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Old 08-20-2008, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
755 posts, read 1,036,016 times
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I have noted that public housing in urban areas tends to be a focal point for criminal activities in most American cities. Although there are plenty of poor/working class folks who need a subsidized place to live, the negative impact on the immediate neighborhoods usually entails lower property values and yes higher crime rates.

What is the solution in your opinion?

- An integration program like section 8, which disperses the poorer folk to cities/town of their choice.

- Staying as-is. Building housing projects in close proximity to localize the crime to specific neighborhoods?

- Ending subsidized housing altogether. This would, in effect, expand the slums of the cities/towns.

I would prompted to ask this question after I read a few studies on public housing and was walking in Manhattan (prime real estate) and saw a housing complex in middle of Midtown-West.

In case you're curious? Harborview Terrace
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Old 08-20-2008, 02:31 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,470 posts, read 25,429,588 times
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I think Mixed income housing so far seems like the best method of development for subsidized housing. Or smaller public housing projects spread around the city, the west coast generally does not have those massive public housing projects cities on the east coast and mid west built. Developments like Cabrini Green, Robert Taylor, Pruitt Igo, etc...are just examples of a massive failure in urban planning and "renewal". I think smaller public housing developments or mixed income developments with subsidized and market rate units so far seem like the best way to house the poor.
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Old 08-20-2008, 02:42 PM
 
Location: East Tennessee and Atlanta
3,674 posts, read 8,778,157 times
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public housing "projects" are havens for blight, crime, poverty, and are detrimental to those areas bordering the projects in cities. I think they should be mostly done away with. Poor folks should be integrated with subsidized smaller homes, condos, or apts within cities' general neighborhoods and populations. Not sequestered into a terrible neighborhood in a complex full of crime.
Projects are "vacuums" for crime, blight, and are an open invitation for a city to go downhill fast (that area anyway).
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Old 08-20-2008, 02:58 PM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,455,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
I think Mixed income housing so far seems like the best method of development for subsidized housing. Or smaller public housing projects spread around the city, the west coast generally does not have those massive public housing projects cities on the east coast and mid west built. Developments like Cabrini Green, Robert Taylor, Pruitt Igo, etc...are just examples of a massive failure in urban planning and "renewal". I think smaller public housing developments or mixed income developments with subsidized and market rate units so far seem like the best way to house the poor.
I agree. Having poor people concentrated in a single area seems like a really, really bad idea. I don't see how families stuck in those types of housing projects can ever hope to raise themselves out of their circumstances, when they and their children are surrounded by people living the same lifestyles and exposed to the same negatives day after day. For the many low-income people out there who want to improve themselves, but don't have the knowledge or tools to do so, a mixed-income or smaller development probably works best. They'd be exposed to others making positive choices in their lives and getting ahead, which would hopefully have a ripple effect, affording them the opportunity to make better choices in their own lives. Some subsidized housing programs offer after-school programs, classes, and resources to help build community and foster self-reliance skills, which seems like a great idea in helping to break the generational cycle of poverty.
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Old 08-20-2008, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
379 posts, read 948,069 times
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^ We visited the Homan Square neighborhood in Chicago a few years ago. It seemed like a successful attempt at this. From Vacancy to Vibrancy
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Old 08-20-2008, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Greater PDX
1,018 posts, read 3,727,886 times
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Why would anyone who could afford not to, want to live in "mixed income housing?" Does anyone really think they can fill the higher-end units in some place like that?
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Old 08-20-2008, 06:04 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,470 posts, read 25,429,588 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Shaft View Post
Why would anyone who could afford not to, want to live in "mixed income housing?" Does anyone really think they can fill the higher-end units in some place like that?
They already do, there are tons of examples of that type of mixed income housing around the country filled with people paying market rate rents next to those with subsidized rents.
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Old 08-20-2008, 06:28 PM
hsw
 
2,144 posts, read 6,352,716 times
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Cut-rate housing....a socialist way to disperse crime and poverty throughout a region....

Darwinian capitalism is usually more effective....some originally poor, recently-arrived immigrant groups, who often face much discrimination, seem to rapidly achieve upward mobility for selves and educate their kids properly for even more wealth creation...others don't and choose to blame everyone but themselves for their poor choices in life/family planning/education/work...
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Old 08-20-2008, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
3,070 posts, read 10,707,602 times
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No, no, and no.

The only real solution is to eliminate poverty, and that will in turn eliminate the crime for the most part. Or if not eliminate all together (Obviously) cut the poverty rate a lot, and it will cut the crime rate a lot.

Section 8 is a failure, and everything like it is. That has been known to ruin once nice neighborhoods and Ive talked about this on some other threads. I have witnessed it for myself first hand.

Staying as-is, is just wrong. I guess its safer to limit most the crime to a certain area of the city, but what about the good people living there? Not to mention it could easily start riots over living conditions and how they are treated unfairly.

Ending subsidized housing is a very dumb idea at this point. We all saw what happened in Chicago and a lot of other cities. Knocking down the projects will just spread crime around the city and destroy once nice neighborhoods, and increase crime even more in already bad neighborhoods.
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Old 08-20-2008, 10:57 PM
 
1,071 posts, read 4,019,889 times
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education - it's the only way to really make a dent in poverty, which leads to crime.

Streicher: Drop-outs = more crime | Cincinnati Enquirer | Cincinnati.Com
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