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Old 07-28-2009, 02:39 PM
 
8,256 posts, read 15,143,068 times
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Utica is far from a college town. The central area of Cornhill is extremely dangerous. I'm from Los Angeles and am afraid to drive through Cornhill when I visit my grandparents. South Utica is all old people. West Utica is all families in middle-class suburbs. East Utica is architecturally old, but not many young people. I can't remember North Utica. The area around Utica College is pretty young tho. Then the suburbs are all young families such as New Hartford. Clinton has lots of young people and so does Hamilton due to the two universities nearby.
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Old 07-28-2009, 02:40 PM
 
63,465 posts, read 88,953,518 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Utica, NY went from 280k or 260k in the middle of the 20th century to 60k now.
Actually, Utica went from a peak of about 101,000 from 1930-160's to about 58,000 now. Utica, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 07-28-2009, 02:41 PM
 
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Oh. I thought it was more. I guess when I read that I read it as a "2" instead of "1".
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Old 07-28-2009, 02:46 PM
 
63,465 posts, read 88,953,518 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Utica is far from a college town. The central area of Cornhill is extremely dangerous. I'm from Los Angeles and am afraid to drive through Cornhill when I visit my grandparents. South Utica is all old people. West Utica is all families in middle-class suburbs. East Utica is architecturally old, but not many young people. I can't remember North Utica. The area around Utica College is pretty young tho. Then the suburbs are all young families such as New Hartford. Clinton has lots of young people and so does Hamilton due to the two universities nearby.
North Utica is a newer area that is more suburban in environment. West Utica is blue collar, except for the area around Utica College. It is hit or miss in terms of neighborhoods. South Utica is more of an old money area. Still very nice for the most part and the Zoo is in that area. East Utica is a mix too. There are older inner city neighborhoods, but some nice neighborhoods by Proctor High, MVCC and the Proctor Park. Cornhill is rough and a very poor neighborhood. Seems to be somewhat abandoned in terms of care too.

They tore down Washington Courts projects by the Aud too. Some good athletes like Dave Cash and Dale Shackleford lived there.
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Old 07-28-2009, 02:49 PM
 
63,465 posts, read 88,953,518 times
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Originally Posted by TANaples View Post
Utica is a college town and rated as one of the most liberal places in the country.
You mean Ithaca, but I would make that mistake at times too. Another one is getting Auburn and Albany confused when I was younger too.

Some other NY cities that might fit are: Watertown-once has the highest amount of millionaires per capita and luckily has Fort Drum close by or it would be hurting even worse. Nice people and town though.

Elmira-Again, nice people, but has gone from 50,000 to just under 30,000 now.
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Old 07-28-2009, 03:14 PM
 
8,256 posts, read 15,143,068 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
North Utica is a newer area that is more suburban in environment. West Utica is blue collar, except for the area around Utica College. It is hit or miss in terms of neighborhoods. South Utica is more of an old money area. Still very nice for the most part and the Zoo is in that area. East Utica is a mix too. There are older inner city neighborhoods, but some nice neighborhoods by Proctor High, MVCC and the Proctor Park. Cornhill is rough and a very poor neighborhood. Seems to be somewhat abandoned in terms of care too.

They tore down Washington Courts projects by the Aud too. Some good athletes like Dave Cash and Dale Shackleford lived there.
Good description. I actually don't ever remember being in North Utica.

South Utica is actually very nice. I love that area. My grandparents live near the intersection of Oneida and Higby and the area is beautiful. The homes are kept very well and are generally old homes that have been revovated. It feels like an actualy city there, not a rural place, because the lots are good sized, but there area still neighbors very close. It is mostly old people though, so there will be many homes for sale soon.

Yeah, Proctor Park is nice. The area by UFA (now some old folks home) is downright crappy.

The downtown isn't so hot, but is making a comeback. Utica is definitely on the verge of a boom, though. The Bosnians are completely changing the makeup of the city and are restoring it to its previous beauty in Utica's heyday. Maybe I'll settle there someday if it makes a turn for the better.
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Old 07-28-2009, 03:17 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
12,513 posts, read 20,108,523 times
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Gary, Indiana has been bleeding to death for years. My parents grew up there and it's now a dreadful mess. My dad's old neighborhood looks like a war zone with houses that have either partially burned or have boarded up windows. When my grandfather died in 1987, all his kids could get for the house was $12,000. It's a real shame. From its peak population in 1960 of over 178,000, it has dwindled down to just 96,000 in 2007.

Decatur, Ill has been very slowly bleeding too. It's population is now under 80,000 as it continues to lose population decade over decade.
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Old 07-28-2009, 05:48 PM
 
1,283 posts, read 3,146,935 times
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I dunno about Syracuse not dying. The population just recently fell below 150,000. It used to be upwards of 200,000. However, Syracuse still remains the regional hub of a fairly wide area.
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Old 07-28-2009, 05:57 PM
 
226 posts, read 589,161 times
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Gary Indiana: Broadway Avenue during it's heyday. This picture was taken in 1965 when the city was the second largest in the state, and had a population of 178,320 people.

A lot of the Midwest industrial belt has bled dramatically. Youngstown PA, Decatur IL, Detroit, East St. Louis, Gary. Luckily towns like Cincinatti, Dayton, Columbus, and St. Louis have managed BARELY. Poor up and coming cities like Harrisburg, which I mentioned in my first post, didn't have a chance when the crap hit the fan for American Made industry.

The average midwestern hardworking American was and still could be the working backbone for this country, and now our country needs serious spinal surgery which, if you know anything about medicine, is the most dangerous of all.


Which was a bad comparison to how booming downtown was just 10 years earlier.

Welcome to Gary 2008


Last edited by bhj867; 07-28-2009 at 06:09 PM..
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Old 07-28-2009, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex
3,261 posts, read 8,053,514 times
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Washington, DC in 1950 the population peaked at 802,178 now the population is 591,833 the population increased 3.5%.

Philadelphia in 1950 the population peaked at 2,071,605 now the population is 1,447,395 the population is still decreasing.

Baltimore in 1950 the population peaked at 949,708 now the population is 637,455 the population is still decreasing.

Detroit in 1950 the population peaked at 1,849,568 now the population is
912,062 the population is still decreasing.

Chicago in 1950 the the population peaked at 3,620,962 now the population is 2,853,114 the population is still decreasing.

Cleveland in 1950 the population peaked at 914,808 now the population is 438,042 the population is still decreasing.

New Orleans in 1960 the population peaked at 627,525 now the population is 311,583 the population is still decreasing.

Pittsburgh in 1950 the population peaked at 676,806 now the population is 334,563 the population is still decreasing.

Buffalo in 1950 the population peaked at 580,132 now the population is 276,059 the population is still decreasing.
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