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Old 03-04-2015, 10:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
Perhaps these older suburbs could be reinvented as walkable neighborhoods? It has been commented that some of the Millenial generation are interested in walkability.
For now. Wait'll their knees start to go.
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Old 03-05-2015, 12:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
There is a lot of low density suburbs, which seem to be a very popular with many people. I expect this status quo to continue.

As for the inner suburbs becoming walkable neighborhoods-this may be a niche thing. But why shouldn't there be an option for people who want walkability?
Yeah, it's called NYC, Chicago, San Francisco, Boston, and DC. The options exist already. If you cannot afford to live there then it isn't a preference it is an unattainable pipe dream and you can't afford walkable, people don't like being told no so instead of accepting that and saving up to move to Frisco they impose their will in our suburbs.
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Old 03-05-2015, 05:37 AM
 
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Scroll down to Burg's comments I think that, yes, those who prefer suburbia outnumber those who prefer the city; and those who prefer suburbia will respond to higher prices by trying to make the exurbs function for them. So instead of a tide of ex-suburbanites moving into the city, there would be more office parks, strip malls, etc. way out yonder.
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Old 03-05-2015, 10:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
For now. Wait'll their knees start to go.
Let's avoid making this in to yet another aside about walkability--what it is, who wants it, how real is that demand, etc.--because we've beaten than horse to death in thread after thread.
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Old 03-05-2015, 10:49 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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I'll add that in Spain I saw lots of elderly people strolling around the city center. Many seemed like they were walking for leisure rather than trying to get anywhere in particular.
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Old 03-05-2015, 01:00 PM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,953,386 times
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Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
Ummm, no. I don't live in either one. I live in a single family house, less than 15 years old,
how rude of me. Jukesgrrl, meet my friend sarcasm.
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Old 03-05-2015, 01:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
Would this be the lower end of moderate density? I think my immediate vicinity-the northern end of Fremont, in Seattle-would count as such. It is walkable, and there are some conveniences within walking distance. I would describe it as at the lower end of walkable.

It is also quite pleasant. Most of the buildings are small to middling sized pre-WWII houses, with small yards. There are a few old, small brick apartment buildings of similar vintage. There is some newer construction, such as the small, two story apartment building I live in ( eight apartments). There is a main drag a few blocks away, which includes a small grocery store (which is expanding!); and a tiny, locally owned video store, which is a sort of focal point for the neighborhood. There are some other businesses within walking distance.
The density really depends on whether the houses in the picture are strict SF or if there are accessory units and whether it's block after block of detached housing of if there are rowhomes or apartments around the corner. Density is important when it comes to the number and quality of shops one can walk to but disposable income is also a major factor.

Ironically, I think the photo I linked to might be from Flatbush in Brooklyn.
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Old 03-05-2015, 01:16 PM
 
358 posts, read 359,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clampdown69 View Post
they impose their will in our suburbs.
Can you give an example? I feel like you are overreacting. There is no shortage of low-density suburbs. If certain areas are becoming more urban, why does that upset you?
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Old 03-09-2015, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,975 posts, read 4,078,123 times
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Well the "outer suburbs" around here (South Florida) are not being developed as low density suburbs--quiet neighbourhoods with houses with yards, but rather "communities" of zero-line lots, townhouses, and condos. Density with car dependency and epic traffic congestion--arguably the worst of both worlds. It seems that once you start running out of space (either due to geographic barriers like the Everglades or simply due to building too far out for a reasonable commute), at some point, low density suburbs stop being built. And is it really any surprise that people want to be able to walk or take mass transit to go some places instead of dealing with the resulting traffic congestion every trip? All of this is supply and demand, not really "engineered decline."

Low density suburbs are space intensive, and at the end of the day, there's only so much available space within a reasonable commute to employers and amenities. You could imagine more evenly spreading out employers and amenities, but It's ironic, the same zoning practices that are meant to preserve the low-density suburban lifestyle end up limiting where employers and amenities can be, which in turn limits the growth of low-density suburbs and inevitably leads to increased density in the long term.
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Old 04-13-2015, 04:49 PM
 
1,528 posts, read 903,737 times
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Don't worry about what other people are doing. There are plenty of suburbs that aren't going anywhere any time soon. Find one and go for it. Not sure what you are looking for from this thread. Sounds like an attempt to be provocative but to make that interesting you need to take a position on something rather than just state your own preference.
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