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Old 03-03-2015, 10:28 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Louisville is about to build a 30 story OMNI Hotel, it would be the 3rd tallest building in the city and the first "tall" building since the early 1990s. We've had a lot of moderately tall buildings built and a magnificent 22,000 seat downtown arena but this will be the first skyline changer in a while.

Omni hotel, grocery and apartments coming to downtown Louisville - WDRB 41 Louisville News


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=258qSgmRwsE
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Old 03-04-2015, 02:03 PM
 
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Seattle has 10 skyscrapers and 12 high rise currently under construction for a total of 22 towers. There's also 39 more towers in development.
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Old 03-05-2015, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
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Salt Lake City has been growing upwards all through the recession and sprouted several new towers in the last few years. Currently a new 24 story office building and performing arts center is going up downtown.
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Old 03-05-2015, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,959 posts, read 3,823,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironcouger View Post
Seattle has 10 skyscrapers and 12 high rise currently under construction for a total of 22 towers. There's also 39 more towers in development.
Just this morning, Clise and Graphite Design Group have submitted plans to build 2 more 440' towers for the Denny Triangle area in Downtown Seattle at 2301 7th Street. It feels like every single day there's another 400'+ tower being proposed. Seattle's urban core will be absolutely crazy in 10 years!

If Seattle didn't have such a restrictive height limit, we'd have plenty of supertalls under way right now instead of 30-40+ towers that are all maxed out at 400'-500' tall.
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Old 03-05-2015, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
Just this morning, Clise and Graphite Design Group have submitted plans to build 2 more 440' towers for the Denny Triangle area in Downtown Seattle at 2301 7th Street. It feels like every single day there's another 400'+ tower being proposed. Seattle's urban core will be absolutely crazy in 10 years!

If Seattle didn't have such a restrictive height limit, we'd have plenty of supertalls under way right now instead of 30-40+ towers that are all maxed out at 400'-500' tall.
It is just mind boggling how much Seattle has been growing. I really need to make a trip up there to see how much it has changed since the last time I was there.
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Old 03-05-2015, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
It is just mind boggling how much Seattle has been growing. I really need to make a trip up there to see how much it has changed since the last time I was there.
Well Seattle is basically one big construction site right now. I think the true result of all this construction will be felt more in 5-10 years than right at this moment.
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Old 03-05-2015, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
Well Seattle is basically one big construction site right now. I think the true result of all this construction will be felt more in 5-10 years than right at this moment.
It is good to see, I love Portland and the size of this city and metro, but I also like having our own NYC in the Northwest, and Seattle is that place in my book. I just wish we would be seeing Seattle moving faster with new rail lines throughout the city, probably the biggest mistake they ever made was not putting in a subway system back in the 1900s, but it is good to see them at least trying to make up for lost time.
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Old 03-05-2015, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
It is good to see, I love Portland and the size of this city and metro, but I also like having our own NYC in the Northwest, and Seattle is that place in my book. I just wish we would be seeing Seattle moving faster with new rail lines throughout the city, probably the biggest mistake they ever made was not putting in a subway system back in the 1900s, but it is good to see them at least trying to make up for lost time.
Well, Seattle is certainly no NYC... it's more like a SF-lite. Too much of the city land space is consumed by NIMBY families living in detached single family housing. Moreover, in response to all the complaints from these NIMBYs, Seattle City Council has openly stated that it will be focusing all of the urban growth within "urban villages" and downtown, and that the detached single family neighborhood portions of the city will be protected from encroachment. Essentially, you have an urban core and pocket urban nodes surrounded by un-encroachable bedroom communities (not unlike LA as a matter of fact).

So as much as it's awesome that Seattle is growing rapidly, the space available for true urbanism is incredibly limited as a result of really stubborn homeowners who want to restrict the encroachment of high density zoning.

As for rapid transit, yeah, Seattle really needs a true subway system. Seattle is both blessed and cursed by it's own hilly topography (steep hills are beautiful and give amazing views, but hills also make planning subway systems a nightmare). We're expanding our underground light rail system which will connect all of Seattle's major urban nodes together, which should definitely give the entire city in general a more cohesive and urban feel. That's the thing that I really like about Seattle: it doesn't have just one downtown where all of the high density growth is happening. Seattle essentially has one big downtown and then several smaller downtowns. While the changes to downtown are massive, I think that the biggest factor which will change the entire city as a whole will be the exploding growth in our secondary downtowns: University District, Ballard, Fremont, Roosevelt, Columbia City, Northgate, Capitol Hill, First Hill, and Downtown Bellevue (yes, it's technically it's own city, but the growth there is astronomical as well, and it will be connected by light rail, too, and is pretty much as tied to Seattle as Northgate is).
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Old 03-05-2015, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,544,210 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
Well, Seattle is certainly no NYC... it's more like a SF-lite. Too much of the city land space is consumed by NIMBY families living in detached single family housing. Moreover, in response to all the complaints from these NIMBYs, Seattle City Council has openly stated that it will be focusing all of the urban growth within "urban villages" and downtown, and that the detached single family neighborhood portions of the city will be protected from encroachment. Essentially, you have an urban core and pocket urban nodes surrounded by un-encroachable bedroom communities (not unlike LA as a matter of fact).

So as much as it's awesome that Seattle is growing rapidly, the space available for true urbanism is incredibly limited as a result of really stubborn homeowners who want to restrict the encroachment of high density zoning.

As for rapid transit, yeah, Seattle really needs a true subway system. Seattle is both blessed and cursed by it's own hilly topography (steep hills are beautiful and give amazing views, but hills also make planning subway systems a nightmare). We're expanding our underground light rail system which will connect all of Seattle's major urban nodes together, which should definitely give the entire city in general a more cohesive and urban feel. That's the thing that I really like about Seattle: it doesn't have just one downtown where all of the high density growth is happening. Seattle essentially has one big downtown and then several smaller downtowns. While the changes to downtown are massive, I think that the biggest factor which will change the entire city as a whole will be the exploding growth in our secondary downtowns: University District, Ballard, Fremont, Roosevelt, Columbia City, Northgate, Capitol Hill, First Hill, and Downtown Bellevue (yes, it's technically it's own city, but the growth there is astronomical as well, and it will be connected by light rail, too, and is pretty much as tied to Seattle as Northgate is).
I didn't mean literally like NYC, I meant more figuratively.

With how the development is currently happening in Seattle, it might actually be a good thing that it is creating very dense urban villages and increasing density within downtown. In the long run, this might play a benefit to Seattle as these areas fill up and the call for expanding those boundaries of these urban villages begin to happen. It also makes it easier for the city to properly plan future rail transit expansions knowing it has specific urban villages it can run rail to.
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Old 03-05-2015, 03:59 PM
 
2,290 posts, read 1,298,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
Well, Seattle is certainly no NYC... it's more like a SF-lite. Seattle City Council has openly stated that it will be focusing all of the urban growth within "urban villages" and downtown, and that the detached single family neighborhood portions of the city will be protected from encroachment. Essentially, you have an urban core and pocket urban nodes surrounded by un-encroachable bedroom communities (not unlike LA as a matter of fact).

So as much as it's awesome that Seattle is growing rapidly, the space available for true urbanism is incredibly limited as a result of really stubborn homeowners who want to restrict the encroachment of high density zoning.

That's the thing that I really like about Seattle: it doesn't have just one downtown where all of the high density growth is happening. Seattle essentially has one big downtown and then several smaller downtowns. While the changes to downtown are massive, I think that the biggest factor which will change the entire city as a whole will be the exploding growth in our secondary downtowns: University District, Ballard, Fremont, Roosevelt, Columbia City, Northgate, Capitol Hill, First Hill,.
I have visited Manhattan twice as a tourist. If there is anyplace in the Northwest that has a similar BIG CITY vibe, it is downtown Seattle.

Interesting comparison to LA. I believe that the term is "polycentric", though Seattle's urban core is definitely dominant. I can imagine this general concept being a model for other cities.

The Ave. in the U District has the sort of vibe you get with a main drag by a campus. Northgate is a conglomeration centered around an enclosed mall, Northgate Mall.

Another consideration is corridors. Seattle has several which could be described as long shopping streets. I can imagine these connecting up the different "urban villages" forming a sort of network.

Last edited by Tim Randal Walker; 03-05-2015 at 04:32 PM..
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