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Old 03-31-2015, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Columbus,Ohio
1,014 posts, read 3,119,280 times
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Sadly in about 20 -25 years the outer suburbs and and exurbs with newer housing stock and even more auto centric sprawl than the post war burbs will probably see significant decline. Reason being being that much of this new construction ( 1990s 2000s 2010s) is built cheaply and those homes will even age worse than those built from the mid 40s to the 1960s. Some of the suburbs of many cities with most of their housing stock built in
between ala 70s and 80s are already seeing decline.. The newer homes may be more roomy but with the cheap construction these homes have the tendency to fall apart much sooner. Another strike against them is that they have even LESS architectural character than those built in the post war mid 20th century.
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Old 03-31-2015, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,657,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Garfield Heights isn't that white; it's 59%, low for the region. 24% of housing is pre-1940, 48% of the housing stock is built 1940-1960.
Exactly. The fact that almost half of Garfield Hts. housing stock was built in that increasingly undesirable era, (small houses that don't have the character of the pre-1930s housing, or the additional space of newer houses) and there aren't other contributing factors like prime location, affluence, etc. indicates that it has a rocky road ahead.
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Old 03-31-2015, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,062 posts, read 16,081,530 times
Reputation: 12636
Quote:
Originally Posted by otters21 View Post
Sadly in about 20 -25 years the outer suburbs and and exurbs with newer housing stock and even more auto centric sprawl than the post war burbs will probably see significant decline. Reason being being that much of this new construction ( 1990s 2000s 2010s) is built cheaply and those homes will even age worse than those built from the mid 40s to the 1960s. Some of the suburbs of many cities with most of their housing stock built in
between ala 70s and 80s are already seeing decline.. The newer homes may be more roomy but with the cheap construction these homes have the tendency to fall apart much sooner. Another strike against them is that they have even LESS architectural character than those built in the post war mid 20th century.
Scary.

According to JR_C, the stuff built after WW2 all falls down within 30 years. Since this happens even faster than 30 years for the stuff built in the '90s, which is now 20 years old, do you have any examples of neighborhoods where they've started falling down for us?
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Old 03-31-2015, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Columbus,Ohio
1,014 posts, read 3,119,280 times
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In my city of Columbus OHIO ( I cannot speak for other cities) it is happening in many of the apartment/townhome complexes that were built in the 1990s or later. A great deal of the units have been rented out to undesirable tenants who do not care about the upkeep and their places are going to pot and there are many inner city issues. A prime example of that are a few complexes off Gender Road on the far southeast side of C-bus almost into Canal Winchester. Also much of the Northland area which was built in the 70s, 80s and even some in
the early 90s has seen significant decline around Morse Rd. and off of Rt. 161 ever since the Northland Mall closed. Some of the houses have owners that really care about their properties and keep them up but other homes look pretty shabby. Ever since the mid/ late 90s there has been a major uptick of crime and inner city issues in that area.

Last edited by otters21; 03-31-2015 at 07:17 PM..
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Old 03-31-2015, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,062 posts, read 16,081,530 times
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There's lots of homes that look shabby. I'm not talking about people who just don't paint their houses which then leads to dry rot. For example, McGuire in Seattle had to be torn down when it was nine years old because it wasn't built properly. My uncle used to have rentals in Vallejo, mostly older homes. One of the tenants removed a structural wall (don't ask) and collapsed half the roof. That's nothing to do with the house. The house was fine.
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Old 03-31-2015, 07:31 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by otters21 View Post
Sadly in about 20 -25 years the outer suburbs and and exurbs with newer housing stock and even more auto centric sprawl than the post war burbs will probably see significant decline. Reason being being that much of this new construction ( 1990s 2000s 2010s) is built cheaply and those homes will even age worse than those built from the mid 40s to the 1960s. Some of the suburbs of many cities with most of their housing stock built in
between ala 70s and 80s are already seeing decline.. The newer homes may be more roomy but with the cheap construction these homes have the tendency to fall apart much sooner. Another strike against them is that they have even LESS architectural character than those built in the post war mid 20th century.
Seriously? Much of what was built in the mid-20th, especially for the middle class, was just plain "blah". We rented such a house. It was a box, essentially. Living room, kitchen, two bedrooms with a bathroom between them. Built on a slab with the water pipes embedded in the slab, in Illinois no less. If you turned the heat down too far, say when you were away for a trip at Christmas, the pipes might freeze and break the slab. No dining room, metal cabinets, and not many of them. By the 60s, houses started getting a little larger.
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Old 03-31-2015, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,657,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Scary.

According to JR_C, the stuff built after WW2 all falls down within 30 years. Since this happens even faster than 30 years for the stuff built in the '90s, which is now 20 years old, do you have any examples of neighborhoods where they've started falling down for us?
LOL! I've seen this reference before, but didn't realize that it was attributed to me. I don't know what I said that made you think that's what I meant, but you clearly misunderstood.
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Old 03-31-2015, 07:51 PM
 
687 posts, read 694,365 times
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White Flight will ALWAYS occur. It didn't stop in the 70's or 80's or whenever, it has and is continuing.

The thing with inner-ring suburbs, those built during and after WWII when the automobile became commonplace, are aging rapidly. The housing stock is small (900-1200 sq. ft.) by today's standards and 65-70 year old cheaply built (don't delude yourself into thinking otherwise) houses aren't exactly pleasant. It's certainly not fun to do work on them.

I think boomers are going to have a hard time selling them at the prices they "expect" to get, and with government subsidized housing programs black families (and hispanic) will increasingly move into them, which as those houses continue to age will leave them holding the bag as well as the maintenance costs.
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Old 03-31-2015, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
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Inner ring suburbs in Jacksonville are among the most popular parts of the metro. They were all built up pre-1940 though.
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Old 03-31-2015, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,062 posts, read 16,081,530 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
LOL! I've seen this reference before, but didn't realize that it was attributed to me. I don't know what I said that made you think that's what I meant, but you clearly misunderstood.
My apologies. It was Coldjensen who said post-war houses don't last more than 30 years.
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