U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-11-2009, 07:43 PM
 
1,694 posts, read 3,578,541 times
Reputation: 638

Advertisements

LOL yeah it is.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-11-2009, 07:44 PM
 
31,914 posts, read 37,877,669 times
Reputation: 6431
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
CK, isn't that Norfolk?
It could be, but it said Virginia Beach next to the picture. They do run into each other in that area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2009, 07:45 PM
 
31,914 posts, read 37,877,669 times
Reputation: 6431
Here's another picture of VA Beach:
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2009, 07:46 PM
 
Location: moving again
4,386 posts, read 11,642,082 times
Reputation: 1496
Is it dense and vibrant?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2009, 07:48 PM
 
31,914 posts, read 37,877,669 times
Reputation: 6431
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billiam View Post
Is it dense and vibrant?
I would think it is considering it is the biggest city in Virginia and the 40th biggest in the US.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2009, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Boston
5,404 posts, read 9,446,930 times
Reputation: 5788
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Here's another picture of VA Beach:
THAT's VA Beach!

VA Beach is the opposite of Dense and Vibrant. Aside from the small stretch along the beach, it's a giant suburb (and I don't mean it in the figurative, insulting sense that Houston bashers do). I have family in the Kempsville section and it's the epitome of a suburb. It's not dense by any stretch, but it is a nice area. It may be the biggest city in VA, but it's because of the massively expansive city limits. Norfolk has more dense and vibrant neighborhoods, but about 1/2 the population.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2009, 07:51 PM
 
31,914 posts, read 37,877,669 times
Reputation: 6431
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
THAT's VA Beach!

VA Beach is the opposite of Dense and Vibrant. Aside from the small stretch along the beach, it's a giant suburb. I have family in the Kempsville section and it's the epitome of a suburb. It's not dense by any stretch, but it is a nice area.
Yeah, that's true. I haven't been down there in almost 17 years. It is a newer city, as it was pretty much a county before it was built up for tourism.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2009, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Boston
5,404 posts, read 9,446,930 times
Reputation: 5788
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Yeah, that's true. I haven't been down there in almost 17 years. It is a newer city, as it was pretty much a county before it was built up for tourism.
Yeah... my father used to remind us as we drove past new development after new development that he, "used to hunt in a field over there" or, "that's where we used to work on Old Man _____'s farm, it's gone now though."

VA Beach has a population density of 1,712per sq mi over nearly 500 square miles. It's a sprawling place now, and one that's changing quickly. I do have some nostalgia for it though as I've been there just about every year since I was born.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2009, 02:01 AM
 
Location: Purcellville, VA
396 posts, read 473,132 times
Reputation: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
La Defense in Paris is akin to a larger Roslyn/ Arlington VA to Washington DC. It's a skyline that's outside the core of the city. Other European Cities have this as well (Frankfurt being another big example). It's also worth noting that the Monparnasse Tower is considered a blight and a disaster among most Parisians. The point is not that there are no high rises around Paris it's that the core of the city is devoid of them, much like Washington DC, Prague, Amsterdam, and other great European cities. It's easy to live in Paris and never step foot in La Defense. People whose only exposure to urban areas are cities in the Western portion of the U.S. simply do not understand this.

Furthermore, while Washington D.C. and Brooklyn are excellent examples, I can't emphasize enough how the Boston area is perfect in terms of density and walkability. Yes, there are some highrises downtown, but the bulk of the dense, vibrant, walkable areas in Boston and neighborhing cities are devoid of them.

For example,
Back Bay Boston:








Beacon Hill Boston:






South End Boston:




Kenmore Square/ Fenway Neighborhood Boston:






North End Boston









Harvard Square Area, Cambridge:




Davis Square, Somerville:


Central Square, Cambridge:


That's all I'm goint to post, but the list goes on. Newton has dense walkable areas on mass transit lines as does Charlsetown, Jamaica Plain, Coolidge Corner, Brookline, South Boston, Fort Point, etc. The skyline is just a tiny portion of a dense, walkable city.

Its very eerie to me how much those photos resemble any given neighborhood in Washington D.C.! Most of those street level shots could have been taken anywhere in Washington D.C., especially away from the downtown business / financial district.



Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasTheKid View Post
Yeah... Just like the European cities. They have NO skyscrapers.

Washington, D.C. is VERY similar to Paris, as has been pointed out, in that it has may "fringe" cities with skyscrapers, but the core is devoid of them. I suppose it helps though, that D.C. was designed by the same guy that designed Paris. lol!

Im not sure why none of the pics showed up in the quote, but oh well. Im too tired and lazy now to fix it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2009, 09:18 AM
 
Location: In the heights
11,411 posts, read 10,203,955 times
Reputation: 4919
Yea, D.C. is a fantastic example of what I'm looking for, but I hadn't realized that Boston was pretty close to the same way. Of course, Boston does actually have skyscrapers so I guess I should technically rule it out, but I still really want to visit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top