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Old 04-02-2015, 09:44 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,008 posts, read 102,606,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
If nationwide, it's partially because the NYC metro has a high share of very long commutes, and of those many of those are public transit commutes (Manhattan-bound).
I believe Chicago figures in as well, in both categories.
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Old 04-02-2015, 09:53 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,979,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
I believe Chicago figures in as well, in both categories.
From Table 1, Chicago made it to the list of "mega commuters" — those with 90+ minute commutes each way. But seven metros rank higher. NYC is actually #2 after the San Francisco metro, but it has over four times as many residents. Chicago's rate is a bit under half of NYC's.

DC mega commuters take transit at the same rate as DC commuters [I think the numbers are for those that work in DC]. Mega commuters tend to be somewhat wealthier than DC workers as a whole.

http://www.census.gov/newsroom/relea...mmuters_us.pdf

I've heard of a few Manhattan commuters living 70+, even 90 miles away. Often it's a 20 mile drive to a train station with fast and frequent service.
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Old 04-02-2015, 10:09 AM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,005,466 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FallsAngel View Post
Perhaps if you read my posts, and specifically my links, you'd get it.

Fewer people with long commutes drive alone; more take public transportation.
I did not nor do not deny that some of the numbers may have changed, in this case specifically for the subset of commuters who have commutes longer than 90 minutes. My original position--for all commuters as a single group, most of them drive, and do so alone--stands, and the numbers you presented do not deny that position.
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Old 04-02-2015, 10:18 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,979,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkeconomist View Post
I did not nor do not deny that some of the numbers may have changed, in this case specifically for the subset of commuters who have commutes longer than 90 minutes. My original position--for all commuters as a single group, most of them drive, and do so alone--stands, and the numbers you presented do not deny that position.
from my link 11.3% of 90+ min commuters take public transit vs 5.0% for commuters overall.
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Old 04-02-2015, 11:10 AM
 
Location: IN
20,852 posts, read 35,958,846 times
Reputation: 13297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
And well worth it for the quality of life.
What determines quality of life? What type of neighborhood, density, zoning, lot size, etc. do you find desirable within a city context?
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Old 04-02-2015, 12:33 PM
46H
 
967 posts, read 586,296 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Oh yeah. For instance, let's suppose I were to drive to my office in Manhattan. About 17 miles. Use the IRS rate of 57.5 cents per mile, plus tolls and parking. Parking is ~$500/month, tolls are $11.75/day, call it 21 days a month.
34 miles * 57.5 cents per mule * 21 days = $410
11.75 * 21 = 246.75
$500 parking.

So, call it $1150 a month to drive. I'm currently paying about $3000/month for my 4BR house with garage. Care to guess how much house you can get in walking distance of my office for $4150/month, or $4035/month within short public transit distance (the reduction accounts for metrocard cost)? No house, but you can rent a 2BR apartment.
(there's also a tax disadvantage of several hundred dollars, but that's a separate subject)
You just need to find a rent stabilized 2BR for $1200/month. I know they are out there - I have friends living in a few. They plan to leave them to their kids.
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Old 04-02-2015, 02:21 PM
 
223 posts, read 304,068 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickB1967 View Post
Compared to the costs of crime, violence, and being packed into tenements, still a trifle.
Exactly how many decades has it been since you were in an actual city?
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Old 04-02-2015, 02:52 PM
 
8,199 posts, read 6,130,220 times
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I don't really understand the point of these types of articles. The people that want to live in the urban core are going to do so. The people that don't want the hassle of everything dense living entails will choose the suburbs, exurbs or rural areas.

The only for these articles I can think of is that the proponents of high density living have an agenda that includes forcing people to live a certain way, or at least penalizing them severely if they choose not to.
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Old 04-02-2015, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Upstate NY
35,489 posts, read 10,514,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
you mean it is worth it to suffer all the congestion, wasted hours sitting behind the steering wheels (for many more than two hours each day), pollution as well as stress, for a large suburban house with absolutely nothing nearby?

Quality of life is not defined by living space. It includes far more than that.

In fact,.quality of life is defined by those living it. And for many, it just might be living space. Consider rural residents with even more space around them.

*sigh*
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Old 04-02-2015, 03:47 PM
 
1,915 posts, read 2,050,065 times
Reputation: 2192
Quote:
Originally Posted by MKEastsider View Post
Exactly how many decades has it been since you were in an actual city?
Less than one. Come on out to the West Coast, where what is nice in an "actual" city is not affordable and vice versa. Maybe you would be a bit less smug and arrogant after that.
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