stay to raise a family.

Of course young people are putting off things like marriage and children to later ages these days, and when they do start having kids there is a growing trend to have less kids. Living in the city with 2 adults and 3 kids is not an easy task. Living in the city with 2 adults and 1 kid is much more manageable.
The census figures, decade after decade, simply do not bear this out. The Portland singles mingle, they marry, and if they have children, they usually move out to Tigard, Beaverton, Clackamas, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top