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Old 02-12-2015, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Queen Creek, AZ
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Many cities assign colors to their different rail lines for identification.

I would like to know, which cities try to be politically correct when assigning their line colors? I know that most cities do not use the colors black or white. Also, in Atlanta the Asian-American communities complained about the MARTA line serving their area being called the "Yellow Line", which is why it was renamed the Gold Line, however, other cities (such as Chicago whose Yellow Line serves Skokie) seemed to have no issue.

I know some are against it and actually prefer the opposite.

I would admit that for my dream light rail and streetcar system for the Phoenix metro area, some of my color assignments are an attempt to be politically correct. For example, I use Gold instead of Yellow like MARTA, as part of the line would stop at Mekong Plaza in Mesa. Also, I tried to avoid Hispanic areas with my Brown Line, which would serve Scottsdale (Hispanics are often referred to as brown-skinned). Also, my Pink Line would mostly serve politically conservative areas (most of Chandler and all of Gilbert and east Mesa), which probably has a lower than average gay population for the Phoenix area (Tempe probably has the highest percentage).
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Old 02-12-2015, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Birmingham
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I actually think that if you are concerned about being politically correct, you wouldn't want to label a community based on a race... Unless of course it were named "China Town" or something like that. I think it would be politically incorrect to not label your rail a color just because statistics show there is a higher percentage of certain people there. I don't like the ideas of "black community" or "Hispanic community." You also have to consider other people. What if you assumed a place is a Aispanic community and avoid calling it the Brown line so you call it the yellow line.... Then make the 10 percent of Asians in that community upset? I think the whole idea is pointless.
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Old 02-12-2015, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Getting upset over the color of rail lines seems a bit dumb. Though I do like how NYC just uses letters and numbers.
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Old 02-12-2015, 05:00 PM
 
Location: Queen Creek, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Getting upset over the color of rail lines seems a bit dumb. Though I do like how NYC just uses letters and numbers.
Well, technically NYC does use colors to designate trunk lines (Orange for Sixth Avenue, Red for Seventh Avenue, Blue for Eighth Avenue, Yellow for Broadway, Green for Lexington Avenue, Brown for Nassau Street, Purple for Flushing, Lime Green for Crosstown, Light Gray for Canarsie, and Dark Gray for Shuttles), which are based on the lines each route serves in Midtown Manhattan (except for Crosstown which doesn't serve Manhattan at all, and the Shuttles). However, most New Yorkers do not refer to subway lines by color.
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Old 02-12-2015, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink Jazz View Post
Well, technically NYC does use colors to designate trunk lines (Orange for Sixth Avenue, Red for Seventh Avenue, Blue for Eighth Avenue, Yellow for Broadway, Green for Lexington Avenue, Brown for Nassau Street, Purple for Flushing, Lime Green for Crosstown, Light Gray for Canarsie, and Dark Gray for Shuttles), which are based on the lines each route serves in Midtown Manhattan (except for Crosstown which doesn't serve Manhattan at all, and the Shuttles). However, most New Yorkers do not refer to subway lines by color.
That is true, for some reason I wasn't thinking about c that when I said that. Granted as you said, no one goes by the colors there.
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Old 02-12-2015, 06:15 PM
 
33,046 posts, read 22,138,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink Jazz View Post
Many cities assign colors to their different rail lines for identification.

I would like to know, which cities try to be politically correct when assigning their line colors? I know that most cities do not use the colors black or white. Also, in Atlanta the Asian-American communities complained about the MARTA line serving their area being called the "Yellow Line", which is why it was renamed the Gold Line, however, other cities (such as Chicago whose Yellow Line serves Skokie) seemed to have no issue.

I know some are against it and actually prefer the opposite.

I would admit that for my dream light rail and streetcar system for the Phoenix metro area, some of my color assignments are an attempt to be politically correct. For example, I use Gold instead of Yellow like MARTA, as part of the line would stop at Mekong Plaza in Mesa. Also, I tried to avoid Hispanic areas with my Brown Line, which would serve Scottsdale (Hispanics are often referred to as brown-skinned). Also, my Pink Line would mostly serve politically conservative areas (most of Chandler and all of Gilbert and east Mesa), which probably has a lower than average gay population for the Phoenix area (Tempe probably has the highest percentage).

In Portland, the trains have lights and signs corresponding to the line color. Red, blue, green, yellow seem to be easily recognized, and thus make for good signage. I don't think black and white would work well as train signage. And the Yellow Line is nowhere near the Asian population.
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Old 02-12-2015, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Queen Creek, AZ
5,218 posts, read 7,925,822 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
In Portland, the trains have lights and signs corresponding to the line color. Red, blue, green, yellow seem to be easily recognized, and thus make for good signage. I don't think black and white would work well as train signage. And the Yellow Line is nowhere near the Asian population.
If the signs are multicolor LED signs, white can indeed work with all three colors (Red, Green, and Blue) at full brightness. However, cities generally try to avoid using black or white due to potential racism issues. Also, in Chicago, black is used to indicate either "Not In Service" or special trains, which pretty much precludes them from introducing a Black Line in the future.
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Old 02-12-2015, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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I love first world problems.
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Old 02-12-2015, 09:39 PM
 
33,046 posts, read 22,138,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink Jazz View Post
If the signs are multicolor LED signs, white can indeed work with all three colors (Red, Green, and Blue) at full brightness. However, cities generally try to avoid using black or white due to potential racism issues. Also, in Chicago, black is used to indicate either "Not In Service" or special trains, which pretty much precludes them from introducing a Black Line in the future.

The newest trains have multicolor LEDs, the oldest trains use the old fashioned 'scroll' signage of the sort also once used on old buses. I assume there is a name for that but I don't know what it is properly called.

The Portland transit system upgrades a fraction of its vehicles every year or two; at any given time they have at least three generations of buses and three generations of trains in service.
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Old 02-12-2015, 11:02 PM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
4,523 posts, read 2,900,452 times
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Being a little to PC here. After a minor incident at work, we joked how we can't use black and white plastic utensils. We'll have to go to Chipotle for their clear plastic utensils.

The Olympic rings that each represent a major land mass of the world can be racist too....

America = red
Asia = yellow
Africa = black

I guess Europe and Australia at blue and green aren't as bad.
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