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Old 02-14-2015, 01:31 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post


Homeonwership rate in Philadelphia: 53%
Nationwide: 65%
Yeah, I shouldn't have said national - I meant 'compared to other cities around the country'. For instance - Boston 34%, NYC 53%, DC 42%, SF 37%, Chicago 45%, etc.

Not sure about other cities but homeownership has declined in Philly by a few points since 2000 - partly because of foreclosures/the recession and in part because the immigrants and millennials who are coming in have a different relationship to housing when compared to the families and seniors who are moving out.
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Old 03-01-2015, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Crestone, Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
It also mentioned that gentrification occurs in select cities in certain regions and using the 50 biggest cities in the country will include Sun Belt cities and even suburbs.
The 50th largest city in the United States is Arlington, Texas, itself a suburb and the rate of gentrification is as expected, 0%
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Old 03-01-2015, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Crestone, Colorado
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Anyone actually go through the maps of the links? The results are very strange. First, their focusing on gentrification by the change in owner-occupied home value rather than income. For NYC, many of neighborhoods got labeled "gentrified" because their home value was either near or above the metro median. These were "too good" to count as gentrifying. The result? Much of the city, even rather poor parts, are classified as "ineligible to gentrify" because owner occupied home values are high. Most residents don't own homes, those that do are better off than the neighborhood average. The ones that did count as gentrifying seem like a rather bunch.

Their method would have more issues with New York City than most cities, but a number of other cities look off, it doesn't pass a "smell test".
I was a taxi driver in Denver and know all the neighborhoods, who lives there and the housing stock. And lived in a neighborhood that was beginning gentrification in the late 70s. The maps, of Denver, make sense to me. Neighborhoods that gentrified were, for the most part, neighborhoods near downtown that have a good stock of big, often brick, but often run down houses, some of which had been cut up for apartments. I'll give one house as an example, as I considered buying it. It was listed in about 1974 or so for 16 thousand. It was a three-story brick on the edge of the African-American neighborhood just nw of the hospitals in north Capital Hill, about 21st and Humbolt, nw corner. It had been divided up into about 6 apartments with poor single people living in the apartments, all either Latino or African-American. Later I knew the gentrifier, a young yuppie, and helped him remodel the house, for a few days. He had evicted everyone and make it back into the mansion it once was. I'm pretty sure that house, fixed up, if it were on the market today, would have an asking price of $300k or more. So you see in that example how the renters are moved out, and how mostly cosmetic remodeling transmogrifies both the ambiance and the housing values. Some of the other original homeowners in that neighborhood had more options, perhaps they fixed their own houses up and remained or maybe they cashed out. I suppose assessments increased, but I doubt many are actually forced to move just by that (Colorado property taxes are not that bad).
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Old 03-02-2015, 05:49 AM
 
Location: Crestone, Colorado
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The report includes only the top 50 cities. None in Connecticut seem to qualify, but gentrification is clearly taking place. Here Gentrification and communities on the rise? is a good discussion.
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