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Old 01-14-2017, 09:50 AM
 
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I agree with OP. I grew up in inner city Charlotte, NC. Not quite NYC, but it's no Fargo, ND either. As a young adult I moved to Minneapolis and due to not having any money or transportation I was forced to live right downtown in a poor run down building. I HATED IT. Gangs of homeless everywhere begging me to let me stay with them and for money. Drunks everywhere. Being woke up at 3 in the morning by street racers. Loud music and yelling and screaming into the wee hours. My apartment was 400 square feet and I had no privacy. Everyone knew where I lived and frequented. The suburbs are better if you have a car.
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Old 01-14-2017, 11:12 PM
 
391 posts, read 207,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthCAC View Post
I agree with OP. I grew up in inner city Charlotte, NC. Not quite NYC, but it's no Fargo, ND either. As a young adult I moved to Minneapolis and due to not having any money or transportation I was forced to live right downtown in a poor run down building. I HATED IT. Gangs of homeless everywhere begging me to let me stay with them and for money. Drunks everywhere. Being woke up at 3 in the morning by street racers. Loud music and yelling and screaming into the wee hours. My apartment was 400 square feet and I had no privacy. Everyone knew where I lived and frequented. The suburbs are better if you have a car.
That's your anecdotal example. What's your point? Do you agree with the OP?
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Old 01-15-2017, 02:16 AM
 
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I guess you can say it is karma for the suburbs causing the decline of our cities.

I respect your desires for where you wanna live. But please keep these desires away from Los Angeles. IT DOES NOT WORK HERE ANYMORE. That whole "a home with every yard" and "king of our own castle" mentality is out of date in this city. Right now people are pushing to halt ALL construction in Los Angeles, and if it passes, our city is finished. It will be cut down at a crucial time. It would be like killing that caterpillar while it is in the cocoon. L.A. is trying to transition away from car dependency because it can no longer sustain it. People think our traffic woos are because of all the construction and proposed projects. The truth is right under our noses. Because L.A.'s design has not been updated and THAT is causing our problems, and they're trying to kill the solution. They think they are saving the city but in reality the Measure S bill WILL HURT US ALL. Except the rich folks trying to push the bill because they don't want their view of the hollywood sign blocked.
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Old 01-16-2017, 03:20 AM
 
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I would be fine with the 'burbs if most of the suburban towns had a proper main street and square along with transit into the city.

Suburbs don't HAVE to be sprawl and un-walkable, that's just the model that took hold after WWII
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Old 01-16-2017, 07:25 AM
 
15,554 posts, read 13,541,264 times
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Originally Posted by Prytania View Post
I would be fine with the 'burbs if most of the suburban towns had a proper main street and square along with transit into the city.

Suburbs don't HAVE to be sprawl and un-walkable, that's just the model that took hold after WWII
Exactly. I lived int he suburbs of London, UK, and it was walkable and had great mass transit connections (tube station nearby and bus routes). About every area had what they call a "high street" where all the businesses were located for daily needs like bars, small food stores, post office, and other things.
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Old 01-20-2017, 10:59 AM
bg7
 
7,697 posts, read 8,173,260 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prytania View Post
I would be fine with the 'burbs if most of the suburban towns had a proper main street and square along with transit into the city.

Suburbs don't HAVE to be sprawl and un-walkable, that's just the model that took hold after WWII


My suburb in NY is like this. A living Main St, a well-used park and sports fields on the water, sidewalks. At the end of Main st is the railroad to the city -35 mins to Grand central. About half the commuters walk from their houses or apartments to the train station as it is well-located. Doesn't seem to be declining in the slightest. In fact quite the opposite.


EDIT - per Boxus' post - we have a theater, a cinema, a butchers, a fresh pasta maker, wine store, paint store, many restaurants of different cuisines etc etc. As I pointed out in a C-D food thread just now, I can (and do) buy fresh yuzu when its in season at the Japanese deli...


The much maligned monolithic burbs.
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Old 01-20-2017, 11:50 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,013 posts, read 102,621,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bg7 View Post
My suburb in NY is like this. A living Main St, a well-used park and sports fields on the water, sidewalks. At the end of Main st is the railroad to the city -35 mins to Grand central. About half the commuters walk from their houses or apartments to the train station as it is well-located. Doesn't seem to be declining in the slightest. In fact quite the opposite.


EDIT - per Boxus' post - we have a theater, a cinema, a butchers, a fresh pasta maker, wine store, paint store, many restaurants of different cuisines etc etc. As I pointed out in a C-D food thread just now, I can (and do) buy fresh yuzu when its in season at the Japanese deli...


The much maligned monolithic burbs.
Yeah, yeah, yeah! /s Forgive my cynicism.

My suburban city (of that over-grown cowtown, Denver) has most of those amenities, too. I've been saying it for years on here. Some don't want to believe it. I've actually been accused of lying for saying my city has intra-city bus service, even when I've posted the schedules.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 01-20-2017 at 12:28 PM..
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Old 02-04-2017, 11:40 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,256,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bg7 View Post
My suburb in NY is like this. A living Main St, a well-used park and sports fields on the water, sidewalks. At the end of Main st is the railroad to the city -35 mins to Grand central. About half the commuters walk from their houses or apartments to the train station as it is well-located. Doesn't seem to be declining in the slightest. In fact quite the opposite.


EDIT - per Boxus' post - we have a theater, a cinema, a butchers, a fresh pasta maker, wine store, paint store, many restaurants of different cuisines etc etc. As I pointed out in a C-D food thread just now, I can (and do) buy fresh yuzu when its in season at the Japanese deli...


The much maligned monolithic burbs.
Yeah, but the NYC area is kind of unique. Most U.S. suburbs don't look like Westchester County, where you could conceivably live without a car, and many people can just walk to get all the basics.
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Old 02-04-2017, 06:40 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,013 posts, read 102,621,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Yeah, but the NYC area is kind of unique. Most U.S. suburbs don't look like Westchester County, where you could conceivably live without a car, and many people can just walk to get all the basics.
It depends on what you mean by "most U.S. suburbs". "Most" Denver suburbs are livable without a car, not all of them equally as convenient w/o one, but livable. I've spent quite a bit of time in Omaha, Nebraska; I'd say the same for that city. Most Chicago suburbs are fairly self-contained as well. So that's three cities in flyover country. Exurbs and semi-rural suburbs probably require a car to live w/o a lot of difficulty obtaining the basics of life.
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Old 02-04-2017, 07:30 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,989,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
It depends on what you mean by "most U.S. suburbs". "Most" Denver suburbs are livable without a car, not all of them equally as convenient w/o one, but livable. I've spent quite a bit of time in Omaha, Nebraska; I'd say the same for that city. Most Chicago suburbs are fairly self-contained as well. So that's three cities in flyover country. Exurbs and semi-rural suburbs probably require a car to live w/o a lot of difficulty obtaining the basics of life.
also depends on what level of convenience counts as livable. From what I can tell, a number of Westchester suburbs are unusually pedestrian-friendly. The similar to the cities you described would be old Chicago railroad suburbs, but even there I doubt any of them (excluding Evanston/Oak Park which gets the Chicago L) have "half commuters walking to the train station"; though I think bg7 is exaggerating, those Westchester still have a very high amount of people walking to transit.
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