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Old 11-25-2016, 11:31 AM
 
391 posts, read 206,961 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Ive talked with parents who lament that their grown children insist on living in Central City instead of with them in the suburbs. Even after paying the train fare, they'd be saving plenty of money towards a down payment on a home.
Maybe they just want to be independent adults.
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Old 11-25-2016, 03:32 PM
 
1,996 posts, read 2,930,623 times
Reputation: 2149
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstsunami55 View Post
Well, if you don't appreciate the amenities available in a dense city, that's fine. I'm not going to judge you based on personal preferences. However, personally, I like "cities" for certain reasons. I like that there's walkability and good public transit such that I don't need a car. I like that there's a lot to do in a small area. I like that there's diversity, not just ethnic diversity, but also age diversity. There's a lot that you can't get in a low-density suburb. If you don't agree, I'm not going to try to convince you.
I feel the same way. I'm willing to pay more in terms of taxes and/or cost of living for the lifestyle I prefer.

Last edited by nei; 11-25-2016 at 10:28 PM.. Reason: bickering
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Old 11-26-2016, 12:05 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by stateofnature View Post
I feel the same way. I'm willing to pay more in terms of taxes and/or cost of living for the lifestyle I prefer.
Aren't we all! Of course, it is a form of "priviledge" you know to be able to say and do that!
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Old 11-26-2016, 01:04 PM
 
1,996 posts, read 2,930,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Aren't we all! Of course, it is a form of "priviledge" you know to be able to say and do that!
ok
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Old 11-29-2016, 07:47 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,749 posts, read 54,373,866 times
Reputation: 31030
Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
To play devil's advocate, suburban "edge cities" are far from dead. They're not expanding like they were in their heyday, and they're slowly losing popularity, but they're still going strong-especially in stagnant metros. Some examples that are still doing well are Maryland Heights [St. Louis], Troy [Detroit], Bloomington [Twin Cities], Sandy Springs [Atlanta], Park Meadows [Denver], and Bellevue [Seattle].

That being said, companies are increasingly locating in downtown locations. Recent examples off the top of my head are the Johnson Controls spinoff Adient moving to downtown Detroit, or McDonalds moving to downtown Chicago.
Yes, some suburbs are growing faster than ever. We are just east of Bellevue, and our little city has doubled in population since 2000, and currently there are over 300 new homes under construction, stating at about $700K, and selling like hotcakes. We have only a couple of small strip malls, but major shopping only 5-6 miles in either direction. It depends on many things, but in our case, proximity to major employers that pay well, great schools, little or no crime, and natural beauty. Though, some of the natural beauty is being lost when woods are clear cut for all these homes.



https://www.tollbrothers.com/luxury-...FUuUfgod9fUCGg

https://lyonhomes.com/washington/highcroft-at-sammamish
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Old 11-29-2016, 08:15 AM
 
2,824 posts, read 3,347,033 times
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Sounds like another real estate bubble.
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Old 11-30-2016, 01:30 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,003,488 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clampdown69 View Post
But the kind of people screaming "the suburbs are declining" are engineering it.
Man, this is a long-running thread. Started March 2015.

But to comment on the original idea, we need to also understand that the suburbs, at least as we know them, were the beneficiaries of a lot of "artificial" engineering and subsidization.

Given the amount of flak I get every time I mention tolls and demand-pricing on local forums, I get the strong feeling that if we only had interstates and tollways, the suburbs would be a lot less attractive.
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Old 11-30-2016, 01:31 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,003,488 times
Reputation: 1348
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Yes, some suburbs are growing faster than ever. We are just east of Bellevue, and our little city has doubled in population since 2000, and currently there are over 300 new homes under construction, stating at about $700K, and selling like hotcakes.
To be fair, there is underlying pressure on prices that allows for this, such that it's not so much growth of "the" suburbs as it is growth in that place at this time.
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Old 11-30-2016, 02:54 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,527,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
Man, this is a long-running thread. Started March 2015.

But to comment on the original idea, we need to also understand that the suburbs, at least as we know them, were the beneficiaries of a lot of "artificial" engineering and subsidization.

Given the amount of flak I get every time I mention tolls and demand-pricing on local forums, I get the strong feeling that if we only had interstates and tollways, the suburbs would be a lot less attractive.
So were/are the cities.
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Old 12-01-2016, 09:24 AM
 
391 posts, read 206,961 times
Reputation: 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
So were/are the cities.
Cities have been hurt more than helped by artificial engineering. Housing projects, for example, concentrated poverty and crime. The federal government has not favored cities at all when it comes to spending. If it has, then cities wouldn't have declined as much as they did. I'm personally against all artificial engineering. I'm all for organic development. I would prefer that the federal government not subsidize one over the other.
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