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Old 04-02-2015, 08:48 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,527,356 times
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I know what you meant. Is that a problem?
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Old 04-10-2015, 08:54 AM
bu2
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rock Climber View Post
Media likes to report about people moving back into the inner cities.

I'm late GenX, and they used to say the same things about GenX that they say about Millennials. That's why shows like Friends were set in NYC, because GenX were these "urban pioneers" who were gentrifying the inner cities that the Boomers abandoned.

That momentum carried over into the next generation of young people, who happen to be a much larger cohort than GenX, and so the pace seemed to accelerate. But rest assured, just like GenX before them, as Millennials start having families, they'll be heading to the burbs for the "good schools", etc.
Even some of the TV millenials in How I met your mother bought houses in the burbs.
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Old 04-10-2015, 09:35 AM
 
3,940 posts, read 4,034,893 times
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Quote:
In it, single family housing is the bulk of new starts.
This is no surprise. The financing rules for multifamily (both independent and gov't backed) are much more restrictive than single family, and the price-per-sq foot for multi-family tends to be higher. Building and zoning restrictions for multifamily are also much more restrictive, especially in suburbs. Compare that to a greenfield, where the builder might get some incentives to build single family. Even if they don't get incentives, the city is probably paying for major roads to access single family if they don't already exist.

The economics very much favor single family building.
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Old 04-21-2015, 01:23 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
You'd run out of water long before either anyway. Only 3% of the land is urbanized, about five times that much has been set aside as parks and wildlife refuges. I'm a big fan of those and wouldn't mind seeing it being about double what it is currently.
I'd like to see more parks and wildlife refuges set up on city edges and near urban areas. There are vast stretches of nationally or state protected land way out in the boondocks, and for many good reasons, but I want to see a push for land preservation around cities. This would also help to set up limits on growth to encourage smarter development.
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Old 04-21-2015, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,323,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOverdog View Post
This is no surprise. The financing rules for multifamily (both independent and gov't backed) are much more restrictive than single family, and the price-per-sq foot for multi-family tends to be higher. Building and zoning restrictions for multifamily are also much more restrictive, especially in suburbs. Compare that to a greenfield, where the builder might get some incentives to build single family. Even if they don't get incentives, the city is probably paying for major roads to access single family if they don't already exist.

The economics very much favor single family building.
That's probably because the American public has shown a marked disinterest in purchasing multi-family homes over the last fifty or sixty years. At one time, most cities in the Northeast and Great Lakes were filled with owner-occupied duplexes or "doubles" or "two flats" or whatever the local vernacular was. Now, most of these homes are owned by investors or they're derelict. Very few home buyers in the US are interested in purchasing a multifamily home to live in one unit while renting out the other unit(s) even though their grandparents or great grands used the extra money from rent to pay off the family home, finance retirement or send kids to college. Even when a child or grandchild inherits a multifamily home, they often choose either not to rent out the other unit(s) or they remodel the house into a large single family home.
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Old 04-21-2015, 09:16 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,812,547 times
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Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
That's probably because the American public has shown a marked disinterest in purchasing multi-family homes over the last fifty or sixty years. At one time, most cities in the Northeast and Great Lakes were filled with owner-occupied duplexes or "doubles" or "two flats" or whatever the local vernacular was. Now, most of these homes are owned by investors or they're derelict. Very few home buyers in the US are interested in purchasing a multifamily home to live in one unit while renting out the other unit(s) even though their grandparents or great grands used the extra money from rent to pay off the family home, finance retirement or send kids to college. Even when a child or grandchild inherits a multifamily home, they often choose either not to rent out the other unit(s) or they remodel the house into a large single family home.
The regulations around becoming a landlord in many of these places are such that if you're not in the business full time it's not wise to do it. Pro-tenant laws make getting rid of problem tenants difficult, and cost of maintenance to keep up to various safety standards (which wouldn't be applied to owner-occupied residences built before said standards) can be a problem. I'd never get involved as a landlord in a residential lease in NY or NJ.
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Old 04-22-2015, 12:03 AM
 
Location: DC
2,044 posts, read 2,286,081 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
That's probably because the American public has shown a marked disinterest in purchasing multi-family homes over the last fifty or sixty years. At one time, most cities in the Northeast and Great Lakes were filled with owner-occupied duplexes or "doubles" or "two flats" or whatever the local vernacular was. Now, most of these homes are owned by investors or they're derelict. Very few home buyers in the US are interested in purchasing a multifamily home to live in one unit while renting out the other unit(s) even though their grandparents or great grands used the extra money from rent to pay off the family home, finance retirement or send kids to college. Even when a child or grandchild inherits a multifamily home, they often choose either not to rent out the other unit(s) or they remodel the house into a large single family home.
DC has many of these, and these subdivided units do rent out or sell as condos. There is a long tradition of english basements here, which makes the city a little bit different than most. That, and housing is pretty expensive here. But DC, like SF and NYC, is kind of an exception.
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Old 04-22-2015, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DistrictSonic View Post
DC has many of these, and these subdivided units do rent out or sell as condos. There is a long tradition of english basements here, which makes the city a little bit different than most. That, and housing is pretty expensive here. But DC, like SF and NYC, is kind of an exception.
It's the cost of housing in general that makes duplexes/triplexes more acceptable to potential owner occupier landlords in some cities. In cities where housing is cheaper, like Buffalo or Cleveland, most are of these homes are bought by investors, frequently out of towners, who simply milk profits from then and then abandon them.
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Old 04-22-2015, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,323,056 times
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Originally Posted by bjh293 View Post
I'd like to see more parks and wildlife refuges set up on city edges and near urban areas. There are vast stretches of nationally or state protected land way out in the boondocks, and for many good reasons, but I want to see a push for land preservation around cities. This would also help to set up limits on growth to encourage smarter development.
I'm not sure where you live, but in the Northeast and the Great Lakes area, it's quite common to have urban and suburban parks and even nature preserves, so I guess I'm not sure what your idea of "the boondocks" are.
  • New York City, for example not only has two famous Olmstead parks within the city (Central Park and Prospect Park) but also has several state and local parks beaches as well as Fire Island National Seashore out on Long Island. There are all kinds of local and county parks out in Westchester County as well. There are all kinds of state parks and state forests west of the Hudson River within an hour or two of NYC.
  • Buffalo, NY, has several Olmstead-designed parks, including Delaware Park. It also has the Tifft Farm Nature and Times Beach Preserves. There are numerous county and state parks/beaches within less than hour of Buffalo.
  • Erie, PA has the beautiful Presque Isle State Park off downtown. You can take a water taxi from downtown or drive out to the auto entrance on the west side of town.
  • Metro Cleveland, Toledo, and Detroit also have numerous parks.
Having lived in Lincoln, NE, for a couple of years when it was much smaller than it is today, I know there were all kinds of parks in and near the city then, and they appear to have proliferated.


What I think what you really want is to force people to live life-styles you like and approve of even if they want something else.
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Old 04-22-2015, 08:38 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,749 posts, read 54,373,866 times
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Our city is encouraging the "Accessory Dwelling", which has inspired some controversy, but with most lots being 12,000 sf or more, almost any home has room to add an additional unit.

Accessory dwelling unit garners criticism : Sammamish Review – News, Sports, Classifieds in Sammamish, WA
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