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Old 02-17-2015, 07:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
How exactly do you "carve up" a city with something that goes around it?

By the way, I wholeheartedly agree that there should be more investment in public transit, but letting highway infrastructure rot is not the way to do it. And while I understand that the United States let its rail infrastructure rot for several decades, I also understand that two wrongs don't make a right. We deserve both modern public transit and modern highways. The "invest in every mode of transportation except highways" contingency is just as clueless as the "invest in highways only" contingency.
Inner beltways & outer beltways. DC allowed the construction of the outer beltway, but refused to allow a majority of the inner beltway to be constructed, & forced the construction of a subway system instead
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Old 02-17-2015, 07:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mandalorian View Post
The DC Beltway is home to the WORST traffic jams in the US.

Hell, name one other roadway in the US that was plagued by SNIPERS.

If that's your idea of perfect, I don't want to live in your world.
You are missing my point, I am not saying DC is the perfect model because its beltways are the best. I am saying other cities should follow DC's lead in building public transit instead of new high ways. DC fought off the construction of the inner beltway in the 60s, & forced that money to go toward building metro instead
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Old 02-17-2015, 07:54 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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In areas with little population growth, there's not much need for new beltways.
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Old 02-17-2015, 08:03 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Louisville is finishing a bridge over the Ohio River that will connect two sections of the I-265 beltline. When complete it will form a 75% loop around the city.
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Old 02-17-2015, 08:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
In areas with little population growth, there's not much need for new beltways.
not exactly sure what this has to do with considering every city discussed is growing pretty rapidly
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Old 02-18-2015, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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It obviously depends on the metro, here in Oregon we would need a western loop to create a beltway, but that would be a massive undertaking that would involve going through a protected forest hillside and cross over industrial ports and a large river and then cut through more heavy industrial. To top it off, there is no route to run it through the Westside due to the opposition it would face by the people who live on the Westside who would probably use this new freeway, but don't want to lose their homes or neighborhoods to it.

Combine that will no political push for it to happen, and you get a recipe for no new beltways. Not sure if this can be applied to anywhere else, but that is how it is here.
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Old 02-18-2015, 11:59 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mandalorian View Post

Hell, name one other roadway in the US that was plagued by SNIPERS.
I-270

Ohio highway sniper attacks - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


There have been others.
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Old 02-18-2015, 06:49 PM
 
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Beltways are good highway planning as it makes little sense to route traffic between different suburbs regions through the congested central city. Even if the beltway is longer. Needless to say, any new ones will need to be toll roads. However we can forget such outlandish schemes as tunneling under congested areas. Private companies might agree to build them, but only if guaranteed by taxpayer bonds.
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Old 02-18-2015, 07:29 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TyBrGr View Post
not exactly sure what this has to do with considering every city discussed is growing pretty rapidly
I thought the OP was on US metros in general, not specific to rapidly growing ones
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Old 02-18-2015, 08:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TyBrGr View Post
You are missing my point, I am not saying DC is the perfect model because its beltways are the best. I am saying other cities should follow DC's lead in building public transit instead of new high ways. DC fought off the construction of the inner beltway in the 60s, & forced that money to go toward building metro instead
Why when beltway are what people demand. It allows a growing city to create easy access and even avoid much thru traffic.
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