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Old 03-30-2015, 05:02 PM
 
1,264 posts, read 2,150,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
Just narrow and bad interchanges.
That road is nice and has great pavement but that road would not be up to Interstate highway standards... very narrow right shoulder and pretty much no left shoulder.
There are a lot of interstates with no left shoulder.
The lack of a right shoulder is not common on French Autoroutes, here it is because the highway is located in a mountainous area with a lot of tunnels.

Note that limit speed on rural french Autoroutes is 130 km/h (80 mph)

This is more typical.



Last edited by Minato ku; 03-30-2015 at 05:16 PM..
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Old 03-31-2015, 07:59 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,708,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I noticed the lack of shoulder, too. But I assume that's from the number of tunnels and hillsides it goes through, it's rather impressive terrain there. I posted a video above your post of an US interestate with no shoulder. The pavement is not so nice.
Well yeah its a NYC freeway

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minato ku View Post
There are a lot of interstates with no left shoulder.
The lack of a right shoulder is not common on French Autoroutes, here it is because the highway is located in a mountainous area with a lot of tunnels.

Note that limit speed on rural french Autoroutes is 130 km/h (80 mph)

This is more typical.


I guess those look pretty similar to a rural Interstate Freeway in the states, just add a way larger median.

Urban freeways is what i had in mind but i know other countries don't have huge freeways going right through the city center.
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Old 03-31-2015, 08:05 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,708,360 times
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Idk much about different pavements (concrete vs asphalt) but whatever this is i like, very nice to drive on.

I also wonder why the lines on the shoulders in Mexico are dashed like that?
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Old 03-31-2015, 08:33 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,148,414 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Changing the subject.



A British poster complained that some Massachusetts freeways had on ramps that were too short and they weren't as good as back home. Haven't been to Germany but I haven't seen an onramp as short as this in Great Britain:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.7825...5NEWlbAzew!2e0

Had to stop on the onramp because there wasn't space to merge.
spend more time driving in PA, that is a spacious merge for some roads here (76, 309, route 1)



https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9484...U2AfPZvk1w!2e0

76 has a number these nicknamed merge or die

PA has some old and awful infrastructure

Also one thing is the NJ Turnpike is the only highway in the US built at German Autobahn spec - NJ has some great highways actually in contrast to neighboring PA
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Old 03-31-2015, 09:53 PM
 
1,264 posts, read 2,150,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
I also wonder why the lines on the shoulders in Mexico are dashed like that?
I don't know about Mexico but in France, lines on the shoulders are dashed to allow the drivers to evaluate the distance between the cars.
Those lines are longer than the one separating the traffic lanes.

There are numerous signs about distance between cars on French freeways.

This is the three one, you see.

- Check your safety distance
-1 line = danger
-2 lines = safety

You can be fined if you drive to close of the front car. (Obviously not in case of traffic jam).
As I said in an other post, there are strict lanes discipline rules on French rural freeways, you must stay on the right lane as much as possible.
Overtaking is only allowed by the left.

Last edited by Minato ku; 03-31-2015 at 10:12 PM..
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Old 04-01-2015, 01:22 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,708,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minato ku View Post
I don't know about Mexico but in France, lines on the shoulders are dashed to allow the drivers to evaluate the distance between the cars.
Those lines are longer than the one separating the traffic lanes.

There are numerous signs about distance between cars on French freeways.

This is the three one, you see.

- Check your safety distance
-1 line = danger
-2 lines = safety

You can be fined if you drive to close of the front car. (Obviously not in case of traffic jam).
As I said in an other post, there are strict lanes discipline rules on French rural freeways, you must stay on the right lane as much as possible.
Overtaking is only allowed by the left.
Oh i see, that is a pretty good idea.

We have the same rules (stay right, pass on the left) they just are not enforced at all.
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Old 04-05-2015, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Just outside of McDonough, Georgia
1,057 posts, read 848,723 times
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The Dutch Rijkswegen, in terms of quality at least, are simply astounding.



The system is also constantly being expanded and upgraded. If you go to Google Maps and do a street view of various Dutch motorways, quite a few of them don't look anything like they did in, say, 2003. Heck, the A4 (as shown in that video) is being extended further south.

- skbl17
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Old 04-06-2015, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,675 posts, read 8,743,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
Idk much about different pavements (concrete vs asphalt) but whatever this is i like, very nice to drive on.

I also wonder why the lines on the shoulders in Mexico are dashed like that?
Asphalt is a lot smoother. Washington State used to have concrete on I 5. In BC it was asphalt. Once across the border you really noticed the difference. The concrete was poured in sections, so every couple of seconds you hear and feel a little clickity noise. Awful.
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